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Traffic Management

BUSINESS
November 3, 1996 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's hard to envision if you're stuck in Southern California's weekday commuter crawl, but the land that gave freeway gridlock to the nation is poised to help unclog the freeways.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1990 | LISA MASCARO
Getting a jampacked stream of cars into Anaheim Stadium and easing the growling gridlock around Disneyland might seem a task fit for divine intervention. But this city has turned to a small, space-age computer room in an innocuous office building near City Hall for its traffic miracles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On one wall of the fortress-like freeway nerve center in downtown Los Angeles are half a dozen video monitors that display much of the worst of any given day's freeway traffic in Los Angeles and Ventura counties. At least 1 million cars, trucks, buses and vans move in and out of Los Angeles County every day, flowing in from Ventura, Orange, San Bernardino and Riverside counties onto the L.A. area's network of 27 freeways.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1999 | CAITLIN LIU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting today, traffic on Topanga Canyon Boulevard in Chatsworth and Canoga Park will be squeezed into one lane in each direction on weekdays because of road-improvement work, according to Caltrans. From 8:30 a.m to 3:30 p.m. each day this week, crews will be performing electrical work and removing median islands on the stretch of the boulevard between Sherman Way and Chatsworth Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1988 | DOUGLAS SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
Deukmejian Administration officials Wednesday unveiled the prototype of a computer-equipped car that they hope ultimately will be part of the solution to California's traffic congestion problems. Tests of the car will begin on the Santa Monica Freeway this summer and continue into 1991. The experimental car shown here comes equipped with a dashboard-mounted console that displays an electronic map of Los Angeles city streets warning the driver of accidents and other congestion problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1995 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The California Angels are playing the Oakland A's at Anaheim Stadium. Next door, the Mighty Ducks are facing off against the Toronto Maple Leafs at The Pond. The result: Thousands of cars are heading toward the county's two most-popular sporting venues, creating a potential traffic nightmare. Several miles away, Curt Breusing sits inside the city's Traffic Management Center, scanning the eight video screens before him as he tries to prevent a crisis.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rush-hour drivers may not realize it, and highway officials certainly can't explain it, but Caltrans District Director Jerry Baxter said Monday that Los Angeles County freeways are less congested now than they were in the recent past. The difference overall is slight, and the change is mainly that rush hours are shorter, if not less severe, but Caltrans is excited because it is the first time in a couple of decades that the trend has been toward anything but worse congestion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2006 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
Rosalind Gonzales has lived in her Norwalk house 30 years, raising her two now-adult sons there. She told state officials Tuesday that she's not ready to move -- even though her home might have to be demolished to make room for an expanded Santa Ana Freeway. "I don't want to move," the 58-year-old nurse's aide said. "You just can't throw me somewhere else and tell me to start over again. Life is too short." Gonzales was among more than 250 people who attended a public hearing on the proposed $1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2008 | David Reyes and Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writers
Despite $240 million in improvements to the Costa Mesa Freeway since 1998, traffic is as bad as ever on Orange County's central corridor, and a persistent bottleneck remains a vexing problem for drivers and transportation officials. Congestion on the 55 Freeway between the San Diego and the Garden Grove freeways has steadily increased since the 1990s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2004 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
To repair a freeway system deteriorating under relentless Southern California traffic, state transportation experts are experimenting with a technique that would reduce construction time but create traffic nightmares. Instead of the typical nighttime freeway rebuilding schedule that closes one or two lanes, crews would work around the clock and shut down half the freeway.
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