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Traffickers

NEWS
April 13, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Reagan Administration undermined its own war on drugs as it "delayed, halted or interfered" with operations that jeopardized support for its policy in Central America, a Senate panel reported today. The government looked the other way, according to the report, when law enforcement agencies learned that drug traffickers were protected and aided by some U.S.-supported Nicaraguan rebels, members of the Honduran military, Panamanian strongman Manuel Antonio Noriega and Bahamian officials.
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NEWS
February 6, 1987 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
Carlos Lehder, a boastful cocaine kingpin of unsurpassed ambition and appetite, is the biggest fish ever netted in the flagging international war against drugs. A devotee of the Beatles, Adolf Hitler and violence, Lehder invested cocaine millions in quest of respectability and political power in Colombia. Denied those goals, he laughed at the law, and he was accused of trailing a cape of bribery, intimidation and murder from the United States through the Caribbean and into backland Colombia.
WORLD
April 2, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson
Drug traffickers fighting to control northern Mexico have turned their guns and grenades on the Mexican army, authorities said, in an apparent escalation of warfare that played out across multiple cities in two border states. In coordinated attacks, gunmen in armored cars and equipped with grenade launchers fought army troops this week and attempted to trap some of them in two military bases by cutting off access and blocking highways, a new tactic by Mexico's organized criminals.
NATIONAL
May 15, 2009
They are the elusive foot soldiers of the Mexican drug cartels. They lug heavy, tightly packed bales of marijuana under cover of darkness across miles of terrain so rugged that the Border Patrol has to stalk them by footprint. It is, as one agent put it, "the ultimate hunt." Another chapter in the drama chronicled in Tuesday's Times unfolded after midnight recently in southwestern New Mexico. The area has become a busy corridor for smugglers as other parts of the border have tightened up.
WORLD
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Five youths were tortured, sprayed with bullets and dumped in an empty lot in Tijuana, where the army is battling a rise in killings by powerful drug cartels. The handcuffed bodies were found a day after soldiers fought drug traffickers in a five-hour shootout in the city. The gun battle killed a police officer and a suspected gang member. "We think this is another message to discourage major blows to organized crime," a spokesman for Baja California state's security ministry said.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | United Press International
Mayor Edward I. Koch wants President Reagan to pull $100 bills out of circulation because the notes are "the backbone currency of drug traffickers." In a letter to Reagan dated Wednesday, Koch recommended that all $100 bills be eliminated and that a redemption program for the currency be set up. The redemption program proposed by Koch would require those who turn in more than $10,000 in $100 bills to explain how they acquired the currency.
WORLD
May 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Almanzas slowed down as they drove their black pickup past what they believed to be an army checkpoint in violent northeastern Mexico. They rolled down their windows, they say, so the soldiers could see they were a family. But the masked men in uniform instead opened fire, and two Almanza children, aged 9 and 5, were killed. Fifteen days earlier and just 100 miles away, two promising university students were killed at the gates of their school during an army battle with drug traffickers.
WORLD
March 1, 2013 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING - It was reality television in the extreme. Chinese state television Friday broadcast live images of the last moments of four foreign drug traffickers who were about to be executed for the 2011 killings of 13 Chinese fishermen on the Mekong River. Although the cameras pulled away before the lethal injections, the coverage was unprecedented, unleashing a storm of criticism and debate about the death penalty. Psychologists decried the coverage as distressing to children.
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