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Trapped

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Kelly Parker
An hours-long search for a puppy trapped in a drainage pipe at a Newport Coast home ended sadly Thursday night, authorities said. The 7-week-old male puppy named Hunter was reported trapped at about 6:53 p.m., according to a news release from the Newport Beach Fire Department. "Unfortunately, based off of our experience there yesterday ... we don't think the dog survived," Fire Capt. Mike Liberto said Friday. A fire engine and the department's Urban Search and Rescue Team responded to the scene, where crews used specialized equipment like confined-space optical cameras to search for the missing canine, Liberto said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2013 | By Kelly Parker
A three-hour search for a puppy trapped in a drainage pipe at a Newport Coast home ended in vain Thursday night, authorities said. The 11-week-old male puppy named Hunter was reported trapped at 20 Vincennes at 6:53 p.m., according to a news release from the Newport Beach Fire Department. The dog found his way into a six-inch pipe left uncovered during work being done on the home's piping system, the Daily Pilot reported. "Unfortunately, based off of our experience there yesterday ... we don't think the dog survived," Fire Capt.
SCIENCE
May 24, 2013 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
In the war against pests, the lowly cockroach makes for a fearsome adversary. It can go weeks without water, survive decapitation for a time - and, like any proper super-villain, can send humans screaming from a room. Now researchers have discovered how some roaches have eluded humans' once-infallible traps: They have evolved so that glucose-sweetened bait tastes bitter. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, solves a 20-year mystery and sheds light on the cockroach's powerful ability to adapt.
NATIONAL
May 20, 2013 | By Julie Cart and Hector Becerra
Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin spoke directly to citizens in her devastated state Monday night, saying, 'We are looking under every single piece of debris” for the missing after a massive tornado ripped apart the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore. “Our hearts are broken for the parents that are wondering about the state of their children that had been in the schools that have been hit today,” Fallin said.  “I know that there are families wondering where their loved ones are.” PHOTOS: Tornadoes hit Oklahoma The tornado, which touched down Monday afternoon, killed at least 51 people, many of them children, according to the state medical examiner's office, which warned that the number is likely to rise through the night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
This post has been corrected. See below for details. A young mountain lion stuck in a downtown Santa Cruz aqueduct was tranquilized by wildlife officials Thursday afternoon. Officials spent several hours attempting to lure the lion back through the aqueduct and to its habitat, the Santa Cruz Sentinel reported . The animal unsuccessfully tried to jump the 15- to 20-foot concrete walls to escape. Rescuers subdued the untagged adolescent with two tranquilizer darts. They planned to blindfold and evaluate the animal before relocating it. The lion was first spotted early in the morning, and authorities received several more calls about the lion wandering down a street, the Associated Press reported.
OPINION
May 13, 2013 | JIM NEWTON
There are good reasons for most of the city's campaign finance laws. Individual contribution limits are intended to keep a single donor from purchasing the support of a candidate. Public financing is intended to level the playing field between incumbents and challengers. Limits on gifts help deter graft. But Los Angeles has one regulation that doesn't show up in many other places, and it doesn't make much sense: Candidates who raise money for an election cannot carry that money over if they fail to win in the first round and face a runoff for the same office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 2013 | By Rosanna Xia
Two Los Angeles firefighters were burned fighting a three-story house fire in Sherman Oaks early Saturday, authorities said. The fire was reported at 12:02 a.m. Saturday in the 4000 block of Sumac Drive, a winding hilly road off Beverly Glen Boulevard, authorities said. The house, which was unoccupied, has two stories below ground level and all three floors quickly became unstable. Firefighters were ordered out of the structure and forced to fight the flames from the outside, according to authorities.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo, Los Angeles Times
Payday loans often trap consumers in a cycle of debt, a new report by the federal government finds. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau found that the average consumer took out 11 loans during a 12-month period, paying a total of $574 in fees - not including loan principal. A quarter of borrowers paid $781 or more in fees. "There is high sustained use - which we consider to be not only when a consumer rolls over the loan, but also when he pays it off and returns very quickly to take out another one," Richard Cordray, director of the bureau, said in a conference call with reporters Tuesday.
TRAVEL
April 21, 2013 | By Julia Flynn Siler
HONOLULU - He's known as the Woody Guthrie of Hawaiian music, a virtuoso ukulele player who's helped to introduce new generations to music that might otherwise be lost. But on the autumn morning I met up with Eddie Kamae, few people seemed to recognize the octogenarian wearing Levis and a blue work shirt. It was just after 9 a.m., and Eddie was eating a bowl of vanilla ice cream at the Wailana Coffee House in Waikiki. He had risen before sunrise to pray, read the paper and watch the sky lighten from the nearby apartment building where he and his wife, Myrna, have lived for nearly half a century.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
For a big swath of last year's Coachella, I followed around the young Kentucky rock band Sleeper Agent as they made their festival debut. They weren't an especially hyped or sonically au courant act, just a charismatic, road-dogging power-pop group on a slow ride up from the hometown dive circuit into national tours. They had a midday slot, a few powerful backers (like their manager, the son of music mogul Irving Azoff), and they seemed like a perfect band to trail to find out what it feels like to dip a toe into the warm pool of Coachella fame.
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