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Trademarks

BUSINESS
September 7, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
In a legal battle over red soles, luxe shoe brand Christian Louboutin won a limited victory over design house Yves Saint Laurent when an appeals court granted trademark protection for some of its footwear with lacquered red bottoms. The U.S. 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan overturned a lower-court decision by deciding that Louboutin shoes that have red soles combined with a different colored top are protected under trademark, while a shoe design that is red all over cannot be protected, That means Louboutin can theoretically prevent another designer from putting out a black stiletto with a red sole, for example, but not a red stiletto with a red sole.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Ryan Lochte has moved on from the competitive waters of London to the glittery pools of Hollywood. The 28-year-old swimmer descended on Los Angeles this week to film a cameo in the CW's teen soap "90210," hit a few red carpets and even drum up merchandising business. Already a media darling thanks to that smile (complete with patriotic grill ) and washboard stomach, Lochte's even more of a hit for his, um, unique interview presence. "Memorizing lines and trying to like, say 'em and still, like, do movement … it was hard," Lochte told Access Hollywood, via Buzzfeed, about his stint on "90210.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It was 70 years ago that a tiny shop on Venice Boulevard in downtown Los Angeles produced its last motorcycle. At the time, Crocker Motorcycle Co. made the most powerful race bikes of any American manufacturer. But like other small companies facing supply shortages during World War II, it was forced to close, leaving only a few dozen bikes that have become a favorite of collectors and enthusiasts. Steve McQueen owned one before it was sold in auction for more than $276,000. Now the Crocker is back, with a modern, limited-production version of the Big Tank V-twin.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2012 | By Shan Li
--London has overtaken Dubai as the world's prime shopping destination, according to a new report. The British capital attracts the most retail brands among all the great shopping cities around the globe, according to commercial real estate firm CBRE. Last year, London and Dubai tied for first place and beat out shopping hot spots such as New York, Hong Kong and Paris. CBRE said London draws about 56% of all international brands, with Dubai close behind at 54%. In third place is New York, followed by Moscow, Paris and Hong Kong.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2012 | By Shan Li, Los Angeles Times
It was fashion versus fashion as luxury retailer Gucci America Inc. faced off in court against Los Angeles clothier Guess Inc. over a multimillion-dollar trademark lawsuit. In the opening day of trial in Manhattan, Gucci accused Guess of copying its designs in a "complicated scheme" to knock off the Italian fashion company's most iconic trademarks, according to Bloomberg. The saga began three years ago when Gucci, a unit of the French luxury conglomerate PPR, filed suit against Guess alleging the California company tried to "Gucci-ize" its products by crafting logos that closely imitated Gucci trademarks.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING — The Kardashian sisters don't sell their clothing and perfume in China, and you can't buy authentic J. Crew khakis here. But both names are already trademarked by Chinese businesspeople looking to profit from American enterprises that want to tap China's booming retail market. Extortion? Nope. It's called "trademark squatting. " And it's legal in China, where trademarks generally are awarded to those who are first to register them with government authorities. If these and other U.S. companies want to use their own names, they probably will have to pay the Chinese holder for the rights.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2012 | By Shan Li
It's fashion versus fashion as luxury label Gucci faced off in court against Los Angeles clothier Guess? Inc. over a multimillion dollar trademark lawsuit. In the opening day of trial Wednesday in Manhattan, Gucci accused Guess of purposely copycatting its designs in a "complicated scheme" to knock off the Italian fashion company's most iconic trademarks, according to Bloomberg. The saga began three years ago when Gucci filed suit against Guess alleging the California company tried to "Gucci-ize" its products by crafting logos that closely imitated Gucci trademarks, including mimicking the iconic interlocking G pattern that has appeared on numerous Gucci items over the years.
SPORTS
March 24, 2012 | T.J. Simers
From Scottsdale, Ariz. -- Maybe it's Derrick Hall's boundless enthusiasm as president and chief executive of the Arizona Diamondbacks that's so endearing, or his overriding philosophy in life: "Find a way to say yes. " Maybe it's his gift to motivate and to entertain or his imitation of others such as Peter O'Malley , Vin Scully and Jaime Jarrin who are devastating in their accuracy and hilarity. Maybe it's his willingness to be human. When he learned he had prostate cancer, a few hours later he emailed all his employees to inform them.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
Nokia Corp. is taking steps to make sure that you never miss another phone call, text or email alert again: The company has filed a patent for a tattoo that would send "a perceivable impulse" to your skin whenever someone tries to contact you on the phone. According to the patent filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, the phone would communicate with the tattoo through magnetic waves. The phone would emit magnetic waves and the tattoo would act as a receiver. When the waves hit the tattoo, it would set off a tactile response in the user's skin.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2012 | David Lazarus
Luis Campos designs games. Not your app-happy, iPaddy, smartphoney games. Old-school board games and word puzzles. Campos, 79, of North Hollywood figures he's concocted more than 40 games over the years. Two of them are patented and trademarked (although not particularly well known). Another is awaiting patent and trademark approval. So it wasn't entirely a surprise for Campos to have received a letter the other day from United States Trademark Registration Office alerting him that a payment of $375 was due. It was only after he picked his way through the fine print that Campos discovered United States Trademark Registration Office isn't really a government agency and that it offers no guarantee it will actually do anything to protect Campos' trademarks.
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