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NEWS
April 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least five shots struck a Southeastern Trailways bus as it traveled a route used by strike-plagued Greyhound Bus Lines. No injuries were reported, state police said. A bus on the same route was shot at Saturday, and its driver was wounded. State police said the shooting occurred on Interstate 65 between Upton, Ky., and Sonora, Ky., about 45 miles south of Louisville, Ky., as the bus headed from Nashville to Louisville.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
The Interstate Commerce Commission gave temporary approval Thursday to the merger of Greyhound and Trailways, the nation's two largest bus companies. The 5-to-0 vote approving the joint operation of Greyhound Lines and Trailways Lines Inc. came as the Justice Department advised the commission that Trailways qualified as a "failing company" under federal antitrust laws and therefore the merger would not violate those laws.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | from Associated Press
The driver of a Southeastern Trailways bus taking a Greyhound route was shot and critically wounded, prompting strike-plagued Greyhound on Sunday to rule out contract talks until a week has passed without gunfire. "It's an open-and-shut case of terrorism," said Fred G. Currey, chairman and chief executive officer of Greyhound Lines Inc. "We will not negotiate with people who are involved in terrorism." Representatives of striking drivers denied responsibility.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
Greyhound Lines Inc., the nation's largest interstate bus company, announced Friday that it will buy the bus routes and other assets of its last remaining nationwide competitor, the financially ailing Trailways Corp. Fred G. Currey, Greyhound's new chief, whose GLI Holdings Inc. of Dallas on March 18 purchased the entire Greyhound bus system from Phoenix-based Greyhound Corp., said that he applied Friday for Interstate Commerce Commission approval of his acquisition of Trailways.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | from Associated Press
The driver of a Southeastern Trailways bus taking a Greyhound route was shot and critically wounded, prompting strike-plagued Greyhound on Sunday to rule out contract talks until a week has passed without gunfire. "It's an open-and-shut case of terrorism," said Fred G. Currey, chairman and chief executive officer of Greyhound Lines Inc. "We will not negotiate with people who are involved in terrorism." Representatives of striking drivers denied responsibility.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987
After signing final contracts to buy $80 million in assets from the financially troubled bus line, Greyhound Chief Executive Fred Currey predicted that the acquisition would be profitable immediately. Greyhound hopes to fill its job openings with Trailways employees, but those who cannot be placed will receive severance benefits. Greyhound says no city will lose service, but about 41,600 miles of service, or 5.1%, will be eliminated.
NEWS
April 4, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least five shots struck a Southeastern Trailways bus as it traveled a route used by strike-plagued Greyhound Bus Lines. No injuries were reported, state police said. A bus on the same route was shot at Saturday, and its driver was wounded. State police said the shooting occurred on Interstate 65 between Upton, Ky., and Sonora, Ky., about 45 miles south of Louisville, Ky., as the bus headed from Nashville to Louisville.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
"In those days," recalled public television's Jim Lehrer, "little boys would be asked what they wanted to be when they grew up. They were just as likely to say bus driver as policeman--and more likely to say bus driver than airline pilot." The days that Lehrer spoke of Friday after hearing that Greyhound Lines would buy Trailways, its only nationwide bus line competitor, were 30 or 40 years ago when riding between cities by bus was still a principal mode of long-distance travel.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1987
The company threatened to scuttle its merger with Trailways Lines unless the government allows a Greyhound affiliate to immediately take over Trailways' operations. In a filing with the Interstate Commerce Commission, Greyhound said that Trailways could collapse "in a matter of days" unless the two bus lines are allowed to operate together immediately.
BUSINESS
July 15, 1987
After signing final contracts to buy $80 million in assets from the financially troubled bus line, Greyhound Chief Executive Fred Currey predicted that the acquisition would be profitable immediately. Greyhound hopes to fill its job openings with Trailways employees, but those who cannot be placed will receive severance benefits. Greyhound says no city will lose service, but about 41,600 miles of service, or 5.1%, will be eliminated.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1987 | Associated Press
The Interstate Commerce Commission gave temporary approval Thursday to the merger of Greyhound and Trailways, the nation's two largest bus companies. The 5-to-0 vote approving the joint operation of Greyhound Lines and Trailways Lines Inc. came as the Justice Department advised the commission that Trailways qualified as a "failing company" under federal antitrust laws and therefore the merger would not violate those laws.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1987
The company threatened to scuttle its merger with Trailways Lines unless the government allows a Greyhound affiliate to immediately take over Trailways' operations. In a filing with the Interstate Commerce Commission, Greyhound said that Trailways could collapse "in a matter of days" unless the two bus lines are allowed to operate together immediately.
NEWS
June 20, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
Greyhound Lines Inc., the nation's largest interstate bus company, announced Friday that it will buy the bus routes and other assets of its last remaining nationwide competitor, the financially ailing Trailways Corp. Fred G. Currey, Greyhound's new chief, whose GLI Holdings Inc. of Dallas on March 18 purchased the entire Greyhound bus system from Phoenix-based Greyhound Corp., said that he applied Friday for Interstate Commerce Commission approval of his acquisition of Trailways.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
"In those days," recalled public television's Jim Lehrer, "little boys would be asked what they wanted to be when they grew up. They were just as likely to say bus driver as policeman--and more likely to say bus driver than airline pilot." The days that Lehrer spoke of Friday after hearing that Greyhound Lines would buy Trailways, its only nationwide bus line competitor, were 30 or 40 years ago when riding between cities by bus was still a principal mode of long-distance travel.
NEWS
July 30, 1986 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Smarting over the loss of its charter bus operating certificates in California, Trailways Lines Inc. officials Tuesday threatened to take the state to court over what they called the "unfair, unwarranted (and) discriminatory" actions of the California Highway Patrol and the Public Utilities Commission. The Dallas-based company is exploring "every means . . .
BUSINESS
July 7, 1986 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, The Washington Post
When Clara Peraldo goes to the dentist in Bluefield, 33 miles from her home in Welch, W.Va., she boards the bus about 9:30 a.m., usually finishes her appointment before noon and then waits until evening for the only bus going back to Welch. It is 7:30 p.m. by the time she arrives home. "That's the way it is," said the retired schoolteacher. Peraldo lives in a small community in an economically underdeveloped state.
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