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Toxic Cleanup

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NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
The cleanup at a defunct Northern California copper mine that is ranked among the nation's most toxic Superfund sites will continue as long as needed at no further cost to taxpayers, under a settlement announced Thursday. The agreement with Aventis CropSciences USA could generate more than $800 million for the Iron Mountain Mine cleanup near Redding, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
It was the "sleeper" ballot initiative of California's election season: Few paid heed to Proposition 26, besides the oil, tobacco and alcohol companies that funneled millions of dollars into promoting it in the final weeks of the campaign. Now, from the Capitol in Sacramento to the boardrooms of county supervisors and city councils, lawmakers and lobbyists are scrambling to assess the fiscal and political effects of the measure, one of the most sweeping ballot-box initiatives in decades.
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NEWS
August 4, 1985
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency said he will slow the cleanup of toxic chemical dumps because he is not sure Congress can meet a Sept. 30 deadline for extending the Superfund program. "During the next several weeks, I will begin to implement a slowdown of the cleanup program," EPA Administrator Lee M. Thomas said in a letter to Rep. John D. Dingell (D-Mich.), chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee.
HEALTH
February 1, 2010 | By Trine Tsouderos
An industrial chemical developed to help separate heavy metals from polluted soil and mining drainage is being sold as a dietary supplement by a luminary in the world of alternative autism treatments. The supplement, called OSR#1, is described on the company website as an antioxidant not meant to treat any disease. But the site lists pharmacies and doctors who sell it to parents of children with autism, and the compound has been promoted to parents on popular autism websites. "I sprinkle the powder into Bella's morning juice and onto Mia and Gianna's gluten free waffle breakfast sandwich," wrote Kim Stagliano, managing editor of the Age of Autism blog and mother of three girls on the autism spectrum, in an enthusiastic post last spring.
NEWS
May 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Authorities estimated that it will cost $105 million to clean up rivers and streams flowing into Europe's largest nature reserve that were contaminated in one of the nation's worst ecological disasters. Environment Minister Isabel Tocino announced an eight-year emergency plan to purify the waters that feed Donana National Park and said responsibility for paying for the cleanup lies with "those who produced the [toxic] residue." Tocino has blamed the Canadian-Swedish conglomerate Boliden Ltd.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
A toxic polluter's insurance companies must pay the costs of a cleanup ordered by the government, a state appeal court has ruled in a precedent-setting case. The 3-0 decision by the 1st District Court of Appeal, released Thursday, could require more than 50 insurance companies to pay costs estimated at $100 million by Aerojet General Corp. for cleaning up chemical solvents that leaked into ground water near its Sacramento plant. The ruling was the first by a state appellate court to decide whether a polluter or the insurers who provide coverage for property damage should pay the high costs of removing hazardous substances from the environment.
NEWS
December 17, 1985 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
In a major reshuffling, state Health Services Director Kenneth W. Kizer announced the appointment on Monday of a new management team to run the state's embattled effort to clean up toxic wastes. The administrative shake-up follows Gov. George Deukmejian's expression earlier this month that he has been "a little disappointed" in the performance of the department's toxics unit, the subject of a highly critical audit by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and a probe by the FBI.
NEWS
October 29, 1985 | LEO C. WOLINSKY, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian, broadening his campaign-style attacks on the state's Democratic leaders, Monday accused Assembly Speaker Willie Brown and Assembly Rules Committee Chairman Lou Papan of setting up roadblocks to toxic cleanup. In a speech to a San Fernando Valley business group, the Republican governor charged that the two influential Democrats "torpedoed" his ambitious plans to reorganize the state's diverse toxics program under a single cabinet-level department.
NEWS
February 4, 1999 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO and DOUG SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles Unified School District may have to pay millions of dollars extra to find and clean up chemical hazards at its new downtown high school because top officials failed to act on warnings five years ago that they bought the land without adequate environmental tests, interviews and records show. The warning came in a 1994 memo, distributed to then-Supt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992 | ROBERT BARKER
The City Council has approved terms of an agreement that will allow the NESI Development Group to build about 500 homes on the former Ascon Landfill site once the land is cleaned of toxic waste. The 40-acre property was once a dump for toxic oil wastes beginning in the late 1930s when the city's oil operations were in full swing.
BUSINESS
August 2, 2009 | Richard Verrier
In 34 years as a Hollywood prop maker, John Izumi rarely missed a day of work. Now he can barely pull himself out of bed. His medical records describe a daunting array of ailments: chest pains, headaches, dizziness, memory loss, red blotches and pimple-like bumps. He says he has trouble breathing at night and wakes up with tremors. Izumi traces these symptoms to the three months he spent at Downey Studios in 2004 and 2005 building sets for the science-fiction movie "The Island."
NATIONAL
December 7, 2007 | Judy Pasternak, Times Staff Writer
The Environmental Protection Agency plans to resume long-stalled testing for toxics on the Navajo reservation unleashed by abandoned Cold War uranium mines, but it and four other federal agencies have yet to come up with overall cleanup and health plans, their representatives told seven House members in a closed meeting this week.
NATIONAL
January 26, 2007 | Marla Cone, Times Staff Writer
After the winter thaw, a huge enterprise -- so expensive and risky that it ranks among the most ambitious environmental projects on Earth -- will rise up from an abandoned cornfield in upstate New York. Not far from Saratoga, where Americans defeated British soldiers in the Revolutionary War, 40 miles of the Hudson River will be excavated to remove hazardous compounds discharged by General Electric.
NEWS
November 7, 2004 | Elizabeth M. Gillespie, Associated Press Writer
The toxic goo that seeps beneath wood-treatment plants is hopelessly sticky for good reason: It has to keep water from rotting railroad ties, pilings and telephone poles. There's about 1 million gallons of it lurking in the soil and groundwater along an eastern stretch of this otherwise unpolluted island west of Seattle, making it one of the state's most heavily contaminated Superfund sites.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2004 | Patrick McGreevy, Times Staff Writer
Concluding that Harbor Commission President Nick Tonsich stands to benefit financially from his ties to an environmental firm, the Los Angeles city attorney on Thursday barred the company from competing for a $2-million port grant to reduce air pollution. City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo also disqualified Tonsich from voting on whether to award a separate toxics cleanup contract to the company because it is a client of Tonsich's law firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2004 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
San Bernardino will receive $69 million in Superfund money toward cleanup of contaminated groundwater left behind at an old military base that served as a World War II prisoner-of-war camp.
NEWS
October 24, 1985 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Gov. George Deukmejian conceded Wednesday that his Administration's toxic cleanup program may have violated some U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations but said the state actions were taken to protect "public safety" and characterized a critical EPA audit as "nit-picking."
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Entering a far-reaching, high-stakes environmental dispute, the state Supreme Court agreed Thursday to decide whether the costs of government-mandated toxic cleanups must be paid by polluters or by their insurers. The justices, in a brief order, said they will review one of at least 17 cases that are pending in the California courts raising an issue that has resulted in sharply conflicting rulings by state appellate panels.
NEWS
January 21, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a grisly wound in the earth, the crumbled mine shafts carved deep into Iron Mountain have for decades oozed a toxic stream straight from Dante. This eerie underground world drips with neon green runoff packing nearly the punch of industrial acid. Government scientists indelicately dub it the world's worst water. But now the troublesome mountain could become more than just a notorious symbol of mining's tainted legacy.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
The cleanup at a defunct Northern California copper mine that is ranked among the nation's most toxic Superfund sites will continue as long as needed at no further cost to taxpayers, under a settlement announced Thursday. The agreement with Aventis CropSciences USA could generate more than $800 million for the Iron Mountain Mine cleanup near Redding, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials said.
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