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Trademark

BUSINESS
February 24, 2012 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles
The iPad trademark battle between Apple and Proview Technologies has jumped from China to the U.S. as a new lawsuit accuses Apple of committing fraud in 2009. Proview's Taiwanese subsidiary, Proview Electronics, known largely for making computer monitors, filed a complaint in Santa Clara County Superior Court on Feb. 17, accusing Apple of hiring the lawfirm Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge to start a company that was formed with the sole purpose of purchasing the trademark for the "iPad" name on its behalf.
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BUSINESS
December 30, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Napster Inc., an online music-sharing service fighting a landmark copyright dispute, sued online retailer Sport Service Inc. for wrongfully using its trademark. Napster alleges closely held Sport Service is selling T-shirts and caps with Napster's cat-design trademark, according to the complaint filed in U.S. District Court in San Francisco. Sport Service operates Napsterstore.com, a domain it purchased in May.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1987 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
IBM has claimed a legal victory over AST Research of Irvine in a trademark infringement suit involving AST's use of the PS/2 trademark that designates IBM's new personal computer line. In an out-of-court settlement, AST agreed not to use PS/2 to promote its new line of products for use with IBM's new personal computers.
SPORTS
May 5, 2000 | BILL CHRISTINE
In 1895, a young architect, taken with a single spire atop a nearby mental institution, designed two spires that were built on the roof of the new grandstand at Churchill Downs. The twin spires, the brainchild of Joseph Baldez, have become the most recognizable feature of Churchill and the Kentucky Derby, and one of the most recognizable landmarks in sports. They've been called towers, cupolas and steeples by visitors to the Derby, but to the locals they can only be the spires.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2010 | By Steven Zeitchik >>>
For a guy who's just seen the end of the world, Denzel Washington is surprisingly upbeat. The actor projects a studied, scowling quiet for much of his new post-Armageddon thriller "The Book of Eli," which makes it a little jarring to meet the actor and find him in an altogether different mode: gregarious, charismatic, Denzel-ish . As he talks about his new role while sipping camomile tea in the lobby bar of a Beverly Hills hotel, he stages a...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
AMAGANSETT, N.Y. - Some actors take a part because they admire a director's vision or love the script. Richard Gere signed on to his new Wall Street cautionary tale "Arbitrage" because he liked how the filmmaker responded when he slammed him against a wall. Gere and Nicholas Jarecki were dining at the upstate N.Y. bed-and-breakfast Gere owns, discussing the actor's potential involvement in the dramatic thriller that opened Friday to strong reviews. Then Gere made an odd request: He wanted Jarecki to read with him as the wife of Gere's character.
SPORTS
November 3, 2003 | John Weyler, Special to The Times
ESPN reporter Michelle Tafoya really knows how to rain on a guy's parade. John Lewis, a Michigan fan, was cheering loudly for his teamduring a game against Minnesota at the Metrodome in Minneapolis when Tafoya thought it would be a good idea to dump beer on his head to cool him off. Tafoya said she was trying to defuse a trash-talking bout between a group she was with and fans in the section below. Then the police showed up.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Google Inc. lost its bid to get European Union-wide trademark protection for "Gmail," the name of its Web-based e-mail service. The Gmail name is too similar to an existing German trademark, according to a ruling by the EU's trademark agency.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2008 | from times wire services
A European Union high court scrapped a trademark for Anheuser-Busch's "Bud" beer name in Europe, handing a victory to Czech rival Budvar. The Court of First Instance in Luxembourg said the EU's trademark agency had "made several errors" in rejecting arguments by Czech brewer Budejovicky Budvar against St. Louis-based Anheuser-Busch's trademark application. The ruling means Anheuser-Busch can no longer claim trademark rights for the entire EU region but must rely on separate national trademarks
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