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Transportation Management Associations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
After stewing just one week in rush-hour traffic, Eric DeWaele was ready to quit his new job. The Palmdale resident was spending two hours every morning and another two hours every night staring at the procession of brake lights in his crawl to and from his job in Woodland Hills' Warner Center. "It was mental abuse," said DeWaele, 25, a customer service representative at a mortgage lending company. "I couldn't take it anymore."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 2003 | Caitlin Liu, Times Staff Writer
After stewing just one week in rush-hour traffic, Eric DeWaele was ready to quit his new job. The Palmdale resident was spending two hours every morning and another two hours every night staring at the procession of brake lights in his crawl to and from his job in Woodland Hills' Warner Center. "It was mental abuse," said DeWaele, 25, a customer service representative at a mortgage lending company. "I couldn't take it anymore."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of the most common excuses for not car-pooling: "I can't ride-share because I need my car during the day to run errands." A coalition of businesses in Woodland Hills is eliminating that excuse with a novel concept: providing rental cars that their car-pooling employees can use during the day for business or personal use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1993 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's one of the most common excuses for not car-pooling: "I can't ride-share because I need my car during the day to run errands." A coalition of businesses in Woodland Hills is eliminating that excuse with a novel concept: providing rental cars that their car-pooling employees can use during the day for business or personal use.
NEWS
September 3, 1992
Commuter Group Studied Faced with nearly 100,000 commuters arriving each workday, the city and the Chamber of Commerce plan to join forces to gauge the interest of businesses in forming a transportation coalition. Since 1980, cities throughout California have formed local transportation management associations to help businesses deal with commuting employees and air-quality regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1988
Twenty major employers in the area of John Wayne Airport are trying to form their own transportation management group and promote car-pooling, bus ridership and staggered work hours to reduce traffic. Representatives of Baxter Healthcare Corp., AT&T, the Koll Co., Shiley Laboratories and Allergan Pharmaceuticals voted unanimously Wednesday to have the Industrial League of Orange County coordinate efforts to develop proposed goals and an association budget.
NEWS
September 27, 1990 | CAROLINE LEMKE
Although most transportation management associations are designed to assist employers in setting up a ride-sharing program for their company, any individual interested in ride-sharing can call the organizations listed below for information. Commuter Computer Phone: 237-POOL. Commuter Computer provides information to individuals and employers on alternatives to commuting alone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1995 | STEVE RYFLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bus riders in Glendale and Burbank are being asked to help put together a blueprint for future transit routes at a series of public hearings this week. The Arroyo Verdugo Transportation Coalition is studying bus routes throughout the area known as the Arroyo Verdugo Corridor in hopes of improving service and boosting ridership, officials said.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | DENNIS ROMERO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an unusual move that would give Santa Monica authority usually assumed by the South Coast Air Quality Management District, the city is preparing an ordinance under which local businesses that do not require employees to car-pool would be fined. Although the AQMD allows cities to develop their own regulations, Santa Monica's city staff said only Irvine and Santa Monica have considered such measures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
In an innovative attempt to ease the crush of traffic, Santa Monica is proposing that employers and developers be charged for employees who drive to work. Developers who want to build in the city would pay up to $3,000 per rush-hour car trip generated by new projects. And all businesses already operating in Santa Monica would pay annual "traffic mitigation" fees of $6 to $10 per employee. Those fees could be reduced for employers who institute traffic-saving measures.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
In an innovative attempt to ease the crush of traffic, Santa Monica is proposing that employers and developers be charged for employees who drive to work. Developers who want to build in the city would pay up to $3,000 per rush-hour car trip generated by new projects. And all businesses already operating in Santa Monica would pay annual "traffic mitigation" fees of $6 to $10 per employee. Those fees could be reduced for employers who institute traffic-saving measures.
NEWS
August 23, 1989 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, Times Staff Writer
A behind-the-scenes effort by development interests to modify an $18.5-billion transportation program has environmentalists and a legislative architect of the plan worried that the changes could unravel the unprecedented agreement. The source of the latest concern is a little-noticed provision in the massive transportation program that places a major new responsibility on large developers to reduce traffic congestion.
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