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Travel Insurance

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TRAVEL
May 22, 2010 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times
If you're planning an expensive trip, travel insurance might spare you some sleepless nights. Just make sure you know what you're buying. Some tips: --Expect to pay 4% to 8% of your trip cost for premiums on standard "bundled" policies. These cover trip delays, cancellations and interruptions due to illness, weather and other unexpected events. -- Compare different policies on websites such as InsureMyTrip.com, QuoteWright.com and Squaremouth.com. --Read the entire certificate of insurance, not just the summary.
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TRAVEL
February 2, 2014
THE BEST WAY TO LONDON For information on Patricia Voyages , go to http://www.trinityhouse.co.uk . Strand Voyages, http://www.strandtravelltd.co.uk , is the booking agent. Cabins come in three grades; the top will cost about $5,750 for two. The least expensive will be about $5,100. MasterCard or Visa are accepted for booking, but a 2% fee is assessed. A wire transfer is less expensive, but there are fees for that as well. Travel insurance is required. In 2014, sailings will be available every Wednesday from April 23 through Oct. 8, except June 18 and 25. From LAX, From LAX, British, American, Air New Zealand, Virgin Atlantic and United offer nonstop service to London, and American, United, KLM, Delta and US Airways offer connecting service (change of planes)
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NEWS
March 16, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
With some of Japan’s nuclear reactors emitting radiation after damage from last week's devastating earthquake and tsunami, travelers may wonder: Will their travel insurance policy cover them if they cancel trips because of radiation contamination in the region? Insurers are already grappling with this question, with different outcomes. But several I contacted this week agreed on one point: Unless you had added a so-called cancel-for-any-reason rider to your policy, you won’t be reimbursed for your trip deposits and other costs if you cancel your Japan trip solely because you worry that you might encounter radiation—or any other problem, for that matter.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
What's the big idea? For some high school students this summer, it might be examining how Copenhagen redefines urban life or how India delivers low-cost healthcare to a booming population. Atlas Workshops in Cambridge, Mass., takes kids overseas to experience how other countries approach social, cultural and political change. "Our programs are structured to develop real-world skills, promote intercultural confidence, inspire big ideas and open the doors to new cultures and communities," program director Jenny Bordo said in a statement.  The company started in 2012 by designing trips that go beyond traditional tourism.
TRAVEL
October 13, 2013
Thank you for Catharine Hamm's enlightening article on travel insurance ["What That Policy Covers," On the Spot, Oct. 6]. I blew out my knee's quad tendon in Dubai on the first day of a cruise tour. After having my entire leg cast locally, I tried to fly back to L.A. for immediate surgery. I had a prepaid return flight in coach, but Emirates Airlines said it couldn't accommodate me there because my leg had to be elevated and sticking straight out, and coach didn't have the room for my leg. (Of course, I'd have accepted lying across three seats, but the airline said no.)
BUSINESS
December 1, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
After a nasty storm ripped through the East Coast on the busiest travel day of the year, you might think that buying travel insurance for holiday travel would be a no-brainer. Not so much. The 114-year-old National Consumers League concluded recently that travel insurance is usually a bad deal because most policies are riddled with exceptions that allow insurance companies to reject claims for payoffs. Most insurance companies won't disclose their track record for paying out claims, making it nearly impossible to judge whether insurance is worth the money, the league says.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2012 | By Scott J. Wilson, Los Angeles Times
If you're spending a lot of money on a trip, consider buying travel insurance to protect yourself against the unexpected. Key things to know: • Typically, travel insurance reimburses you for such things as nonrefundable cruise deposits or airfares - and for the cost of rescheduling flights - when weather, illness, natural disaster or terrorism cause your trip to be canceled or delayed. Plans differ slightly from one another, so be sure to read the fine print. • Some policies cover medical expenses incurred outside the United States, and may pay for emergency evacuation in case of a serious injury or health problem.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
And you thought travel insurance was necessary only for overseas trips? Hurricane Sandy serves as a reminder that domestic travel plans can go wrong as well. The relatively low cost of most plans can make travel insurance an appealing option in this era of nonrefundable air and lodging fees. For example, covering a $1,000 trip to the Big Apple would cost as little as $15. Those with plans for a Caribbean cruise in particular might consider travel insurance during this busy hurricane season.
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | By Jane Engle, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Want to cancel your vacation abroad because the U.S. State Department issued a worldwide travel alert after U.S. forces killed terrorist leader Osama bin Laden ?  Go ahead, but don’t expect to get your money back through travel insurance -- unless you bought a very special policy. That's because most travel or trip insurance is designed to cover events, not states of mind, insurers say. So if a terrorist attack occurs in a city that you plan to visit on your insured trip -- or while you’re there — you can probably cancel or interrupt your journey and get your nonrefundable deposits back.
TRAVEL
April 16, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
On a trip to a familiar domestic destination, you probably don't need travel insurance. But it may be worth considering if you're buying a cruise or tour package with hefty prepayments and heavy penalties for late cancellations. Trip cancellation/interruption insurance typically covers your losses if a family medical crisis or certain other emergencies force you to cancel, postpone or abbreviate a trip. Emergency medical policies cover emergency transport or medical care or both.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
After a nasty storm ripped through the East Coast on the busiest travel day of the year, you might think that buying travel insurance for holiday travel would be a no-brainer. Not so much. The 114-year-old National Consumers League concluded recently that travel insurance is usually a bad deal because most policies are riddled with exceptions that allow insurance companies to reject claims for payoffs. Most insurance companies won't disclose their track record for paying out claims, making it nearly impossible to judge whether insurance is worth the money, the league says.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2013
I would like to endorse the call for a congressional hearing to change the way travel insurance is marketed ["What That Policy Covers," by Catharine Hamm, Oct. 6]. We foolishly bought travel insurance for a trip to Ireland in May. The insurance was marketed to cover discontinuance of the trip because of illness. A week before our departure, I developed severe shoulder pain and visited the ER. Tests revealed nothing, nor did my family doctor find anything a few days later. We left for Ireland and joined our tour group, but the pain returned, this time in my neck and more intense.
TRAVEL
October 20, 2013
Timing is everything In regard to connection times ("Failing to Make the Connection," by Catharine Hamm, On the Spot, Oct. 13), we recently took a round trip on British Airways from LAX to Copenhagen. We chose a connection time of four hours each way just to be safe; the recommended time is two hours. British Airways means you go to Terminal 5 at Heathrow. Coming in, we barely made our connection to Copenhagen because everyone gets re-screened and the line was enormous. Coming home, we left Copenhagen before noon and easily made the re-screening time and had a leisurely lunch before boarding the flight home.
TRAVEL
October 6, 2013
You're getting down to booking your airline ticket. Because you checked ahead of time - you did, didn't you? - you know how much you will have to pay if you make a change to your nonrefundable ticket. Then you see a glimmer of hope. The airline or the online travel agency is offering you a chance to buy insurance. Maybe that's a hedge against having to pay a change fee that could cost you $200. Is this the answer to your prayers? Depends on what you're praying for. Let's say your petition sounds like this: "Please, (name higher power here)
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Rochelle had a really bad trip aboard a cruise ship, so what she should be asking about is travel insurance. But her question concerns customer service. Specifically, why is it sometimes so bad? Rochelle broke her back while on a cruise. Needless to say, the trip was ruined. Now that she's better, she'd like to give cruising another try. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Rochelle contacted the cruise line. She said she knew her accident wasn't the company's fault.
BUSINESS
May 27, 2013 | David Lazarus
Glenn Egelko used Ticketmaster to buy tickets to a matchup this month at the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena between the United States and Iranian wrestling teams. This was real wrestling - the kind that used to be part of the Olympics until Olympic officials killed the event. It wasn't the kind in which over-muscled men leap from the tops of the ropes or bash each other with folding chairs. In any case, it was during the purchase process on Ticketmaster's website that Egelko, 63, of Ventura, encountered something unexpected.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2013 | David Lazarus
Barbara Butkus bought an airline ticket in November to fly from Palm Springs to Washington, D.C., a month later for a family reunion. Just to be on the safe side, Butkus, 80, also bought travel insurance while booking her flight through Orbitz, the online travel agency. The coverage was from Allianz, a leading provider of travel insurance. As it happened, Butkus had to cancel her trip for health reasons. She began experiencing shortness of breath in early December, and her doctor advised her not to travel.
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