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Transistors

NEWS
December 6, 2001 | Bloomberg News
IBM Corp. says it has perfected a technique for making faster transistors, opening the door to advanced microprocessors. The advance, to be reported this week at a conference in Washington, will make long-sought "double-gate" transistors economical in chip manufacturing within five years, said Bijan Davari, IBM's vice president of semiconductor development. As a result, chip performance probably will improve by 30% to 100%, Davari said.
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BUSINESS
November 26, 2001 | Bloomberg News
Intel Corp. will showcase a new type of transistor next week as the biggest maker of computer chips looks for ways to build devices that are 500 times faster than today's yet don't need too much energy. The so-called TeraHertz transistors, still being researched at Intel and scheduled for release as early as 2005, operate at a speed of 1,000 gigahertz. They generate little heat and will use only about as much power as today's best 2-GHz chips, Intel said.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2001 | Associated Press
Lucent Technologies Inc.'s Bell Labs, the research lab that invented the transistor in 1947, announced the development of a tiny new transistor made of a simple cluster of organic molecules. Although the technology won't be ready for commercial use for several years, a trio of Bell Labs researchers have built a simple logic circuit using a pair of the organic transistors. Most increases in computing speed stem from shrinking the size of individual transistors and the distance between them.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2001 | CHARLES PILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scientists announced Thursday the creation of transistors many times smaller than those found in today's most advanced microprocessors, and which operate efficiently at room temperature. This advance in nanotechnology was heralded as a critical step toward the eventual creation of microchips millions of times more powerful than today's models, that one day will be the backbone of intelligent devices too tiny to be seen by the naked eye.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2001 | DAN HART, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Chip-making giant Intel Corp. has made a research breakthrough that makes a key component even smaller and faster than one the company unveiled just six months ago. The new transistor, the tiny part in a chip that switches on and off to regulate the flow of electricity, is just 20 billionths of a meter thick, spokesman Howard High said Sunday. The device is 33% smaller and 25% faster than those that Intel announced in December, he said.
NEWS
October 25, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the summer of 1948, a tiny electronic device called a transistor--the size of a pencil eraser--was presented to the world at a press conference at the headquarters of Bell Laboratories in New York City. It wasn't much of a press conference and it failed to create a buzz over this invention. Even the hometown paper, the New York Times, managed only a few paragraphs on the event in a column about radio news, giving top billing that day to the radio show "Our Miss Brooks."
BUSINESS
August 27, 1998 | From Reuters
Texas Instruments Inc. said Wednesday its researchers have invented computer chip manufacturing technology that will allow it to build the tiniest transistors ever--several times smaller than now possible. The Dallas-based chip maker said the new technology allows it to build transistors with a length of just 0.07 micron--1,000 times thinner than a human hair--narrowing the distance electrons must travel to make a connection.
HOME & GARDEN
June 27, 1998 | TERRY KOVEL and RALPH KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cut flowers have been arranged and displayed since the days of ancient Egypt. Each era has witnessed arrangements designed to blend with other household decorations. Bowls, urns, bottles and vases have been used to hold flowers. One 18th century container was shaped like a group of leaning vases. It was made to hold two or three long-stemmed flowers in each vase. Epergnes with several hanging baskets were used for displaying smaller flowers and bunches of grapes.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scientists are fine-tuning a new transistor that cranks out computations 10 times faster than existing computer technology. The transistor, under development by federal scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, could benefit everything from computers and cell phones to satellites and toxic-materials sensors. "If you can integrate this with conventional silicon processing, it would mean cheaper, faster, smaller, better," said Paul R.
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