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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 2001 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For all the guff Southern Californians take about smog and congestion, here's some information to lob back at those smug San Franciscans--average commute times are lower in Los Angeles than in the city by the bay. And Anaheim in Orange County leads not just the state but the nation in that supposedly antithetical Southern California act--carpooling. Those are among the latest findings from the U.S. Census Bureau, which today released a comparison of commuting patterns in U.S.
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SPORTS
July 29, 2010 | Eric Sondheimer
Just days after the Los Angeles Unified School District authorized sports teams to collect a $24 voluntary contribution from students to help pay for a $650,000 cut in transportation funding, Supt. Ramon C. Cortines announced Thursday that he had rescinded the request. Cortines said in a statement, "Although this district is in a financial crisis, I am asking for other financial options to cover the $650,000 needed for the district's athletics transportation budget." District spokesman Robert Alaniz said Cortines had been unaware of the request for $24 and was concerned that those who could not afford to contribute would be singled out. "He didn't want that stigma attached to kids," Alaniz said.
NEWS
December 23, 2001 | JERRY HARKAVY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Getting Amtrak service between Portland and Boston took longer than construction of the transcontinental railroad and cost more than $50 million in public spending on new track and equipment. For many, seeing the trains roll will be the fulfillment of a dream. Still, how many riders will climb aboard is anyone's guess. The Northern New England Passenger Rail Authority estimates that 320,000 passengers will ride the Downeaster in the first year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2011 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles City Controller Wendy Greuel issued a subpoena Wednesday, demanding documents related to the workings of a Gold Card parking ticket review service, saying the transportation department had stalled in providing full access to records. FOR THE RECORD: Gold Cards: An earlier version of the headline on this article indicated that the mayor had used the Gold Card service. The mayor's office, not the mayor himself, has acknowledged using the service to help constituents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1998 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city's beleaguered campaign to expand Los Angeles International Airport hit another snag this week when the officials who had requested bids to oversee the project's next phase abruptly and indefinitely postponed the process on the advice of city lawyers .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | RICH SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Want to check out up-to-the-minute road conditions--just like the radio traffic reporters do? Pose a question to Caltrans? Find out about local speed traps? Cruise the infobahn. You can call up a traffic map--similar to the kind that can be found in Caltrans' traffic control center--showing which freeways have SigAlerts (in red, of course) and which freeways are free-flowing (in green). You can find the answers to such questions as: "Can a local cop cite you for speeding on a freeway?"
WORLD
January 22, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim, Los Angeles Times
Iran's Foreign Ministry has barred the mayor of Tehran, a rival of conservative President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, from traveling to the United States to be honored for improving the capital's public transportation system, a local newspaper reported Saturday. Mohammed Baqer Qalibaf has been denied permission to attend a conference Monday of the Institute for Transport and Development Policy, reported the newspaper Tehran Emrouz, which is close to the mayor. Tehran, along with the Chinese city of Guangzhou, the Spanish city of Leon, the Peruvian capital of Lima, and the French city of Nantes, are finalists for the 2011 Sustainable Transport Award bestowed by the international transport institute.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - It's becoming a familiar scene in everybody's favorite city - luxury shuttles with Wi-Fi and plush seats barreling past sluggish, dilapidated city buses crammed with local residents standing elbow to elbow. The nerd convoy, ferrying workers to technology companies in Silicon Valley, has raised the ire of civic activists who see it as a symbol of a divide between the haves and have nots as the region's tech boom has sent housing costs and evictions soaring. But as heated as that backlash has become at times, it has obscured a much broader story that these buses have to tell about changes sweeping across not just San Francisco but also the entire Bay Area.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
When the ferryboat Sierra Queen was launched on this 7,327-foot-high lake in time for this Fourth of July holiday, weekend hikers in the High Sierra knew summer had finally arrived. The Sierra Queen is one of the most remote ferries in the nation and caters almost exclusively to backpackers hiking the Mexico-to-Canada Pacific Crest Trail and the John Muir Trail.
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