Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTraffickers
IN THE NEWS

Traffickers

WORLD
December 18, 2009 | By Ken Ellingwood
He was one of Mexico's most notorious drug traffickers, embroiled in fights to the death with rival gangsters and the Mexican military. His crude signature -- proclaiming him the "boss of bosses" -- showed up regularly next to the headless bodies of his foes. So when Arturo Beltran Leyva fell dead Wednesday night during a frenzied gunfight with Mexican naval commandos, authorities declared a major blow struck against one of Mexico's meanest smuggling groups. "This action represents an important achievement for the people and government of Mexico and a heavy blow against one of the most dangerous criminal organizations in Mexico," President Felipe Calderon said Thursday from Copenhagen, where he was attending an international climate conference.
Advertisement
WORLD
July 19, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
At least eight alleged drug traffickers were killed during a raid in a Rio de Janeiro shantytown, police said. A state police spokeswoman said officers were met by gunfire when they arrived at the Minha Deusa slum. The agents seized drugs, rifles, grenades and ammunition, she said. Rio is one of the world's most violent cities and the site of frequent shootouts between police and drug gangs.
WORLD
October 18, 2009 | Associated Press
Drug traffickers shot down a police helicopter during a gun battle between rival gangs Saturday, killing two officers in a burst of violence just two weeks after the city was chosen to host the 2016 Olympic Games. Ten suspected drug traffickers were also killed during the fighting in a shantytown, along with two bystanders, officials said. Bullets flying from the Morro dos Macacos, or Monkey Hill, slum in north Rio de Janeiro hit the pilot of the police helicopter in the leg as he hovered above the shootout, causing the craft to go down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Mexican businessman Ruben Zuno Arce was sentenced Wednesday to two life terms for his role in the 1985 kidnaping and murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena. In December, Zuno, the brother-in-law of former Mexican President Luis Echeverria Alvarez, was convicted in Los Angeles federal court of conspiring to kidnap a federal agent, kidnaping a federal agent, conspiring to commit violent crimes in aid of racketeering and committing violent crimes in aid of racketeering. Calling Camarena's torture-murder "an enormously heinous crime," U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie sentenced Zuno to life terms on both of the kidnaping counts and to 10-year terms on both racketeering counts.
NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Reagan Administration undermined its own war on drugs as it "delayed, halted or interfered" with operations that jeopardized support for its policy in Central America, a Senate panel reported today. The government looked the other way, according to the report, when law enforcement agencies learned that drug traffickers were protected and aided by some U.S.-supported Nicaraguan rebels, members of the Honduran military, Panamanian strongman Manuel Antonio Noriega and Bahamian officials.
NEWS
February 6, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Lehder, a boastful cocaine kingpin of unsurpassed ambition and appetite, is the biggest fish ever netted in the flagging international war against drugs. A devotee of the Beatles, Adolf Hitler and violence, Lehder invested cocaine millions in quest of respectability and political power in Colombia. Denied those goals, he laughed at the law, and he was accused of trailing a cape of bribery, intimidation and murder from the United States through the Caribbean and into backland Colombia.
WORLD
April 2, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Drug traffickers fighting to control northern Mexico have turned their guns and grenades on the Mexican army, authorities said, in an apparent escalation of warfare that played out across multiple cities in two border states. In coordinated attacks, gunmen in armored cars and equipped with grenade launchers fought army troops this week and attempted to trap some of them in two military bases by cutting off access and blocking highways, a new tactic by Mexico's organized criminals.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
A top Colombian drug lord whom the United States has long considered one of the most dangerous smugglers pleaded guilty in federal court on Thursday to trafficking tons of heroin and cocaine into the U.S. Francisco Gonzalez-Uribe had been awaiting trial in New York on charges of running a criminal enterprise dating back at least to 2007 that was accused of shipping loads of drugs to New York and other U.S. cities. Federal prosecutors are likely to seek a sentence of life in prison with no parole.
WORLD
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Five youths were tortured, sprayed with bullets and dumped in an empty lot in Tijuana, where the army is battling a rise in killings by powerful drug cartels. The handcuffed bodies were found a day after soldiers fought drug traffickers in a five-hour shootout in the city. The gun battle killed a police officer and a suspected gang member. "We think this is another message to discourage major blows to organized crime," a spokesman for Baja California state's security ministry said.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|