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Traffic Signals

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
The city will be one of the first in the county to replace a portion of its traffic signal light bulbs with energy-saving units approved earlier this year by Caltrans. Next week, the city will replace 400 incandescent lamps citywide: 283 red lights, 45 red arrows and 72 pedestrian signals. The new LED--light-emitting diode--disks will plug into special adapters that fit into existing bulb fixtures. The technology has not been developed yet for proper use of green or amber lights, officials said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1995 | AARON CURTISS
William Potts never found his way into the history books, but most of us would be lost without him. Or at least stuck somewhere in traffic. Back in 1920, the Detroit cop erected a box with red, yellow and green lights at the intersection of Woodward Avenue and Fort Street to bring order to the chaotic streets of the Motor City. Seventy-five years later, the traffic signal designed by Potts has become the standard by which cities around the world regulate traffic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1995 | MIMI KO CRUZ
Developers will install a traffic signal at the entrance to the new Metro Pointe Shopping Center under construction on South Coast Drive, despite opposition from residents who live nearby. Residents of the Greenbrook neighborhood complained about the signal, saying it would be too close to Greenbrook Drive and create safety problems by causing traffic backups that would block access to South Coast Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1992 | DANNY SULLIVAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I have been noticing that old traffic signals are being replaced with new traffic signals, such as at Fairview Street and Alton Avenue in Santa Ana or East Mesa Verde Drive and Harbor Boulevard in Costa Mesa, to name two. The new signals seem to do the same job as the old signals, and I'm sure they cost a lot of money. I just want to know the reason they change over signals that are already there. The new signals could go somewhere where one is needed.
NEWS
November 16, 1986 | LEE HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Living on 166th Street between Pioneer and Norwalk boulevards "is like living on a freeway," says longtime Norwalk resident Linda Garcia, who has observed about 100 traffic accidents along the half-mile stretch. Garcia recalls such things as speeding cars "ripping down fences and landing in yards . . . one small boy jaywalking and having his leg broken, and another girl being paralyzed after being hit." "It is dangerous," says the 25-year-old Garcia, who has lived in the same house for 23 years.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, Times Staff Writer
The plate-glass window of the Century City Restaurant gives bar patrons a clear view of the crosswalk at the corner of Santa Monica Boulevard and Warnall Avenue. It is the scene, they say, of frequent accidents, the latest of which happened just last Saturday. "The guy just walked off the curb on the other side. He took one step off and that was it--boom," said L. Jerry McCormac, who was in the restaurant at the time and saw the victim just after the collision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1997
Whittier will install a traffic signal at the intersection where a speeding car hit and critically injured a crossing guard. The City Council awarded an $80,000 contract for a signal at Norwalk Boulevard and Orange Grove Avenue near Orange Grove Elementary School. The signal had been approved by the City Council in 1995 but Caltrans funding was not available until this summer, City Councilman Bob Henderson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1989 | TED JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Spurred by the outcry of angry parents, a developer has begun installing a traffic signal at an El Toro Road intersection where a 6-year-old boy died in a collision last month. Residents had urged county officials for months to force installation of a stoplight at the busy intersection. On July 28, Andy Dao was killed when a pickup truck hit the car he was riding in broadsideas it was crossing El Toro Road. The Baldwin Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Workers this week began installing a traffic signal at a busy intersection where two 78-year-old pedestrians were struck by a pickup truck and killed last March. City officials had planned to place the signal at West 19th Street and Meyer Place for more than a year and were accepting bids for the job when the accident occurred. The signal costs about $98,000 and is expected to be activated later this summer, said Peter Naghavi, the city's transportation manager. "I'm happy they are doing it.
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