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BUSINESS
September 9, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
Motorola Inc., the world's third-largest maker of mobile phones, claimed in a lawsuit that BlackBerry maker Research in Motion Ltd. was stealing its workers in violation of an agreement between the two rivals. Since February, Research in Motion has targeted at least 40 Motorola employees who can't work at the new company without revealing trade secrets, Motorola said in a lawsuit filed Sept. 4 in state court in Illinois' Cook County. Motorola, based in Schaumburg, Ill., asked a judge to bar Research in Motion from using Motorola's confidential information and from soliciting or hiring any Motorola employees.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
State officials have been flooded with more than 20,000 comments and suggestions regarding proposed regulations of a controversial oil and gas drilling technique known as fracking, officials said Wednesday. Members of the California Water Commission voiced concerns of their own Wednesday about whether the state should treat the recipes for some fracking liquids as trade secrets, not to be disclosed to the public. Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals into the ground to break up rock formations and release the oil and gas trapped inside.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
State officials have been flooded with more than 20,000 comments and suggestions regarding proposed regulations of a controversial oil and gas drilling technique known as fracking, officials said Wednesday. Members of the California Water Commission voiced concerns of their own Wednesday about whether the state should treat the recipes for some fracking liquids as trade secrets, not to be disclosed to the public. Fracking, or hydraulic fracturing, involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals into the ground to break up rock formations and release the oil and gas trapped inside.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian and Christi Parsons, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Amid growing evidence that China and other countries are stealing U.S. trade secrets and technology through cyber attacks, the White House announced what it billed as a new strategy Wednesday to protect intellectual property. The strategy, which does not focus exclusively on cyber theft, seeks to improve coordination of existing efforts by U.S. intelligence agencies and the State and Justice departments, but it does not include new penalties or sanctions. Obama last week signed an executive order for the government to share more classified information about cyber threats with U.S. companies that own or operate crucial infrastructure, including dams and energy and telecommunications facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1991
In response to your editorial ("Since When Is News a Crime?" Aug. 17): Your editorial regarding the criminal tracing of calls to the Wall Street Journal suggests that this kind of conduct occurs only in Cincinnati. The same kind of misuse of criminal trade secrets statutes can happen in Los Angeles, and indeed, has. Our client resigned his position with his employer when he learned that his employer's business practices included systematic fraud against various municipalities throughout Southern California with whom this employer had business dealings.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hyundai Electronics Industries Co., its Hyundai Electronics America unit and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said they settled trade-secrets litigation brought by AMD for undisclosed terms, although AMD said they include injunctive relief protecting AMD's trade secrets. The Sunnyvale-based company won a preliminary injunction in Santa Clara County Superior Court to prevent Hyundai from using or disclosing secrets about its flash memory technology.
BUSINESS
April 10, 1997 | Associated Press
Midland, Mich.-based Dow Chemical Co. and Fairfield, Conn.-based General Electric Co. have settled a lawsuit in which Dow accused GE of hiring away workers to steal trade secrets, company executives said. In a joint news release, the companies said they had reached an "amicable resolution" but would not disclose further details. No money was involved in the settlement, they said. GE spokesman Bruce Bunch said the company did not acknowledge any guilt in the settlement.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Lionel, a maker of model trains for more than 100 years, won reversal of a $40.8-million trade secrets verdict that had sent the company into bankruptcy. A Detroit jury in June 2004 found that Chesterfield, Mich.-based Lionel had misappropriated designs from its rival, closely held model train maker Mike's Train House Inc. A federal appeals court in Cincinnati set aside the award and ordered a new trial, saying the trial judge had allowed improper expert testimony.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
IBM Corp., the world's second-biggest software maker, is misappropriating trade secrets related to the Unix operating system, the company that owns the rights to Unix claims in a lawsuit. Lindon, Utah-based SCO Group, which purchased the rights to Unix in 1995, is seeking at least $1 billion in damages. The suit, filed Thursday in Utah state court, contends that IBM improperly transferred elements of its AIX version of Unix into Linux software.
BUSINESS
August 28, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Baxter International Inc., the world's largest maker of blood disease treatments, settled a lawsuit accusing Bayer Corp. and a former employee of stealing trade secrets about Baxter's products. Terms of the agreement weren't disclosed. Baxter had claimed that Gopal Dasari, a former Baxter Healthcare Corp. scientist who joined Bayer in May, had copied files on Baxter's products for hemophilia, cancer and kidney disease.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | Frank Shyong and Andrea Chang
A federal appeals court has ruled that Mattel Inc. doesn't have to pay $172 million to MGA Entertainment Inc. to settle a trade secrets theft claim over Bratz dolls because a key claim should have been dismissed before trial. The ruling filed Thursday by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals is the latest wrinkle in a bitter, protracted dispute between two Southland toy companies: El Segundo-based Mattel, the world's No. 1 toy maker and owner of the Barbie empire, and Van Nuys-based MGA, a little-known company until it introduced Bratz in 2001.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2012 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Driven in part by the global financial crisis, foreign intelligence services, corporations and computer hackers have stepped up efforts to steal technology and trade secrets from American companies, the FBI's top spy hunter told Congress on Thursday. A related threat - illegal sales of U.S. technology - was highlighted when a major military contractor, United Technologies Corp., and two subsidiary units agreed in federal court to pay a $75-million fine for illegally selling embargoed software and components to China that the country used to build a sophisticated attack helicopter called the Z-10.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Scott Collins
CBS tried to shutter ABC's reality series "The Glass House," but a federal judge on Friday said the show will go on. Claiming the ABC series is a "Big Brother" copycat, CBS filed for a temporary restraining order in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles against "Glass House" that would have blocked its Monday premiere. The network had already sued ABC and "Glass House" producers claiming copyright infringement and misappropriation of trade secrets; that suit is still pending.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
As a public policy, denial requires one prerequisite to take root: lack of information. So it's proper to ask whose interests the California Senate was protecting last month when it killed a measure requiring oil drillers to give public notice before fracking. Fracking - "hydraulic fracturing," technically speaking - involves drilling a pipe horizontally into an underground oil- or natural gas-bearing formation and pumping a slurry into the formation at high pressure to liberate the hydrocarbons trapped within.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2011 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Star bond trader Jeffrey Gundlach and his former employer, TCW Group Inc., said they settled a lawsuit over his firing in 2009 and allegations that he stole trade secrets to set up his own firm. The two sides issued a joint statement but did not release terms of the deal. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this article said the settlement pertained to one part of the case. TCW said it covers all claims. TCW, the Los Angeles-based money management unit of French banking giant Societe Generale, and Gundlach were locked in an often bitter court battle this year.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2011 | Bloomberg News
TCW Group Inc.'s expert witness said the asset management firm is owed $81.7 million in "reasonable royalties" from DoubleLine Capital after a jury's finding in September that DoubleLine misappropriated TCW's trade secrets. The use of TCW's trade secrets, including portfolio management systems, would have allowed DoubleLine to avoid risks and delays getting its business operating, Brad Cornell, the witness, told Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Carl J. West on Tuesday. "TCW's trade secrets are based on years, if not decades, of actual experience," Cornell said under questioning by TCW lawyer John Quinn.
BUSINESS
September 26, 1998 | (P.J. Huffstutter)
Two former employees of ETM Entertainment Network have settled their lawsuit accusing the company of misappropriating trade secrets by copying one of their Rolodexes with 7,000 names, officials said Friday. The suit, filed last month in Superior Court in Santa Ana, said the Costa Mesa ticketing firm copied Ralph Dennis Finfrock's Rolodex after he resigned to join a rival firm. Deals of the settlement were not disclosed. Finfrock could not be reached for comment.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Score one for the little guy. In siding with MGA Entertainment Inc. over rival Mattel Inc. in the retrial over who owns the rights to the billion-dollar Bratz doll franchise, a federal jury said the toy giant had not proved its allegations of copyright infringement. What's more, some jurors said they sympathized with MGA's plight as a small company trying to compete with the industry behemoth. "I don't think anyone should be able to bully someone and own everything," said juror Nadine Done, 22. The eight-person jury unanimously rejected Mattel's copyright infringement claims; said Mattel did not own the rights to the dolls, early models or sketches; and said MGA did not steal trade secrets.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2011 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
Toy giant Mattel Inc. can't pursue copyright infringement claims against rival MGA Entertainment Inc.'s sexy Bratz dolls other than the original four and two later models, a federal judge ruled. In the prolonged fight over the ownership rights to the billion-dollar Bratz doll empire, U.S. District Judge David O. Carter on Dec. 27 granted a motion by Van Nuys-based MGA to prevent Mattel from seeking infringement damages over subsequent versions of the dolls, with the exception of two: Formal Funk Dana and Ooh La La Cloe.
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