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Trade Barriers

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BUSINESS
March 1, 1996 | JAMES BATES
It was a little more than two years ago that Hollywood was battling Europe's fears that if something wasn't done fast to fortify strong trade barriers, American films and TV shows would obliterate local cultures as they dominated the world's entertainment business. It all seems especially ironic now in a year when the rest of the world's culture is playing well here.
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BUSINESS
August 19, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Don Lee, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- The top U.S. trade official on Monday pressed Japan to open up its auto and insurance markets as he pushed for the completion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. Speaking during a stop in Tokyo, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman said Japan plays a central role in the Asia-Pacific region and welcomed its decision this year to join the talks on a region-wide trade pact. But Froman said negotiators would have to address some remaining barriers for the U.S. and other countries in the Japanese market.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | From The Washington Post
An effort by the world's richest countries to breathe new life into global trade negotiations fell short Thursday as trade ministers from the United States, Japan, the European Community and Canada failed to reach agreement on a package of measures to lower tariffs and other trade barriers. The development marks a setback for the talks, an ambitious effort to liberalize world trade rules that has dragged on for seven years.
NEWS
October 1, 2012 | By Jon Healey
The Times' Op-Ed page featured a cartoon Monday that captures much of the cognoscenti's befuddlement about voters who haven't yet decided whether to vote for President Obama or his Republican challenger, Mitt Romney. Drawn by Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, it shows a man sporting an "Undecided Voter" T-shirt at a fast-food restaurant counter, struggling to decide whether to add fries to his order. "I love fries ... but they're bad for me ... but they are yummy ... but they may clog my arteries ... but they are yummy," the man mutters while the woman taking behind the cash register fumes, "I can't believe the future of our country is in his hands!"
BUSINESS
April 26, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. Ambassador Mike Mansfield called Monday on Japan to join in dropping trade barriers and contribute more to its own defense. Mansfield's remarks came two days after Japanese farmers smashed and burned an American car, torched boxes of U.S. oranges and set fire to a U.S. flag in a rally in western Japan. The estimated 300 farmers were protesting U.S. demands that Japan end its restrictions on imported beef and oranges.
NEWS
January 1, 1985 | GEORGE SKELTON, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan on Wednesday will emphasize "very candidly" to Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone the "urgent need" to lower Japan's trade barriers to U.S. goods but will not push as hard as some advisers have advocated, an Administration official said Monday.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1985 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The United States and Israel signed an agreement Monday to abolish all tariffs and most other trade barriers between the two nations by 1995, the first such U.S. agreement with any nation. The document, the product of 13 months of intense negotiations, was signed by U.S. Trade Representative William E. Brock and Ariel Sharon, Israel's minister of industry and commerce. Israel's parliament, the Knesset, approved the agreement Monday, and U.S. congressional approval seems assured.
BUSINESS
January 11, 1997 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Drawn by cheap Mexican labor and lower trade barriers, a Texas denim processor and jeans maker that is one of the nation's largest Latino-owned companies, plans to open a new facility just north of Ensenada, Baja California, that will employ 1,500. The move by International Garment Processors of El Paso is the latest example of a broad shift of apparel manufacturers to Mexico to take better advantage of the lucrative U.S.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2002 | From Reuters
The United States will propose the elimination of international steel subsidies and trade barriers during talks this week in Paris, a senior Commerce Department official said Monday. The four-point plan comes just six months after President Bush slapped hefty tariffs ranging up to 30% on U.S. steel imports to help domestic firms get back on their feet after a string of bankruptcies.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | From Reuters
Continental Europe is waking up to the realization that it is going to have to live with the hostile takeover bid, just like the United States and Britain. Some of Europe's oldest and most respected firms suddenly appear vulnerable, analysts say. Their stock is cheap since the 1987 crash, and their appeal has been boosted by prospects of the single, pan-European market that the European Community intends to create by 1992.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2010 | Bloomberg News
Wheat rose to a 23-month high in Chicago as Russia, the world's third-biggest grower, banned exports because of the country's worst drought in at least a half-century. Halting shipments would be "appropriate" to contain domestic prices that jumped 19 percent last week, faster than at the peak of the global food crisis in 2008, Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said in Moscow. A government decree signed today bans exports of wheat, barley, rye, corn and flour from Aug. 15 to Dec. 31. "As of today, Russia has no grain market," said Kirill Podolsky, the chief executive officer of Valars Group, the country's third-biggest grain trader.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2008 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
With Fidel Castro stepping aside, California vegetable growers, Alabama chicken producers and Kansas wheat farmers -- not to mention scores of other nonagricultural businesses -- see new opportunity to push for an expansion of U.S.-Cuba trade. America has quietly become the largest foreign supplier of food products to the communist nation, thanks to a loosening of the long-standing U.S. trade embargo against the island nation in 2000. U.S.
BUSINESS
February 16, 2008 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
While some Americans are congratulating themselves on switching to fuel-sipping cars, their old gas guzzlers just won't die. Lowered trade barriers are giving them new life south of the border. Thousands of used vehicles from as far away as Colorado and Missouri jam tiny car lots and auto salvage yards in this gritty border city. An estimated 25,000 families make a living here hustling U.S. castoffs. Among them is Jose Zavala, a wiry used-car dealer with a trucker's cap and an eye for bargains.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The Bush administration Monday accused 63 trading partners, including China and the European Union, of erecting unfair barriers to American exports. U.S. Trade Representative Susan Schwab released the new report, which the administration is required to prepare to inform Congress of its priorities in trying to tear down trade barriers.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
SANTIAGO, Chile -- Chinese competition has put hundreds of textile manufacturers in Latin America out of business. It gave Jose Ramon de Camino Muxi a new start. After visiting China many times in the 1990s, the Chilean entrepreneur was convinced that his family's wool and cotton operations would be shredded by mammoth factories there. But he didn't despair. He decided to let China do his manufacturing for him.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2006 | Marla Dickerson, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. and Mexico have ended a bitter dispute over sweeteners and will begin dismantling trade barriers in preparation for a complete opening of trade in sugar and corn syrup by 2008. The agreement ends a decade of feuding over a sensitive trade issue that had inflamed powerful farm interests on both sides of the border. The accord could affect the pricing on a variety of products, including baked goods and soft drinks. The deal will allow the U.S.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1994
A few years ago, the Japanese head of a high-tech company in Japan went shopping for a state-of-the-art mainframe computer. After weighing many options, he bought a U.S. model. Not long after, he was astounded to find himself summoned to the prime minister's office to justify his purchase. "In Japanese society, this is the most intense kind of pressure, short of being asked to cancel an order," said Pat Loui, a Honolulu marketing consultant who is a friend of the executive.
BUSINESS
March 30, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Bush Administration today accused 35 nations of erecting trade barriers against U.S. products, the first stage of a process that could result in retaliation against countries that refuse to open their doors to American goods. The accusations were included in the 1990 edition of the "National Trade Report on Foreign Trade Barriers.'
BUSINESS
February 15, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
The U.S. trade office pledged Tuesday to use "all options available" to get China to drop its barriers to U.S. exports as the Bush administration tries to shrink a record trade deficit and stem criticism from Congress. China must open its market to more imports, crack down on the piracy of copyrighted movies and software and curb subsidies to exporters in order to cut its trade surplus, the federal agency said in a 29-page review of trade policy toward China.
BUSINESS
December 4, 2005 | Marla Dickerson and Evelyn Iritani, Times Staff Writers
Farming has never been easy in these misty, rugged highlands. But it has gotten a lot tougher for growers like Marcos Munoz Nunez. He once owned 43 acres of farm ground, most of which he planted with long-grain rice. Earnings from that lush, grassy crop paid for his modest house, a small herd of cattle and school fees for his four children. But he went bust after Honduras opened its market to U.S. imports in the early 1990s.
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