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Toxic Shock Syndrome

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The streptococcus bacterium that invaded the body of a young girl with chickenpox, provoking a toxic-shock reaction that led to the amputation of her arms and legs, has been found recently in other children, medical officials said Friday. Dr. Benjamin Schwartz, with the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, said cases in which "strep" has triggered toxic shock in children have occurred elsewhere in the country recently, although none have been reported in medical literature.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Nan Robertson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter who brought distinction and change to her newspaper through highly publicized professional and personal battles -- one against sex discrimination at her newspaper, the other against toxic shock syndrome, which nearly killed her -- died Tuesday at a nursing home in Rockville, Md. She was 83. The cause was heart disease, said her stepdaughter-in-law, Jane Freundel Levey. A reporter for the New York Times for 33 years beginning in 1955, Robertson was known for her role in a drive to improve pay and career opportunities for women writers and editors, which culminated in a class-action lawsuit settled in favor of the women plaintiffs in 1978.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1990 | Dianne Klein
Paula Alicia Jones had been warned, silently, in writing, about the risks. Nobody can say, now, if the message was ever read. Paula died in April, alone in her bed, two days after coming down with what she thought was the flu. She was 32 years old, healthy, living in Arizona with her husband, Jeff, their 3-year-old daughter, Cassie, and 9-year-old son, Luke.
HEALTH
February 21, 2005 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
Toxic shock syndrome linked to tampon use, which made headlines 25 years ago when the dangerous illness sickened thousands of U.S. women and killed dozens, may be reemerging as a public health threat, according to physicians and other experts. Two leading researchers say the number of cases reported to them by doctors nationwide has increased during the last three years, though the levels are not thought to be nearly as high as they were in 1980, the peak year for toxic shock cases. And a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Friends and relatives of a 16-year-old girl who died of what appears to be toxic shock syndrome are working to raise awareness of the often overlooked bacterial disease. Toxic shock syndrome sickened 814 women and killed 38 during the 1980s. It disappeared after a problematic tampon, Rely, was taken off the market. But some researchers say the syndrome could be making a comeback.
NEWS
April 8, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A woman who used a Playtex tampon died from toxic shock syndrome in what is believed to be the first case reported in the nation this year, a Riverside County coroner's official said Saturday. Tammy Bader McNabb, 21, was admitted to Riverside General Hospital on March 29 suffering symptoms of the disease that has been linked to the use of tampons. She died last Monday, said Carl B. Smith Jr., the county's chief deputy coroner.
NEWS
August 30, 1985 | Associated Press
Mike Adkisson, 21, the youngest of the popular wrestling Von Erich brothers, was in critical condition today at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas suffering from toxic shock syndrome. Adkisson was in the intensive care unit with a 107-degree fever and had lost the function of his kidneys, Baylor officials said at a news conference today. Dr. William Sutker said Adkisson was suffering from toxic shock syndrome, a bacterial infection usually found in women who use tampons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court jury ruled Monday that an Anaheim woman died of toxic shock syndrome caused by the tampon she used but also concluded that the manufacturer is not liable for damages. Several jurors said outside the courtroom that they wanted to award money to the family of Dolores Shea, who died at the age of 30 on Oct. 5, 1989, leaving behind a husband and three children.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Nan Robertson, a Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter who brought distinction and change to her newspaper through highly publicized professional and personal battles -- one against sex discrimination at her newspaper, the other against toxic shock syndrome, which nearly killed her -- died Tuesday at a nursing home in Rockville, Md. She was 83. The cause was heart disease, said her stepdaughter-in-law, Jane Freundel Levey. A reporter for the New York Times for 33 years beginning in 1955, Robertson was known for her role in a drive to improve pay and career opportunities for women writers and editors, which culminated in a class-action lawsuit settled in favor of the women plaintiffs in 1978.
NEWS
January 12, 1986
Discovery of a second bacterial toxin that causes toxic shock syndrome might help doctors diagnose the illness, a researcher says. Dr. Patrick M. Schlievert of the University of Minnesota said the second toxin, known as enterotoxin B, may account for up to 60% of toxic shock syndrome cases in non-menstrual patients. Until now, toxic shock syndrome had been associated only with a toxin called toxic shock syndrome toxin 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Friends and relatives of a 16-year-old girl who died of what appears to be toxic shock syndrome are working to raise awareness of the often overlooked bacterial disease. Toxic shock syndrome sickened 814 women and killed 38 during the 1980s. It disappeared after a problematic tampon, Rely, was taken off the market. But some researchers say the syndrome could be making a comeback.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001
Most hospital Staphylococcus aureus infections--best known for causing toxic shock syndrome--are caused when bacteria lodged in the noses of patients spread out of control, according to a study by German scientists in today's New England Journal of Medicine.
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Valerie Slimp survived life-threatening toxic shock that ravaged her body and disfigured her nose, so this outing to Mervyn's was a critical and symbolic step on her road to recovery. Still, she had to ask her husband afterward, "Do you think anyone noticed my nose?" "Sweetheart," answered Randy Slimp with the kind of levity that has marked the couple's steadfast relationship, "you don't have any hands or legs. I don't think anyone noticed your nose."
NEWS
July 4, 1993 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"To think," says Valerie Slimp, spreading out her amputated arms in bold display, "that a little spider did all this." Medical and entomology experts aren't so quick to blame a spider, though. When the Mira Loma housewife was hospitalized last July with what appeared to be severe flu-like symptoms and her left leg began to discolor, the attending physician speculated about whether she had been bitten by a spider, said Slimp's husband, Randy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY
Citing juror confusion and unclear instructions, an Orange County Superior Court judge ordered a new trial in a suit involving the death of an Anaheim woman from toxic shock syndrome. On May 3, a jury found that Dolores Shea, 30, died as a result of using a defectively designed tampon but that manufacturer Kimberly-Clark could not have foreseen the death. Therefore, the jury awarded her family no monetary damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Orange County Superior Court jury ruled Monday that an Anaheim woman died of toxic shock syndrome caused by the tampon she used but also concluded that the manufacturer is not liable for damages. Several jurors said outside the courtroom that they wanted to award money to the family of Dolores Shea, who died at the age of 30 on Oct. 5, 1989, leaving behind a husband and three children.
NEWS
September 3, 1986 | Associated Press
The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Tuesday overturned an $11-million judgment against International Playtex Inc. in a toxic shock syndrome death and ordered a new trial. The court said that the trial jury in Wichita, Kan., should have been allowed to determine what role the victim might have had in her own death and whether manufacturers of other tampons she also used might have contributed to it. Playtex had appealed the Feb.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1990 | Dianne Klein
Paula Alicia Jones had been warned, silently, in writing, about the risks. Nobody can say, now, if the message was ever read. Paula died in April, alone in her bed, two days after coming down with what she thought was the flu. She was 32 years old, healthy, living in Arizona with her husband, Jeff, their 3-year-old daughter, Cassie, and 9-year-old son, Luke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jessica Lynn Esquivel, the 6-year-old Imperial Beach girl whose arms and legs were amputated after a case of chickenpox led to a secondary infection and then to toxic shock syndrome, has had her condition upgraded to fair, medical workers said Thursday.
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