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Traffickers

NEWS
November 30, 1989 | Associated Press
The Bolivian government Wednesday announced the arrest of a man reputed to be one of that nation's two major cocaine traffickers. Juan Carlos Lisboa Melgar, 35, was arrested Tuesday during a raid on a home in Santa Cruz, a drug-trafficking center 335 miles southeast of La Paz, Deputy Secretary of Defense Gonzalo Torrico said. He said Lisboa, who did not resist arrest, owns the biggest cocaine-processing laboratory ever uncovered in Bolivia. He said it can produce up to 8,800 pounds a week.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In their single biggest victory in the drug war, Colombian police Friday shot and killed notorious narcotics trafficker Gonzalo Rodriguez Gacha, who as a leader of the Medellin cartel waged a campaign of terror to maintain the world's biggest cocaine empire.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | From Times wire services
The government has returned 100 planes seized during a 6-week-old crackdown on drug traffickers, a Bogota daily said today. The planes were part of 375 aircraft confiscated since Aug. 19 when President Virgilio Barco Vargas ordered government security forces to hunt down suspected traffickers and seize their property. The National Drug Council decided that 180 of the aircraft had been used in drug trafficking and turned the planes over to the Colombian air force, the daily El Tiempo said.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Ernesto Samper has raised the stakes in the nation's drug war by calling for an end to the constitutional ban on the extradition of cocaine traffickers and other criminals. The move, which could clear the way for jailed Cali cartel traffickers to be put on trial in the United States, must still be approved by Congress. Analysts say the issue is certain to be the subject of heated debate. U.S.
WORLD
August 24, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
El Salvador's national police chief stepped down after local media reports accused two close advisors of corruption and links to drug traffickers. Two aides to Francisco Rovira resigned Friday after news media reports said one ran a private consulting firm with suspected drug traffickers as clients and the other used police license plates without authorization. "This morning, [Rovira] told me he wanted an open and transparent investigation and that's why I accepted his resignation," President Tony Saca said at a news conference.
NEWS
June 5, 1985 | United Press International
The Interior Ministry fired 427 agents and 19 state commanders of its secret police force following a drug trafficking investigation prompted by the murder of a U.S. narcotics agent. The ministry said the arrests of drug traffickers Rafael Caro Quintero and Ernesto Fonseca, who are charged with the February kidnaping and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena Salazar, prompted the investigation of the Federal Security Directorate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1985 | From Reuters
Two suspected Mexican drug traffickers were killed Monday when their U.S.-registered light plane exploded in mid-air in Colombia's northern department of Cordoba, police said. They quoted peasants as saying the plane burst into flames as it approached a clandestine jungle airstrip.
WORLD
May 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Almanzas slowed down as they drove their black pickup past what they believed to be an army checkpoint in violent northeastern Mexico. They rolled down their windows, they say, so the soldiers could see they were a family. But the masked men in uniform instead opened fire, and two Almanza children, aged 9 and 5, were killed. Fifteen days earlier and just 100 miles away, two promising university students were killed at the gates of their school during an army battle with drug traffickers.
WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
He was one of Mexico's most notorious drug traffickers, embroiled in fights to the death with rival gangsters and the Mexican military. His crude signature -- proclaiming him the "boss of bosses" -- showed up regularly next to the headless bodies of his foes. So when Arturo Beltran Leyva fell dead Wednesday night during a frenzied gunfight with Mexican naval commandos, authorities declared a major blow struck against one of Mexico's meanest smuggling groups. "This action represents an important achievement for the people and government of Mexico and a heavy blow against one of the most dangerous criminal organizations in Mexico," President Felipe Calderon said Thursday from Copenhagen, where he was attending an international climate conference.
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