Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsTravelogue
IN THE NEWS

Travelogue

FEATURED ARTICLES
HOME & GARDEN
December 13, 2007 | David A. Keeps
Over the last decade, ceramic designer Hannah Morrow has lived in London, New York and Los Angeles, chronicling her experiences in the H for Hannah Stickers Collection. The pieces, decorated with graphics and alphabet letters spelling out the names of the three cities, are made from bone china fired in Stoke-on-Trent, England. Her L.A. pieces feature illustrations of sunset-lighted palm trees, surfboards, Spanish missions and Mann Chinese Theatre.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
If you are of a certain age, you will remember the 1950s golden age of Cinerama, the bigger-than-big-screen process so enormous it took a trio of curved panels to contain its expansiveness. Now, the adventurous folks at Flicker Alley are allowing you to experience that process with a pair of DVD releases, both travelogues, that use Smilebox's simulated curved screen to make us feel as if we are in one of those huge auditoriums. "Cinerama Holiday," the first film released in that process, follows a Swiss couple as they tour the U.S. and an American couple as they visit Switzerland and Paris.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
American author Bill Barich, a resident of Ireland these past nine years, was rummaging through a local secondhand shop in the summer of 2008 when he stumbled across a "beat up old copy" of "Travels With Charley," John Steinbeck's late-in-life attempt in 1960 to reacquaint himself with his native country. The book is a sour look at the American people as Steinbeck, in failing health, succumbed to pessimism over the caliber of his fellow citizens and their embrace of a culture built on the plastic and the contrived.
TRAVEL
October 27, 2013 | By Jen Leo
You'd be surprised at how traveling at a slower pace can transform a road trip. Name: Bikeovernights.org What it does: It's a tip and inspiration blog for bicyclists looking for quick or affordable do-it-yourself cycling getaways in the U.S. and Britain. What's hot: Real people sharing real cycling stories - with photos, favorite local bike shops, tips and more. It can be used as a primer for cyclists training for a cross-country adventure or as a resource for veteran cyclists looking for scenic rides they haven't tried.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2011
SERIES Doctor Who: BBC America kicks off a marathon of episodes from the long-running sci-fi drama's latest season, interspersed with a series of new making-of specials (5 p.m.). Fringe: Olivia (Anna Torv) has William Bell's soul trapped inside her in this repeat of the trippy drama (9 p.m. Fox). Paranormal Challenge: The abandoned and purportedly haunted Linda Vista Hospital in Boyle Heights is the next stop for this spooky series (11 p.m. Travel). Heat Seekers: Spicy doughnuts and jalapeno mac 'n' cheese are on the menu when this food-themed travelogue visits Charleston, S.C. (10 p.m. Food)
NEWS
April 21, 1985
"A.D." set a new low for television pseudo-dramas. It was ridiculous and a waste of good acting talent. There was no story. It ended abruptly with nothing resolved. Most of the movie seemed to be a travelogue set in the Middle East. Henry Duval, Arcadia
TRAVEL
August 30, 1987
What a perfectly beautiful descriptive travelogue of Ohio's Plain People country that Betty Hughes brought us Aug. 9. My travel to the fall foliage of the Eastern states last year included the Amish country of Lancaster County, Pa., which I can single out as the highlight of the tour. Thanks to Hughes for taking me back vicariously to the ever interesting Amish country and its peoples, and educating us that there are more such settlements as in Ohio, which she so superbly described.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
The opening program of "Music in Time," a 16-part weekly series hosted by James Galway devoted to a history of classical music (KCET Channel 28, Sunday at 6 p.m.), pretends to be a sneak peek at what lies ahead. In reality, it is a hopeless hodgepodge of stiff performance snippets that will leave the viewer bothered and bewildered. On screen, Galway is charming--though the stuffy off-screen narrator isn't.
TRAVEL
December 2, 2001
Having just returned from a weekend trip to Acadiana for the Basile Swine Festival and a traditional boucherie hosted by friends, I read with interest "Cajun Country Ramble" (Nov. 11) by Judith Fein. The beauty and riches of Acadiana are great and vast, and no one could be expected to experience them all in one trip or mention them all in a single travelogue. I was nonetheless disappointed to see no mention of the Savoy Music Center (or anything else) in Eunice, where some of the most traditional Cajun music can be experienced from 9 a.m. to noon every Saturday in one of the most traditional settings.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1996
Tom Shales rightly bemoaned the blatant exploitation of Elizabeth Taylor's Black Pearls fragrance on CBS' Monday night sitcoms ("CBS Follows the Scent of Missing Pearls," Feb. 28). The timing couldn't be more disturbing, for the next night "Roseanne" on ABC did a relentlessly unfunny 30-minute travelogue on Walt Disney World. The entire Conner clan mingled with Mickey and Goofy like a lobotomized Snow White and the Dozen Dweebs, pitching everything from the great food to the exciting rides to the classy hotel accommodations.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
"He who makes a beast of himself," Samuel Johnson famously observed, "gets rid of the pain of being a man. " His subject is, of course, inebriation and the way that, in the derangement of the senses, we might escape, however briefly, what Lawrence Osborne calls "a loneliness that otherwise cannot be so easily dislodged. " And yet, if Osborne's delightfully idiosyncratic "The Wet and the Dry: A Drinker's Journey" has anything to tell us, it's that there is more to drinking than derangement, that it may lead to a transcendence more profound.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2012
SERIES 2 Broke Girls: Max and Caroline (Kat Dennings, Beth Behrs) decide to supplement their incomes with drugs in this new episode when they sign up to be test subjects in a clinical drug trial to earn money (8:30 p.m. CBS). Hart of Dixie: Gary Cole guest stars as Zoe's (Rachel Bilson) father, who comes to Bluebell at his daughter's request to operate on George's (Scott Porter) father (Eric Pierpoint) in this new episode (9 p.m. KTLA). Being Human: The series about a vampire, a werewolf and ghost ends its season (9 p.m. Syfy)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 2012 | By Richard Rayner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Man Within My Head Pico Iyer Alfred A. Knopf: 256 pp., $25.95 Writers don't always get the critics and biographers they deserve, but since his death in 1991 Graham Greene has been on the whole pretty lucky. Norman Sherry completed his three-volume biography, a magnificent monument. National Book Award winner Shirley Hazzard wrote a sharply exquisite memoir of how she and her husband, the biographer Francis Steegmuller, got to know Greene on the isle of Capri, where Greene lived some months of each year during the 1950s and 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2010 | By Scott Martelle, Special to the Los Angeles Times
American author Bill Barich, a resident of Ireland these past nine years, was rummaging through a local secondhand shop in the summer of 2008 when he stumbled across a "beat up old copy" of "Travels With Charley," John Steinbeck's late-in-life attempt in 1960 to reacquaint himself with his native country. The book is a sour look at the American people as Steinbeck, in failing health, succumbed to pessimism over the caliber of his fellow citizens and their embrace of a culture built on the plastic and the contrived.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2010 | By Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
Executives at TLC, the cable channel airing "Sarah Palin's Alaska," insist the docu-travelogue starring the former GOP vice presidential nominee and possible future presidential candidate has no political agenda. Yet if Palin were looking to create a compelling campaign biopic, she could do worse than the lushly produced, eight-part series premiering Sunday. The program casts her as a chipper frontierswoman who juggles motherhood with adventures in Alaska's vast wilderness. One moment Palin is baking cupcakes; the next, she's perched in a boat watching two growling brown bears wrestle.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1987 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Robert Rauschenberg is a famous artist. Hence, much of what he does is rendered slightly out of focus by the success of past achievements and the glamour associated with his name. One thing that's clear, however, is the intelligence and innovation that's informed much of his best work. His "combine" paintings, some of which currently fill a small room at the Temporary Contemporary, introduced a new vernacular vocabulary of scavenged materials in the '50s.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|