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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 2009 | Dan Weikel
Retired Rear Adm. David M. Stone, who once headed the Transportation Security Administration and was the first federal security director at Los Angeles International Airport in the critical months after the 9/11 terrorist attacks, has died. He was 57. Stone's untimely death occurred over the weekend, several days after attending an awards ceremony for TSA employees in Arlington, Va., agency officials said. He had traveled to the event from his home in Bangalore, India, where he worked for Cisco Systems Inc. as a senior executive in charge of safety and security.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times travel editor
How much is it worth to you to get through airport security faster? Most people would pay about $50, according to a Harris Poll released Thursday. Unfortunately for those folks, the Transportation Security Administration's PreCheck program, which allows expedited screening for prequalified passengers, charges $85 for five years of "fast pass" screening. The misapprehension may stem from this finding: 41% of respondents said they had never heard of PreCheck. Those are among the notions about the TSA and its procedures and programs that the survey of 2,234 adults revealed.
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NATIONAL
April 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
There is more turbulence at the agency charged with airport security: The Transportation Security Administration is losing its third director in as many years. TSA chief David M. Stone will leave the job in June, spokesman Mark Hatfield said Friday. No reason for the move was provided and no replacement was announced. The change comes as the new Homeland Security secretary, Michael Chertoff, is considering restructuring the entire department, which includes TSA.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
A South Bay woman who sued the Transportation Security Administration over the way agents treated her for trying to bring breast milk on a plane said she won a settlement. The woman, Stacey Armato, said the TSA agreed to pay her $75,000 to settle the suit, as well as retraining all screeners to better treat travelers carrying breast milk. "That's a big deal," she said in an interview. "I expect a lot of changes. " TSA officials declined to comment, saying the settlement has not been finalized and the agency still has 30 days to request a dismissal.
NEWS
June 3, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm
The interview for admittance into the Global Entry program was Monday (today) at the LAX Customs and Border  Protection office. I learned some things that might help you if you hope to become a Trusted Traveler , especially about where, exactly, that Customs and Border office is, so keep reading. Previous blog posts have detailed some of the steps to getting into the program, which allows you to whisk through the Customs process when you return to the country. My goal, though, is to speed through airport security, which is a related benefit.
TRAVEL
June 12, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Travelers usually try to get in and get out of Los Angeles International Airport as quickly as possible. Who wouldn't? But in their haste, here are 25 things they might have missed: Full-body scanners were deployed late last year after it was revealed that contraband items were slipping past Transportation Security Administration screeners. LAX has 22 of the big machines, each monitored by a worker in a separate room so the revealing images remain out of view. If a luggage scanner alarm goes off, a yellow bar on the monitor directs a TSA worker to the area in the luggage where the suspicious material is. Chocolate and cheese commonly trigger the machines, because the two foods have the same density as explosives.
TRAVEL
September 30, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
It's a Thursday evening, and the landing lights of incoming LAX flights glow like torches from Westchester to the San Gabriels. Torch one, 200 lives suspended in air. Torch two, 500. Torch three, 350 awaiting their return to loved ones, bosses, business meetings, auditions and, for many, the soul-saving comfort of their own pillows. This high-wire act is more than just symbolic of the seventh-busiest airport in the world. It speaks to the risks involved, the importance of procedure, the crushing, timed-to-the-minute routine.
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Catharine M. Hamm, Los Angeles Times Travel editor
Travelers who want to complete their applications for expedited airport security screening may do so beginning Wednesday in Glendale, Carson and Signal Hill, the Transportation Security Administration has announced. For $85, the TSA is offering travelers a chance to apply for its PreCheck program , which excuses fliers from having to remove their shoes, belt and jacket and allows them to keep their laptop and their liquids in their hand luggage. It does not exempt them from regulations regarding prohibited items.
OPINION
March 4, 2002
Even though it was a serious subject, I had to laugh at a part of your March 1 report, "Security Breach Closes Half of LAX." It stated, "Before the Transportation Security Administration assumed control, American Airlines maintenance employees would have checked security equipment, including magnetometers and X-ray machines . . . each morning." But since the Transportation Security Administration assumed control, "it is unclear whose job that is." This must be big government at its worst.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | By Kate Mather, Joseph Serna and James Rainey
The dark of night still draped San Jose Mineta International Airport when a 15-year-old boy from nearby Santa Clara made his way on to a secure airport ramp and toward a Hawaiian Airlines Boeing 767, then disappeared. The slight teenager, first seen on a security camera video, would not appear again until late Sunday morning, when airline workers spotted him, 2,350 miles to the west, wandering on another tarmac, this one at Kahului Airport on the island of Maui. In the interim, authorities say, the boy survived a perilous 5 1/2-hour odyssey - weathering frigid temperatures, oxygen deprivation and a flight compartment unfit for human habitation - as he traveled over the Pacific Ocean in the wheel well of a Hawaiian Airlines jet. The transoceanic misadventure left authorities questioning both how the stowaway so easily gained access to the jumbo jet and how he survived with so little apparent trauma.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
The lessons learned from the emergency response to last November's deadly shooting at Los Angeles International Airport will be reviewed Friday during a congressional committee hearing at LAX. The shooting raised immediate questions about airport security and emergency reponse, prompting in-depth evaluations of communication systems, crowd-control measures, evacuation procedures and when paramedics may enter active shooter situations. This week, a Transportation Security Administration report recommended -- among many things -- an increased police presence at ticket counters and screening areas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Dan Weikel and Kate Mather
How best to station armed law enforcement officers at airports was the focus of a congressional hearing at Los Angeles International Airport on Friday, one of several reviews of the emergency response to November's shooting rampage that left a federal security agent dead. During a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Transportation Security, contrasting views were presented in the aftermath of a decision at LAX early last year to shift police from fixed positions at passenger screening areas to roving patrols.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
Months after an airport screener was killed in a shooting rampage at Los Angeles International Airport, a new report concludes that adding more security measures at the nation's airports may not be worth the cost. The study goes on to suggest that it might even make sense to relax some of the existing security tactics. “It may be time to reduce security,” said John Mueller, a professor of political science at Ohio State University who co-authored the report with Mark G. Stewart, a civil engineering professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2014 | By Hugo Martín
Months after an airport screener was killed in a shooting rampage at Los Angeles International Airport, a new report concludes that adding more security measures at the nation's airports may not be worth the cost. The study goes on to suggest that it might even make sense to relax some of the existing security tactics. "It may be time to reduce security," said John Mueller, a professor of political science at Ohio State University who wrote the report with Mark G. Stewart, a civil engineering professor at the University of Newcastle in Australia.
OPINION
February 20, 2014 | By Gary Hart and Norman Augustine
In February 2001, a bipartisan federal commission on which we served warned that terrorists would acquire weapons of mass destruction and mass disruption. "Attacks against American citizens on American soil, possibly causing heavy casualties, are likely over the next quarter-century," the Hart-Rudman Commission said. "In the face of this threat, our nation has no coherent or integrated governmental structures. " We added: "Congress should rationalize its current committee structure so that it best serves U.S. national security objectives.
OPINION
November 17, 2010
Would you rather pose for a nude photograph or be groped by a federal employee? To hear many fliers these days, those are the only two choices for air passengers as the Transportation Security Administration installs full-body scanners at airports and introduces a more invasive pat-down technique that some have likened to sexual molestation. We're not wild about the new methods either, but they're a necessary evil in the era of suicide bombers who board planes with chemical explosives in their underwear.
BUSINESS
August 5, 2008 | From Bloomberg News
The Transportation Security Administration suspended Verified Identity Pass Inc. from enrolling travelers in its pre-screening program after a laptop containing the records of 33,000 people went missing. The company, based in New York, lost possession of the laptop July 26 at San Francisco International Airport. The laptop contained unencrypted pre-enrollment records of individuals interested in joining the program, the Transportation Security Administration said Monday in a statement.
NEWS
January 18, 2014 | By Chris Erskine
With the Transportation Security Administration, there is almost always a method to the madness. For instance, fliers who found themselves standing out on the runway after the LAX shooting last November should have been relieved that they were out of harm's way, TSA spokesman Nico Melendez said Saturday at the Los Angeles Times Travel Show. "That's a good thing," the 12-year-TSA veteran said, noting authorities had no way of knowing whether the attacker was trying to herd passengers into an ambush at more vulnerable drop-off points.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2014 | By Hugo Martin, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
The U.S. Department of Transportation is investigating whether to fine several airlines that left passengers stranded on flights for more than three hours after a shooting at Los Angeles International Airport. The Nov. 1 shooting, which killed a Transportation Security Administration officer and wounded three other people, delayed 15 L.A.-bound flights, according to a report by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Eleven of those flights were domestic routes that were delayed on airport tarmacs for at least three hours.
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