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Traffickers

NEWS
March 21, 1986 | United Press International
Mayor Edward I. Koch wants President Reagan to pull $100 bills out of circulation because the notes are "the backbone currency of drug traffickers." In a letter to Reagan dated Wednesday, Koch recommended that all $100 bills be eliminated and that a redemption program for the currency be set up. The redemption program proposed by Koch would require those who turn in more than $10,000 in $100 bills to explain how they acquired the currency.
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WORLD
May 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Almanzas slowed down as they drove their black pickup past what they believed to be an army checkpoint in violent northeastern Mexico. They rolled down their windows, they say, so the soldiers could see they were a family. But the masked men in uniform instead opened fire, and two Almanza children, aged 9 and 5, were killed. Fifteen days earlier and just 100 miles away, two promising university students were killed at the gates of their school during an army battle with drug traffickers.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The former boss of slain DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena says the 1985 killing was a game changer, both in how the U.S. worked with Mexico on narcotics enforcement and how the traffickers themselves operated. James Kuykendall, who served as resident agent in charge in the Drug Enforcement Administration's office in Guadalajara in the 1980s, recalled Camarena's slaying after learning that the drug lord convicted in the crime was freed from prison Friday on a technicality.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Two captured men have confessed to killing a popular presidential candidate, the army says, and a congressional leader said he was contacted by Colombia's two most notorious drug lords with a new offer to negotiate. Bogota's half a dozen daily newspapers quoted an army general Saturday as saying the army now knows who hired the alleged assassins of Sen. Luis Carlos Galan, whose Aug. 18 killing led the government to declare war on drug traffickers. But Gen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001
Peter H. Smith's "In the Grip of Drug War Logic, an 'Isolated Incident' Isn't" (Opinion, April 29) seemed to be on track until he suggested that the drug war's proponents simply need to regroup. If the "U.S. government should give top priority to the reduction of demand," what form should such efforts take? More government-approved sitcom scripts on network television? The demonization of cash--another one of Smith's suggestions--has already led to the seizure of assets belonging to innocent people here in the U.S., many of whom have to fight to get back what rightfully belongs to them.
WORLD
July 3, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Fifteen years ago, Sinaloa state's moneyed elite wouldn't give Jesus Vizcarra the time of day. His murky past and reputed personal ties to major drug traffickers kept him out of the top social clubs and business associations. Today the same power brokers who once shunned him are Vizcarra's enthusiastic backers as he emerges as the solid favorite to become governor of the key state. To critics, Vizcarra's election on Sunday would be the culmination of a steady penetration by narcotics traffickers into Mexican political power.
NEWS
October 11, 2009 | Mike Melia, Melia writes for the Associated Press
With a stucco mansion in the hills outside San Juan and four luxury cars, including a Corvette, Wilfredo Rodriguez lived well for a part-time worker on an airport ground crew. U.S. prosecutors say Rodriguez, who wrapped cargo in plastic for American Airlines, built his fortune over the last decade by smuggling drugs aboard commercial flights -- one small slice of the hundreds of tons of South American cocaine that flow through Puerto Rico to the U.S. mainland each year. His arrest last month highlights the challenges for law enforcement authorities on this U.S. Caribbean territory, as traffickers flood the island with drug money and make it one of the most violent places under the American flag.
NEWS
April 16, 1989 | JOSE KATIGBAK, Reuters
As airliners begin the descent to Changi Airport, cabin loudspeakers warn passengers of "severe penalties for drug offenses in Singapore." To make sure the message gets across, visitors must fill out landing cards that warn in bold red letters: "Death for Drug Traffickers Under Singapore Law." Death by hanging is mandatory here on conviction of trading in more than half an ounce of heroin or more than an ounce of morphine. Since capital punishment for drug trafficking was introduced in 1975, 20 people, including 11 foreigners, have been hanged.
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