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Traumatic Encephalopathy

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NEWS
September 20, 2010
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy didn't receive much media buzz until University of Pennsylvania football player Owen Thomas committed suicide before a game seemingly out of the blue in April. Boston University researchers this month confirmed that an autopsy of the 21-year-old's brain showed early signs of the disease typically found in NFL athletes with a history of repetitive head trauma. Researchers were quick to underscore that it's impossible to definitively say that CTE, as it's called, caused the suicide, but the findings offered some explanation for the unusual behavior Thomas began to display before he hanged himself.
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SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Rosie Mestel
Junior Seau, among the greatest linebackers in NFL history, suffered from degenerative brain disease when he fatally shot himself in May, the National Institutes of Health said in a study released Thursday, another blow to a league whose former players say they were never warned about the dangers of head injuries. More than 2,000 former players are suing the NFL, contending the league never properly addressed the problems with head injuries and in many cases withheld information about the long-term effects associated with them.
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NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Retired football players who are overweight could be at greater risk for cognitive problems compared to normal-weight former players, a study finds. Football players might have the health deck stacked against them in other ways, since they're also at risk for brain injury from concussions. Add obesity into the mix and it may up the ante even more. Other studies have shown a link between obesity and cognitive impairment. Researchers analyzed data in two groups: 38 retired NFL players who were at a healthy weight and 38 retired players who were overweight.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As the National Football League kicks off a new season, a study appearing in a leading medical journal underscores the long-term costs of the game on those who play it. A study tracking 3,439 retired players with five or more seasons in the NFL found these athletes four times as likely as other men their age to die of Alzheimer's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Among the league's "speed players" - those who build up substantial speed before they make a tackle or are brought down by one - the odds of dying of those causes were even greater.
SCIENCE
September 5, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
As the National Football League kicks off a new season, a study appearing in a leading medical journal underscores the long-term costs of the game on those who play it. A study tracking 3,439 retired players with five or more seasons in the NFL found these athletes four times as likely as other men their age to die of Alzheimer's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Among the league's "speed players" - those who build up substantial speed before they make a tackle or are brought down by one - the odds of dying of those causes were even greater.
SPORTS
March 3, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Bob Probert might have been the most feared NHL player who ever raised a fist, a wild brawler who often skated off bloodied and battered but to enthusiastic applause. He spent 16 seasons as an enforcer for the Chicago Blackhawks and Detroit Red Wings, avenging slights against teammates and energizing his team. Decades of fighting on the ice and hard living away from it took a heavy toll though: He died of a heart attack last summer at 45. Probert's contribution as a player was measured in penalty minutes, not in goals.
SPORTS
May 2, 2011 | By David Wharton
In the months leading up to his suicide, former NFL player Dave Duerson feared that a life spent on football fields, all of those hard hits, might have irreparably damaged his brain. Now, medical researchers say they have confirmation. A postmortem examination has found evidence that Duerson suffered from a neurodegenerative disease linked to concussions and other repetitive head trauma, researchers said Monday. "The pathology was severe in areas of the brain that influence impulse control, inhibition, emotion and memory," said Dr. Ann McKee, a neurologist at Boston University and the Bedford VA Medical Center.
SPORTS
February 21, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
As we ponder floating bonds and working construction cranes in our quest to bring the NFL to Los Angeles, we might also ponder the story of Dave Duerson. He is the former Chicago Bears safety, most notably with the 1985 Super Bowl champs, and a businessman who grew a food company into a multimillion-dollar success. He had 11 years in the NFL and was selected to four Pro Bowls. In other words, Duerson was more than just another guy. Thursday, Duerson shot himself to death in his home in Florida.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Melissa Healy / Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kevin Guskiewicz, one of the winners of the MacArthur Foundation award announced Tuesday, was long a thorn in the side of the National Football League. Since 1999, he has wired the helmets of about 700 college football players with accelerometers to study what kinds of hits result in concussions , which kinds of players get them, and what the long-term consequences of those brain injuries can be. He was among the first to find a strong link between multiple concussions and later dementia, depression and memory and intellectual deficits that often lead to Alzheimer's disease.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The brain of former National Hockey League player Derek Boogaard showed signs of early chronic traumatic encephalopathy, researchers report, shedding light on the neurological condition that may affect some athletes who sustain brain injuries during play. Boogaard died at age 28 from a drug overdose in May, and his brain was autopsied by Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist at the Bedford VA Medical Center and co-director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University.
NEWS
January 17, 2012 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Retired football players who are overweight could be at greater risk for cognitive problems compared to normal-weight former players, a study finds. Football players might have the health deck stacked against them in other ways, since they're also at risk for brain injury from concussions. Add obesity into the mix and it may up the ante even more. Other studies have shown a link between obesity and cognitive impairment. Researchers analyzed data in two groups: 38 retired NFL players who were at a healthy weight and 38 retired players who were overweight.
NEWS
December 6, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The brain of former National Hockey League player Derek Boogaard showed signs of early chronic traumatic encephalopathy, researchers report, shedding light on the neurological condition that may affect some athletes who sustain brain injuries during play. Boogaard died at age 28 from a drug overdose in May, and his brain was autopsied by Dr. Ann McKee, a neuropathologist at the Bedford VA Medical Center and co-director of the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at Boston University.
SPORTS
October 5, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Flashy Rick Martin was never going to be confused with an enforcer, achieving acclaim as a vaunted goal-scorer, not a fighter, in his glory days with the Buffalo Sabres. But Martin, who died in March of a heart attack at age 59, was revealed to have had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease linked to repeated brain trauma, according to Boston University researchers in a report issued Wednesday. The other two former NHL players diagnosed with CTE, post-mortem, were known for their formidable fighting abilities, Bob Probert and Reggie Fleming . Martin was said to have stage two of the disease — stage four being the most severe.
NEWS
September 20, 2011 | By Melissa Healy / Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Kevin Guskiewicz, one of the winners of the MacArthur Foundation award announced Tuesday, was long a thorn in the side of the National Football League. Since 1999, he has wired the helmets of about 700 college football players with accelerometers to study what kinds of hits result in concussions , which kinds of players get them, and what the long-term consequences of those brain injuries can be. He was among the first to find a strong link between multiple concussions and later dementia, depression and memory and intellectual deficits that often lead to Alzheimer's disease.
SPORTS
May 2, 2011 | By David Wharton
In the months leading up to his suicide, former NFL player Dave Duerson feared that a life spent on football fields, all of those hard hits, might have irreparably damaged his brain. Now, medical researchers say they have confirmation. A postmortem examination has found evidence that Duerson suffered from a neurodegenerative disease linked to concussions and other repetitive head trauma, researchers said Monday. "The pathology was severe in areas of the brain that influence impulse control, inhibition, emotion and memory," said Dr. Ann McKee, a neurologist at Boston University and the Bedford VA Medical Center.
SPORTS
March 3, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Bob Probert might have been the most feared NHL player who ever raised a fist, a wild brawler who often skated off bloodied and battered but to enthusiastic applause. He spent 16 seasons as an enforcer for the Chicago Blackhawks and Detroit Red Wings, avenging slights against teammates and energizing his team. Decades of fighting on the ice and hard living away from it took a heavy toll though: He died of a heart attack last summer at 45. Probert's contribution as a player was measured in penalty minutes, not in goals.
SPORTS
October 5, 2011 | Staff and wire reports
Flashy Rick Martin was never going to be confused with an enforcer, achieving acclaim as a vaunted goal-scorer, not a fighter, in his glory days with the Buffalo Sabres. But Martin, who died in March of a heart attack at age 59, was revealed to have had chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease linked to repeated brain trauma, according to Boston University researchers in a report issued Wednesday. The other two former NHL players diagnosed with CTE, post-mortem, were known for their formidable fighting abilities, Bob Probert and Reggie Fleming . Martin was said to have stage two of the disease — stage four being the most severe.
SPORTS
January 10, 2013 | By Sam Farmer and Rosie Mestel
Junior Seau, among the greatest linebackers in NFL history, suffered from degenerative brain disease when he fatally shot himself in May, the National Institutes of Health said in a study released Thursday, another blow to a league whose former players say they were never warned about the dangers of head injuries. More than 2,000 former players are suing the NFL, contending the league never properly addressed the problems with head injuries and in many cases withheld information about the long-term effects associated with them.
SPORTS
February 21, 2011 | Bill Dwyre
As we ponder floating bonds and working construction cranes in our quest to bring the NFL to Los Angeles, we might also ponder the story of Dave Duerson. He is the former Chicago Bears safety, most notably with the 1985 Super Bowl champs, and a businessman who grew a food company into a multimillion-dollar success. He had 11 years in the NFL and was selected to four Pro Bowls. In other words, Duerson was more than just another guy. Thursday, Duerson shot himself to death in his home in Florida.
NEWS
September 20, 2010
Chronic traumatic encephalopathy didn't receive much media buzz until University of Pennsylvania football player Owen Thomas committed suicide before a game seemingly out of the blue in April. Boston University researchers this month confirmed that an autopsy of the 21-year-old's brain showed early signs of the disease typically found in NFL athletes with a history of repetitive head trauma. Researchers were quick to underscore that it's impossible to definitively say that CTE, as it's called, caused the suicide, but the findings offered some explanation for the unusual behavior Thomas began to display before he hanged himself.
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