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Traffickers

WORLD
March 5, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Five youths were tortured, sprayed with bullets and dumped in an empty lot in Tijuana, where the army is battling a rise in killings by powerful drug cartels. The handcuffed bodies were found a day after soldiers fought drug traffickers in a five-hour shootout in the city. The gun battle killed a police officer and a suspected gang member. "We think this is another message to discourage major blows to organized crime," a spokesman for Baja California state's security ministry said.
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NEWS
March 21, 1986 | United Press International
Mayor Edward I. Koch wants President Reagan to pull $100 bills out of circulation because the notes are "the backbone currency of drug traffickers." In a letter to Reagan dated Wednesday, Koch recommended that all $100 bills be eliminated and that a redemption program for the currency be set up. The redemption program proposed by Koch would require those who turn in more than $10,000 in $100 bills to explain how they acquired the currency.
WORLD
May 5, 2010 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The Almanzas slowed down as they drove their black pickup past what they believed to be an army checkpoint in violent northeastern Mexico. They rolled down their windows, they say, so the soldiers could see they were a family. But the masked men in uniform instead opened fire, and two Almanza children, aged 9 and 5, were killed. Fifteen days earlier and just 100 miles away, two promising university students were killed at the gates of their school during an army battle with drug traffickers.
WORLD
August 9, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- The former boss of slain DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena says the 1985 killing was a game changer, both in how the U.S. worked with Mexico on narcotics enforcement and how the traffickers themselves operated. James Kuykendall, who served as resident agent in charge in the Drug Enforcement Administration's office in Guadalajara in the 1980s, recalled Camarena's slaying after learning that the drug lord convicted in the crime was freed from prison Friday on a technicality.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Two captured men have confessed to killing a popular presidential candidate, the army says, and a congressional leader said he was contacted by Colombia's two most notorious drug lords with a new offer to negotiate. Bogota's half a dozen daily newspapers quoted an army general Saturday as saying the army now knows who hired the alleged assassins of Sen. Luis Carlos Galan, whose Aug. 18 killing led the government to declare war on drug traffickers. But Gen.
OPINION
November 14, 2009
Autumn is the beginning of a dangerous season for the youngest victims of the sex trade. Sports championships, beginning with the World Series in October, are magnets for traffickers. In upcoming weeks, authorities say, dozens of children will be transported as prostitutes to the National Football League playoffs, the Super Bowl and, in the spring and summer, the NBA finals and other tournaments. But these days, along with the teams and the fans, the FBI will be there too. Most Americans have heard about children forced into the sex trade, but the recent arrest of 60 suspected pimps and the rescue of 52 children from organized sex rings across the United States should end the illusion that this terrible crime happens only in other countries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Mexican businessman Ruben Zuno Arce was sentenced Wednesday to two life terms for his role in the 1985 kidnaping and murder of U.S. drug agent Enrique Camarena. In December, Zuno, the brother-in-law of former Mexican President Luis Echeverria Alvarez, was convicted in Los Angeles federal court of conspiring to kidnap a federal agent, kidnaping a federal agent, conspiring to commit violent crimes in aid of racketeering and committing violent crimes in aid of racketeering. Calling Camarena's torture-murder "an enormously heinous crime," U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie sentenced Zuno to life terms on both of the kidnaping counts and to 10-year terms on both racketeering counts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001
Peter H. Smith's "In the Grip of Drug War Logic, an 'Isolated Incident' Isn't" (Opinion, April 29) seemed to be on track until he suggested that the drug war's proponents simply need to regroup. If the "U.S. government should give top priority to the reduction of demand," what form should such efforts take? More government-approved sitcom scripts on network television? The demonization of cash--another one of Smith's suggestions--has already led to the seizure of assets belonging to innocent people here in the U.S., many of whom have to fight to get back what rightfully belongs to them.
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