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Treasury Bonds

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BUSINESS
August 11, 2010 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Concerned about a slowing of the economic recovery, the Federal Reserve decided Tuesday to resume buying U.S. Treasury bonds in an effort to hold down longer-term interest rates. The net effect will be to keep the Fed's mammoth portfolio of about $2 trillion in U.S. Treasury bonds and mortgage-related securities constant, rather than allow the holdings to shrink as securities are paid off. The Fed bought the bulk of those bonds in 2009 via a program that has helped push mortgage rates to record lows.
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BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel and Walter Hamilton
NEW YORK - The prospect of a U.S. debt default has unnerved investors, corporate executives and foreign leaders. What's so troubling about Congress failing to raise the nation's debt ceiling by Thursday? Here are basic facts about the debt ceiling and the potential consequences of a default. What is the debt ceiling? The debt ceiling is a borrowing limit, similar to the spending cap on a credit card. It places a lid on how much the United States can borrow by selling Treasury bonds.
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BUSINESS
June 3, 1987 | Associated Press
Paul Volcker's retirement as chairman of the Federal Reserve triggered immediate inflation Tuesday fears on many of the nation's futures markets. Treasury bonds put on the most dramatic performance, plunging more than 2 points on the Chicago Board of Trade, but sharp moves also were recorded in precious metals, the dollar index, foreign currencies and agricultural futures.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Five years after the U.S. financial crisis helped cause a deep global recession, foreign leaders are worried that history is going to repeat itself. The fiscal impasse that has partially shut the federal government now threatens to trigger a U.S. default that would roil financial markets worldwide, leading an agitated China to suggest replacing the dollar as the international reserve currency. "As U.S. politicians of both political parties are still shuffling back and forth between the White House and the Capitol Hill without striking a viable deal to bring normality to the body politic they brag about, it is perhaps a good time for the befuddled world to start considering building a de-Americanized world," China's official state-run news agency, Xinhua, said in an English-language commentary Sunday.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. Treasury yields surged Thursday after reports of sharply lower claims for jobless benefits and stronger factory output in the East raised more concerns about inflation and about the Federal Reserve's credit-tightening plans. The dollar rose the most in almost four months against the euro and gained versus the yen after a report showed the U.S. current-account deficit grew less than forecast in the third quarter. The current account is the broadest measure of the nation's trade balance.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | Reuters
Blue chip stocks closed modestly higher Friday, supported by a rally in Treasury bonds. The Dow Jones industrial average ended up 6.04 points to 3,369.41 based on early and unofficial data. In the broad market, advances and declines were about evenly matched on New York Stock Exchange volume of 169 million shares.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
The ink isn’t even dry yet on the midterm election results when one of the key issues, how to stimulate the economy, returned on Monday to the political arena. In remarks prepared for delivery at a trade association convention in Phoenix, Sarah Palin  warns against  the recently announced Federal Reserve policy to buy $600 billion in Treasury bonds. Excerpts of her speech were leaked to National Review Online. “The Fed hopes doing this may buy us a little temporary economic growth by supplying banks with extra cash which they could then lend out to businesses,” Palin will argue.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2001 | WILLIAM PESEK Jr., BLOOMBERG NEWS
Is the Treasury bond market's rally over? The Federal Reserve's surprise rate cut Wednesday was followed by a sharp jump in longer-term T-bond yields--suggesting that those yields may already have priced in a significant number of cuts by the Fed in its key short-term rate. The price of the 10-year Treasury note experienced its biggest one-day decline since July 1996, a sell-off that boosted the yield on the note to 5.16% from 4.92% Tuesday. The yield on the five-year T-note rose to 4.
BUSINESS
November 30, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Wall Street broke free of the doldrums Tuesday, rallying on strength in the dollar and Treasury bonds. The Dow Jones industrial index ended at 2,101.53, up 20.09. The advance was the largest since Oct. 20, when the index rose 43.92 to 2,181.19. Advancing issues outnumbered decliners 12-to-7 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed stocks. Big Board volume was 127.42 million shares, up from 123.48 million Monday. Early activity was erratic.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Treasury bond prices rallied Thursday after a strong auction for 30-year bonds, one of the best showings in four years. The auction's success was attributed to an attractive rate and the latest Federal Reserve moves to boost the faltering economy. The auction was powered by near-record demand from individual investors for the 30-year issue, which offered an average yield of 8%. Thursday's action was in stark contrast to the first two parts of this week's note and bond auction.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2013 | By Alejandro Lazo
Fixed mortgage rates this week resumed their recent upward trend, with lenders offering 30-year home loans to solid borrowers at an average of 4.51%, according to Freddie Mac. The average rate, up from 4.29% last week and 3.56% a year ago, is more than a percentage point above last fall's record low of 3.31%. Rising rates could send more prospective buyers into the housing market in the short term while also making it harder to afford a home. Rising rates also are likely to cut into mortgage refinancing activity.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Mortgage rates have risen for the third week in a row, with Freddie Mac's survey of lenders pegging the average 30-year fixed-rate home loan at 3.59%, up from 3.51% last week. Fixed-rate 15-year mortgages -- popular during a recent boom in homeowners refinancing their mortgages -- averaged 2.77%, up from 2.69%, Freddie Mac said Thursday. Borrowers would have paid lenders 0.7% of the loan amount on average to obtain the rates, according to the survey , which asks lenders about the terms they are offering to rock-solid borrowers.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Reserve, maintaining its aggressive efforts to stimulate a slow-growing economy burdened by high unemployment, said it would continue its large-scale bond-buying programs in the new year and, for the first time, announced explicit unemployment- and inflation-rate targets for when the central bank would raise interest rates.   Top Fed policymakers, at the end of their last meeting of the year Wednesday, left short-term interest rates near zero and said they were now likely to keep them there until the jobless rate fell to 6.5% or lower and the medium-term outlook for inflation exceeded 2.5%.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Stocks jumped after the Federal Reserve said it would keep interest rates low as long as the unemployment rate stays above 6.5%. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 65 points, or 0.5%, to 13,314 in midday trading. The broader Standard & Poor's 500 index gained 10 points, or 0.7%, to 1,438. The technology-heavy Nasdaq rose 6 points, or 0.2%, to 3,028. The Fed also announced it would spend $45 billion a month buying Treasury bonds to keep long-term rates low. The central bank has embarked on large-scale bond buying as a way to lure investors into riskier assets such as stocks.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Pay for performance works in the corporate world, and it might be the way to fix the dysfunction in the nation's capital, said former Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Chairwoman Sheila Bair. Just as corporate directors frequently get half of their compensation in stock, members of Congress and the president should get half their pay in 10-year Treasury bonds, Bair said in a blog post Tuesday at Fortune.com. "Running a business and running a government are obviously different, but when it comes to compensation, government could probably learn a few things from well-managed corporations," said Bair, who served as the head of the FDIC from 2006 to 2011.
BUSINESS
September 13, 2012 | By Don Lee and Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Reserve, hoping to give another shot in the arm to the pallid recovery, announced it would launch a new round of a controversial bond-buying stimulus program. The central bank also further extended its pledge to keep short-term interest rates near zero, now through the middle of 2015. The widely expected Fed actions, unveiled Thursday after a two-day policy meeting here, are aimed at driving down interest rates to boost investment and spending, thereby spurring economic growth and in particular the sluggish job market.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Prices of Treasury bonds sagged again Thursday, reversing course at midday in a drop that erased a modest rally. The Treasury's benchmark 30-year bond, which has fallen more than a point over the past two sessions, lost another 9/16 point, or just over $5 for every $1,000 in face value. It had been up more than 1/4 point in the morning. Its yield, which rises when prices fall, advanced to 8.46% from 8.40% late Wednesday.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1993 | KATHY M. KRISTOF
The Clinton Administration's move to lower the government's borrowing costs by adjusting its issuance of Treasury securities already has noticeably affected consumers and borrowers. The Treasury announced Wednesday that it would reduce sales of its 30-year bonds and boost sales of short-term Treasury bills. Within hours of the announcement, rates rose on adjustable mortgages but fell on new fixed-rate mortgages.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Michael Hiltzik
For a 77-year-old, Social Security is looking pretty spry today, the anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt's signing of the Social Security Act in 1935. The program covers more than 54 million Americans, providing a dignified retirement and keeping the families of premature deceased workers out of poverty.  Among those who should be celebrating: Rep. Paul D. Ryan, R-Wisc., the newly-anointed GOP candidate for vice-president. As has been widely reported , Ryan's father died in 1986, when the future congressman was 16. The younger Ryan collected Social Security survivor benefits, which he put away for college, until the age of 18. Yet he returned the favor by proposing one of the most draconian plans to privatize Social Security in 2005.
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