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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As of April 5, parking fees will be suspended indefinitely at the South San Francisco, San Bruno and Millbrae Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations in hopes of attracting more riders. BART and SamTrans officials made the announcement Tuesday. "We're hopeful that the free daily parking will provide an added incentive to help reach and attract the new line's potential market," BART General Manager Thomas Margro said. The daily fee is $1 and the monthly unreserved parking fee is $20.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2010 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
A former transit police officer on trial for the fatal shooting of a passenger at an Oakland BART station took the witness stand in his own defense Thursday, testifying he had little training on using a Taser but was warned of the dangers of confusing it with his handgun — which is what his lawyers insist happened on New Year's Day 2009. Johannes Mehserle, 28, testified about his background and training but did not get to the moment when he shot Oscar Grant III, 22, as the victim lay face down on the Fruitvale subway station platform before court adjoined for the day. The former officer, who is white, resigned shortly after the shooting.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Los Angeles City Council approved a $300,000 loan to the developers of a planned housing project for widening the main access street to the Sylmar/San Fernando Metrolink Station. The loan, which comes out of the city's Proposition C Local Transit Assistance budget, will be repaid either with a federal transportation grant or by the developers, city officials said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2009 | Christopher Hawthorne, ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
The role that train travel plays in the American popular imagination is an increasingly contradictory one these days, somehow deeply nostalgic and symbolic of the future at the same time. Getting from one city to another by train remains a thoroughly romanticized exercise -- a humane relic of a more cosmopolitan and energy-efficient era in transportation. And yet trains have also become a key component of efforts by young planners, architects and politicians to re-imagine or revivify American urbanism, with separate piles of federal and state funds -- in California's case, nearly $10 billion -- already earmarked for a network of new high-speed rail links.
REAL ESTATE
April 10, 2005 | Associated Press
A bill that could mean hundreds of new apartments near Bay Area Rapid Transit stations and other rail lines across California narrowly cleared its first legislative hurdle Wednesday. The measure, approved 4-3 by the Senate Local Government Committee, would let urban and suburban developers build multistory houses near transit stations under certain conditions without city council votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Transit planners Wednesday picked neighborhoods in Covina, North Hollywood and around Wilshire Boulevard for a study on the effects of development around transit stops. The study, commissioned by a partnership between the MTA and the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, will look at how the creation of more housing and businesses around existing rail stations could alter demographics, jobs and transit use. The study will serve as a guide for development around transit stations countywide.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2000
Rail construction has been a big waste of taxpayer monies, but now that we've got transit stations, let's encourage development in the areas around them ["Transit Village as Wave of Future," Oct. 3]. Transit villages will generate revenue for the MTA--perhaps even enough to allow them to end the strike and pay their drivers a fair wage. I was dismayed to read about the inclusion of large amounts of parking at existing and planned transit village projects. While some parking may be inevitable, is it really "transit oriented" if it has several hundred parking spaces?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1994 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a heated debate between San Fernando Valley and South Los Angeles lawmakers, the Los Angeles City Council voted Wednesday to include the Van Nuys Metrolink station in a $1.6-million study on transit planning and economic development. The study, funded by a Metropolitan Transportation Authority grant, was originally designed to focus on the planned development of businesses around eight proposed bus and rail transit stations in Hollywood, the Eastside and South Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writers
TV cameras in tow and champagne at the ready, a dozen of the county's most powerful civic leaders -- including the mayor of Los Angeles, L.A. City Council members and county supervisors -- touted the latest and glitziest new development in Hollywood: the planned W Hotel and apartments at the storied corner of Hollywood and Vine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1993 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Los Angeles enters its new era of subways and commuter trains, city government moved Thursday to encourage intensified housing and commercial development near transit stations while seeking to preserve adjacent neighborhoods of single-family homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2008 | Mike Boehm
Architect Cesar Pelli and his firm have landed a $105-million contract to design the Transbay Transit Center, a $1.2-billion bus and rail terminal in downtown San Francisco. In the 81-year-old Pelli's concept, trains arrive underground, buses carrying commuters to and from the East Bay board and debark four stories above street level to avoid clogging local traffic, and the glassed-in structure, being touted by the public authority that's building it as the "Grand Central of the West," is capped by a 5.4-acre rooftop park.
TRAVEL
October 28, 2007 | Janet Stobart, Reuters Associated Press
1 Britain Beginning Nov. 14, Euro- star trains will depart for Paris and Brussels from the glamorous new international terminal at St. Pancras in north-central London. And they will run even faster. As planners began to prepare the city's infrastructure for the 2012 Olympic Games, the present Eurostar terminal at Waterloo was deemed too far from connections to central London and main lines to the rest of the country. The Victorian St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Francisco Vara-Orta, Times Staff Writers
TV cameras in tow and champagne at the ready, a dozen of the county's most powerful civic leaders -- including the mayor of Los Angeles, L.A. City Council members and county supervisors -- touted the latest and glitziest new development in Hollywood: the planned W Hotel and apartments at the storied corner of Hollywood and Vine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2007 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
The MTA has TVs blasting ads at bus riders. It has ads wrapping around hundreds of buses. Now, in another attempt to generate cash, the transit agency has allowed McDonald's to transform Metro Rail's biggest subway terminal into a massive ad campaign for the company's new Angus burger. The 7th Street/Metro Center station in downtown Los Angeles is plastered with huge pictures of the burger -- on walls, ceilings, lining the columns.
REAL ESTATE
April 10, 2005 | Associated Press
A bill that could mean hundreds of new apartments near Bay Area Rapid Transit stations and other rail lines across California narrowly cleared its first legislative hurdle Wednesday. The measure, approved 4-3 by the Senate Local Government Committee, would let urban and suburban developers build multistory houses near transit stations under certain conditions without city council votes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2004 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Robert Sayegh is a car-owning Angeleno who rarely drives. The 36-year-old jewelry maker, who lives upstairs from Metro Red Line's Hollywood and Western station, commutes by subway to his downtown job. With so many shops near his home, running errands is often just a stroll across the street. He almost never uses his car on weekdays anymore. "Everything you need, you have it all around," said Sayegh, spreading his arms as if bear-hugging his apartment complex, which opened about a year ago.
NEWS
January 29, 2001 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every weekday morning, Edward Robinson sees them, cruising slowly and ever-watchfully, like motorized land sharks in search of a meal. Before dawn, they begin converging on the busy transit terminal here, these frustrated Marin County commuters in their Land Rovers and minivans--scouting out free parking spaces before hopping a high-speed ferry to jobs in San Francisco, a 30-minute ride away. By 8 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2004 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
Robert Sayegh is a car-owning Angeleno who rarely drives. The 36-year-old jewelry maker, who lives upstairs from Metro Red Line's Hollywood and Western station, commutes by subway to his downtown job. With so many shops near his home, running errands is often just a stroll across the street. He almost never uses his car on weekdays anymore. "Everything you need, you have it all around," said Sayegh, spreading his arms as if bear-hugging his apartment complex, which opened about a year ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | Jia-Rui Chong, Times Staff Writer
Seven poets jumped on the Gold Line train To banish the afternoon gloom. It's National Poetry Month, they said. We're here to spice your trip with verse. Singing bards on board, now this was a first. * The sound of sonnets replaced the usual silence aboard the commuter train Thursday, with Southern California poets reading as part of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Poetry in Motion project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
As of April 5, parking fees will be suspended indefinitely at the South San Francisco, San Bruno and Millbrae Bay Area Rapid Transit System stations in hopes of attracting more riders. BART and SamTrans officials made the announcement Tuesday. "We're hopeful that the free daily parking will provide an added incentive to help reach and attract the new line's potential market," BART General Manager Thomas Margro said. The daily fee is $1 and the monthly unreserved parking fee is $20.
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