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Transportation Routes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1995 | KAREN D'SOUZA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's most extensive bus route change in three decades begins Sunday, including the elimination of four routes and the addition of smaller buses called runabouts on eight new community routes. "We've been working really hard to get the word out but people still have a lot of questions," said Dee Traverzo, a spokeswoman for the Orange County Transportation Authority. "This is by far the biggest route change we've had in 35 years."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2014 | Laura J. Nelson
The crunch of a bulldozer biting into a Crenshaw Boulevard school signaled the start of heavy construction Tuesday on the latest addition to Los Angeles' steadily expanding rail network, a light-rail line that will connect the Mid-City area to the South Bay by the end of the decade. The 8.5-mile Crenshaw/LAX Line will be the first new rail service in a generation to traverse transit-dependent South Los Angeles, increasing connections to a train system that now reaches to Long Beach, the Westside, the San Fernando Valley and the San Gabriel Valley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | EMI ENDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan and Olympic gold medalist Janet Evans on Wednesday unveiled the route for the Olympic torch relay, which will start at the Los Angeles Coliseum, site of the 1932 and 1984 Olympics. The torch will arrive in Los Angeles from Greece on April 27 and be lighted at the Coliseum, "where it last touched American soil," said David Emanuel of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 2012 | Dan Weikel
In a stern directive late last week, state regulators ordered Expo Line officials to replace a flawed piece of track that could trigger a derailment and also fix an automated safety system that has not worked properly since the line opened in April. The California Public Utilities Commission cited problems with a short length of rail called a "frog" at Washington Boulevard and Flower Street, where the Expo Line and the Blue Line merge near downtown Los Angeles. A frog is a piece of track no longer than a couple of feet that helps guide train wheels through a switch connecting one set of rails to another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1991 | TINA ANIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the age of the customized commuter. At least, that's the vision of Rapid Transit District officials. In the latest move to encourage more drivers to leave their cars at home, the RTD announced Tuesday a computerized planning service that gives commuters a tailor-made schedule for taking the bus from home to work and back. "It's a whole new way of reaching out and touching someone," RTD spokesman James Smart said at a news conference Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The county's toll road agency will spend $16.5 million to start designing a highway route that some conservationists predict will wreak more environmental damage than any other Orange County toll road to date.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA and DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In Costa Mesa, Emulex Corp. says its business has been disrupted by heightened security at local airports. The company has found it harder to find a shipper for its computer components and has had up to a week's delay in deliveries. In Hong Kong, shippers howl at 70-cent-a-pound surcharges imposed by air cargo carriers to Europe who can no longer overfly the Mideast. Elsewhere, companies complain as prices to ship goods by sea or air climb and military shipping requirements strain capacity.
NEWS
January 16, 2000 | SALLY ANN CONNELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an effort to open up the Central Coast to more rail traffic, newer and faster trains are being added to the most popular rail line in California. The ocean has always been the visual highlight of riding the San Diegans route between San Diego and San Luis Obispo, so the train will be renamed the Pacific Surfliner in April with the arrival of double-decker trains. "The new name is really a nod to the entire coast," said Dominick Albano, an Amtrak spokesman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What Pasadena voters decide Tuesday could drive the pedal to the metal on the proposed Long Beach Freeway extension or send it skidding into a political SigAlert. They will cast ballots on two competing ballot measures that will determine whether Pasadena opposes the $1.4-billion project that would slice through its leafy west side as well as South Pasadena and El Sereno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 2007 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to end a decades-old standoff over freeway expansion, Los Angeles County transportation officials are set to take a small but significant step today toward tunneling under South Pasadena to connect the 710 and 210 freeways. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority board is expected to give the go-ahead for preliminary engineering and technical studies for building an underground freeway. A vocal group of South Pasadena residents opposes any effort to close a 6.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2012 | Ari Bloomekatz
For some, the opening of the Expo light rail line means an easier commute to work or school. For others, it's a chance to ride mass transit to Staples Center or to visit the museums in Exposition Park. But for Ayanna White, a 31-year-old mother of four, including 3-year-old twin boys, the new rail line could give her something precious -- an extra hour of sleep each morning. "It means a lot. To you, maybe not, but to me it means the world," said White, who lives within walking distance of the line's current western terminus at La Cienega and Jefferson boulevards.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2011 | Paul West
Rick Perry launched his Texas gubernatorial campaign in 2002 with an idea that he hoped would become his legacy: a 4,000-mile-long, 21st century transit network on which motorists would drive 90 mph on toll roads 10 lanes wide, high-speed trains would hum alongside, and there would be room for electric power lines, broadband fiber and pipes to pump oil, natural gas and water to a rapidly growing state. Perry called it the Trans-Texas Corridor, and advertised his blueprint as "bold" and "visionary" -- a "plan as big as Texas and as ambitious as our people.
NATIONAL
January 16, 2011 | Richard Fausset
The extent to which modern, multicultural and ever-morphing Atlanta can be considered a "Southern" city is one of its richest and most mystifying questions. At times the metropolis feels most comfortable wearing its Southernness in quotation marks: At the Heirloom Market BBQ, the pulled pork comes marinated in Korean gochujang chile paste. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has declared the dish an unqualified hit. But this month, the city proved quintessentially Southern in its inability to deal with 5 inches of lingering snow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Dan Weikel
The $2.25 billion in federal stimulus funds awarded this week to the California high-speed rail project ensures that construction can proceed on a 520-mile route between Anaheim and San Francisco within three years, rail officials said Thursday. Mehdi Morshed, executive director of the California High-Speed Rail Authority, said the infusion of federal dollars would pay for completion of the project's engineering and environmental reviews and provide a significant amount of seed money to start building the system by September 2012, as required by the federal grant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2010 | By Ari B. Bloomekatz
The long-delayed Expo Line was recently dealt another setback when authorities revoked a permit that allowed construction 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Authorities said they revoked the permit last week because of complaints about noise during late-night construction on the line. The move could further delay construction, which is already more than a year behind schedule, and add to the $862-million price tag to complete the first segment from downtown Los Angeles to Culver City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2009 | By Ari B. Bloomekatz
A new light-rail system through South Los Angeles and the South Bay was approved by transit officials Thursday, but some local politicians and residents worry that the rail line could pose similar problems that have hampered other projects. The 8 1/2 -mile line is the biggest beneficiary to date of Measure R, the half-cent sales tax for transportation projects that L.A. County voters approved last year. Metropolitan Transportation Authority officials said Measure R revenues would provide most of the estimated $1.7 billion needed for the Crenshaw/LAX Transit Corridor Project, which would pay for a relatively bare-bones version of the line.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the largest airline alliance in history, British Airways on Tuesday said it will invest $750 million in USAir, giving the British carrier a long-sought foothold in the U.S. market while providing its struggling partner with a badly needed financial boost. The deal, which requires the approval of the U.S. and British governments and company stockholders, would create the most formidable entry so far in a worldwide race among airlines seeking growth and profits through international expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1990 | RONALD L. SOBLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An investigation into last year's record cocaine seizure at a Sylmar warehouse shows that Colombian drug cartels have shipped vast quantities of cocaine along America's interstate highway system despite law enforcement efforts to choke it off, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2009 | By Ari B. Bloomekatz
A long-awaited geological study for a proposal to complete the 710 Freeway as a tunnel under either the San Gabriel Valley or northeast Los Angeles found that such a project would be scientifically feasible. The findings mark a small step in what even supporters say is a long road for the tunnel idea, which was proposed by transportation officials and some politicians after residents fought for decades against completing the 710 as an above-ground freeway. The tunnel has also generated opposition, and building it would be significantly more expensive than a regular freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
Building a subway through the Westside has been the Holy Grail of transportation planners for decades, and many feel they are closer to tunneling than ever before. Backers envision subway cars packed with shoppers balancing Prada and Barneys bags after Beverly Hills shopping excursions and surfers with their boards tucked under their arms heading for the morning waves, as well as workers. But now, as Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa has pushed to fast-track the long-delayed Westside subway extension, there is debate about whether the route for the roughly $5-billion project gets the most bang for the buck.
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