Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsToxic Shock Syndrome
IN THE NEWS

Toxic Shock Syndrome

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese scientists said last week that they had artificially reproduced a gene that plays an important role in causing asthma, the respiratory ailment that is the most widespread chronic disease in the developed world. Researchers from the University of Tokyo reported in Nature that their discovery could make it possible for the first time to design effective drugs against asthma and other inflammatory diseases.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 27, 1997
Barbara, whose full name was Monique Serf, 67, twice named best female singer of the year in France. The popular soprano had recently canceled performances because of respiratory problems. In 1994, and again this year, Barbara earned a Victoire award, France's equivalent of a Grammy, for best female singer of the year. Her last album, "In Red Letters," was issued last fall. Her most famous song was "Aigle Noir" (Black Eagle).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1985
A Moorpark woman and the makers of Kotex tampons have settled a suit alleging that the product caused the woman to develop toxic shock syndrome about five years ago and has led to a continuing memory problem. Roberta Warne, now 34, became ill in June, 1980, after using the Kimberly-Clark Co.'s Kotex tampons, said her attorney, Robert Herman.
HEALTH
January 22, 2007 | From Times wire reports
A nasty staph germ circulating in the community and some hospitals produces a poison that can kill pneumonia patients within 72 hours, researchers have reported. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria -- staph for short -- can pass one another the gene for the toxin and are apparently swapping it more often, the researchers reported in the Jan. 19 issue of the journal Science. The toxin, called Panton Valentine leukocidin, or PVL, can itself cause pneumonia and can kill healthy tissue.
SPORTS
March 1, 2000 | MITCH POLIN
The referees might have inadvertently provided the Chaminade High girls' soccer team with a motivational tool when they made them remove red ribbons from their hair before the game. The ribbons were in honor of teammate Kristen Jackson, who is in intensive care at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles suffering from toxic shock syndrome and pancreatitis.
NEWS
September 2, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Here's an unusual risk of playing paintball: A British woman's breast implant reportedly exploded after she was hit in the chest by a paintball, which can travel at 190 mph. UK Paintball has now adjusted its policies accordingly. "We respectfully ask that any ladies with surgical breast implants notify our team at the time of booking," according to a statement on its website. "You will be given special information on the dangers of paintballing with enhanced boobs and asked to sign a disclaimer.
NEWS
August 30, 1989 | From the Washington Post
Federal court, accusing the Food and Drug Administration of endangering women's health, has given the agency until Oct. 30 to issue rules requiring tampon manufacturers to place uniform absorbency ratings on labels. The decision, in U.S. District Court here, was a victory for consumer groups that have been demanding absorbency ratings since a 1981 study found that using the most absorbent types of tampons increased the risk of toxic-shock syndrome, a rare but potentially fatal infection.
NEWS
August 30, 2007 | David Ng, Times Staff Writer
JUST how funny you'll find "Invasion! The Musical" depends on your affinity for the kind of humor that appeals primarily to drunk undergraduates. Which is to say, anything involving cleavage, virgins, genitalia, homosexuality and uncontrollable flatulence. Cheerfully obscene, this adults-only musical spoofs the age-old alien-invasion genre.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|