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Trance

ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1998 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local technophiles have a potential utopia in Area 51, which has catapulted the Rhino Room into electronic orbit on Tuesday nights. Since late January, EJ (Edward J. Mines) and Brett Robinson of Just Bee Productions have been flashing futuristic Japanese animation on the club's video monitors, projecting psychedelia on lollipop round screens above the dance floor and ensuring a trance-like vibe with resident deejay Sean Rubio of Groove Radio (103.1). Guest deejays include Automatic, a.k.a.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1996 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You are not getting sleepy. Keep telling yourself that. Even if you are in a church on New Year's Eve, seeing a hypnotist. Cindy Layne, who calls herself "the ultimate hypnotist," is among the performers who will appear in neighborhood houses of worship Tuesday as part of the annual First Night Fullerton arts celebration. Others are jazz band Simpatico and surf band the Torquays.
BOOKS
September 22, 1996 | Edward Hoagland, Edward Hoagland has published 15 books, most recently "Balancing Acts." He teaches at Bennington College in Vermont and is the editor of the Penguin Nature Classics series of paperbacks
Nature writing, as we know it, began in the late 18th century when Gilbert White, an English curate living in the village of Selborne, invented the naturalist's essay with a series of formal but endearingly observant "Letters" addressed to two knowledgeable friends. This was about 200 years after Montaigne had fathered the form of the essay itself.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1993 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheer curiosity made her do it. The thought of being freed from a slew of maladies was tantalizing, intriguing, downright riveting: Lose weight. Stop smoking. Reduce stress. Put an end to high blood pressure.
MAGAZINE
July 1, 1990 | MARGO KAUFMAN
WHENEVER I THINK that my job is tough, I get this little reminder from the Universe that it could be worse. As I confessed in a previous column, I have a weakness for the supernatural. Perhaps it's just part of being a free-lance writer, but I'm continually drawn to metaphysically fit folks who have mysterious ways of knowing where my next assignment is coming from. And they keep telling me that being a swami is no bed of roses.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1989 | CRAIG LEE
Steve & Eydie. Sonny & Cher. The Captain & Tennille. Chris & Cosey. Chris & Cosey? This pair of X-rated, industrial-strength English multimedia manipulators probably won't be joining those show-biz couples in any Vegas showrooms in the near future.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | RAY LOYND
"Our Man in Nirvana" is not a parody of "Our Man in Havana," but author/actor Jackson Hughes' trance-channeling chameleon at Theatre/Theater is reminiscent of the early comic inventiveness of Alec Guinness and Ernie Kovacs (who co-starred in the spoofy 1960 "Havana" movie). Hughes' repressed German microbiologist Hans-Georg is a visiting lecturer famous for his discovery that bacteria grows on the cheese of his hometown, Limburg, Germany. During a panel demonstration at UCLA, he falls into a trance, re-emerging as a series of flamboyant spirits who include a Puerto Rican fashion designer who envisions world peace through good fashion sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1988 | ANTHONY PERRY
To the many who fail it, the California Bar Exam is a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. Color it failure in big red letters: in front of friends, family and prospective employers. It's a double-bill of despair: Disgrace and Unemployment.
BOOKS
February 28, 1988 | STEPHEN TRIMBLE
Contemporary natural history writers speak for the Earth. They articulate our neglected connections with the rest of the living world in language, both passionate and thoughtful. Landscape threads through their words and their lives, while their ideas resonate far beyond their immediate subjects. They live. They write. And they forge a voice by doing both. These writers make journeys into the landscape; they enter "the naturalist's trance."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1987
It is a sad day for democracy when the liberals of this nation can construe an erroneous case against those who strive to keep our continent free from communism, and use national television air time to attempt to sway the public's thinking and win votes for the upcoming election. Their demagoguery and hypocrisy is intolerable. Freedom fighters have always been struck down by these gravy-train riders. Our boundaries must be kept free of communism and Marxism at any cost. The hearings in Washington are an assault to every freedom our Constitution upholds.
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