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NEWS
February 8, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Bernard Rayner, the last pigeon feed seller in London's Trafalgar Square, said he had agreed to a financial settlement with the British capital's mayor, Ken Livingstone, to give up his trade. The matter had been expected to be decided in the High Court. Under the deal, Rayner will receive compensation for loss of earnings. The amount was not disclosed, but a legal expert said: "It's fair to say it's not chicken feed."
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NEWS
June 4, 2013 | By Rick Steves
Can you tour one of the world's most expensive cities for less than a C note? Yes, you can. I did it on the last final day of a two-month trip to Europe . I was in London and with all of my work behind me, I had the freedom to do whatever I wanted. So I decided to test my five free London audio tours in a citywide blitz spanning two neighborhoods, one church and two museums. It ended up being a very entertaining and cheap day, proving that you don't have to spend a lot of money to have a fulfilling experience in this pricey city.
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TRAVEL
May 2, 2004
I enjoyed the article on St. Martin-in-the-Fields, ("A Spot of Tea and British History," April 18) but wondered why the writer didn't point out that it is right across Trafalgar Square from the National Gallery. We enjoyed a rainy day in London by visiting the National Gallery in the morning, crossing the square for the midday concert and lunch at St. Martin's, and then spending the afternoon at the National Portrait Gallery, which adjoins the National Gallery. Altogether a perfect day. Judith Fujita Rancho Palos Verdes I too was enamored with St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
TRAVEL
December 4, 2011
If you go TELEPHONES To call the numbers below from the U.S., dial 011 (the international dialing code), 44 (the country code for England) and 20 (the city code for London). WHERE TO STAY The Goring, 15 Beeston Place, 7396-9000, http://www.thegoring.com . This 100-year-old family hotel just round the corner from Buckingham Palace is run by fourth generation Jeremy Goring. It has a peaceful garden and famous afternoon teas. The hotel's website is so discreet that it doesn't mention that Catherine Middleton and her family stayed there the night before she married Prince William, the Duke of Cambridge in April.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and opposition politicians blamed extremist groups Sunday for turning a carnival-like tax protest into one of London's worst riots this century. Meanwhile, the new local tax went into effect in England and Wales. In London, scuffles erupted when Home Secretary David Waddington inspected riot damage. Four people were arrested. Saturday's protest by 40,000 people in Trafalgar Square went amok when militants smashed windows, torched cars and battled police.
NEWS
July 31, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of towering Victorian monuments to British kings and generals and of huge muscled lions, visitors to Trafalgar Square this summer will find a humble, life-size statue of Jesus Christ. The hairless and beardless Ecce Homo, or "Behold the Man," was unveiled last week on the edge of a corner plinth that has remained vacant since the square opened more than 150 years ago. It is the first in a series of three sculptures that will occupy the space from now until May 2001.
NEWS
May 9, 1993 | Reuters
British officials Friday turned off the fountains in London's central Trafalgar Square after the death of a man from Legionnaire's Disease. The man died last month and two other people were hospitalized with the illness. All three had been in the area around Trafalgar Square and Leicester Square, the heart of the capital's tourist district. "The fountain at Trafalgar Square has been emptied as a precautionary measure," a government official said.
WORLD
January 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
London Mayor Ken Livingstone announced that he had struck a deal to allow limited feeding of pigeons in Trafalgar Square. Livingstone in 2000 banned the feeding and evicted the square's official birdseed vendor. He argued that the flock was a health hazard and that the cleanup cost $160,000 a year. But activists staged daily feedings, saying thousands of pigeons would starve.
NEWS
October 23, 2000 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sir Henry Havelock stands tall in Trafalgar Square, looking resolute despite the pigeon nestled in his bronze hair and white droppings streaming past his unblinking eyes. The British imperial war hero may be unmoved by such indignities, but London Mayor Ken Livingstone isn't. He wants pigeons and generals alike expelled from London's central square to make way for cleaner and au courant attractions.
WORLD
March 16, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
On your mark ? get set ? stop! London is gearing up to host the Summer Olympics next year, but the countdown to the big event has started (or, actually, stopped) inauspiciously with an embarrassing freeze-up of a clock in Trafalgar Square marking the days left until the Games begin. The giant electronic timer was unveiled amid great fanfare Monday evening, with dignitaries and Olympic gold medalists on hand to celebrate 500 days to go before the opening ceremony. But on Tuesday, less than 24 hours later, the clock suddenly stalled.
WORLD
August 23, 2009 | Henry Chu
In most countries, stranding someone on a narrow platform 30 feet off the ground, exposed to the elements, would probably constitute a form of torture. But in Britain, it's art. And thousands of people are vying for a chance to be part of it. Their goal: an hour of fleeting glory atop a patch of prime real estate, an empty pedestal in London's Trafalgar Square, alongside such illustrious neighbors as Adm. Horatio Nelson on his famous column, King George IV on horseback and the inevitable clumps of tourists below.
TRAVEL
May 2, 2004
I enjoyed the article on St. Martin-in-the-Fields, ("A Spot of Tea and British History," April 18) but wondered why the writer didn't point out that it is right across Trafalgar Square from the National Gallery. We enjoyed a rainy day in London by visiting the National Gallery in the morning, crossing the square for the midday concert and lunch at St. Martin's, and then spending the afternoon at the National Portrait Gallery, which adjoins the National Gallery. Altogether a perfect day. Judith Fujita Rancho Palos Verdes I too was enamored with St. Martin-in-the-Fields.
OPINION
April 7, 2004 | Alison Lapper, Alison Lapper is an artist in Britain.
If everything goes according to plan, this time next year I will be fixed to a stone plinth in the center of London -- my naked, pregnant, disabled body on display and exposed to the elements in one of the most crowded parts of the city. I couldn't be happier about it. I have the honor of being the inspiration for "Alison Lapper Pregnant," the large, white marble sculpture by artist Marc Quinn that has just been chosen to go on the vacant fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square.
BOOKS
November 9, 2003 | Norman Birnbaum, Norman Birnbaum, university professor emeritus at Georgetown University, is the author of "After Progress: American Social Reform and European Socialism in the Twentieth Century."
The Cold War and the 20th century are over; new fears and quandaries beset us. George Orwell, however, is still with us. To think of politics in Great Britain and the United States is to recall his legacy. His belief that writing is giving one's word, that politics requires truthfulness, attests to his inexpugnable Protestantism. He bore witness to democracy's torments, intellectuals' responsibilities and history's disappointments.
WORLD
January 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
London Mayor Ken Livingstone announced that he had struck a deal to allow limited feeding of pigeons in Trafalgar Square. Livingstone in 2000 banned the feeding and evicted the square's official birdseed vendor. He argued that the flock was a health hazard and that the cleanup cost $160,000 a year. But activists staged daily feedings, saying thousands of pigeons would starve.
OPINION
April 7, 2004 | Alison Lapper, Alison Lapper is an artist in Britain.
If everything goes according to plan, this time next year I will be fixed to a stone plinth in the center of London -- my naked, pregnant, disabled body on display and exposed to the elements in one of the most crowded parts of the city. I couldn't be happier about it. I have the honor of being the inspiration for "Alison Lapper Pregnant," the large, white marble sculpture by artist Marc Quinn that has just been chosen to go on the vacant fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square.
BOOKS
November 24, 2002 | John Lukacs, John Lukacs is the author of numerous books, including "Churchill: Visionary, Statesman, Historian," "At the End of an Age" and "The Hitler of History."
The military turning point of World War II came in November 1942, 60 years ago, at three different places on the globe. At El Alamein in Egypt, the British 8th Army won a battle against the German-Italian African army and began its march westward. A week later, American and British forces landed in Morocco and Algeria, establishing a second front, eventually clearing all of Africa of German and Italian troops.
BOOKS
September 22, 2002 | GAVIN LAMBERT, Gavin Lambert is the author of several books, including "Inside Daisy Clover" and "The Slide Area," "On Cukor" and "Mainly About Lindsay Anderson."
Although Elaine Dundy divides her life story into four parts, "Waiting to Be Discovered," "Being Discovered," "Discovering Myself" and "Discovering Elsewhere," it really contains only three: life before, with and after Kenneth Tynan, the flamboyantly gifted and costumed British theater critic.
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