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Treaty Violations

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NEWS
August 13, 1989 | from Associated Press
The military accused the United States on Friday of intimidation and treaty violations, and the foreign minister said Panama was "an invasion site in which only the order to fire is lacking." After three days of U.S. military maneuvers and confrontations with Panamanian soldiers, the military issued a statement saying the Panamanian Defense Forces are facing "situations of intimidation and aggression by forces belonging to the Southern Command of the United States."
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NATIONAL
October 15, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
As the Bush administration deals with the fallout from the recent killings of civilians by private security firms in Iraq, some officials are asking whether the contractors could be considered unlawful combatants under international agreements. The question is an outgrowth of federal reviews of the shootings, in part because the U.S. officials want to determine whether the administration could be accused of treaty violations that could fuel an international outcry.
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NEWS
October 24, 1989 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze, reversing years of denials, admitted Monday that the Soviet Union had violated a key arms control treaty with the United States by building a huge radar complex in Siberia.
WORLD
September 25, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin and Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writers
The United Nations atomic energy agency voted Saturday to condemn Iran's nuclear activities, but the divisive vote was less than a clear victory for the U.S. administration's effort to prevent Tehran from acquiring atomic weapons. The agency found Iran in noncompliance with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and required that the country be reported to the U.N. Security Council at an unspecified date. One country, Venezuela, voted against the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1990
Wilmington's filmography was pretty good. However, I feel that there were several other films that could be added to that list. They are: "Hondo" (1953). John Wayne is Hondo, a white man who's lived with the Apaches, and Michael Pate is Vittorio, an Apache chief who's angered by treaty violations. "Chief Crazy Horse" (1955). Victor Mature is the greatest Indian chief of all time and John Lund is a cavalry major. "The Light in the Forest"(1958). James MacArthur is a white boy raised by Indians who must return and live with a white family.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union has taken "significant action" in the past year to improve its compliance with arms-control agreements, the Bush Administration said Friday in releasing an annual report on arms-control violations. Some "serious concerns about noncompliance remain," the report stated, but in nearly all cases the Soviet Union has taken steps to reduce U.S. objections.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | Reuters
Iraq said Sunday an Iranian force killed one of its soldiers and kidnaped nine others in a cross-border raid last week, violating the U.N.-brokered cease-fire that ended their eight-year war. The official Iraqi News Agency, monitored here, said a complaint was sent to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
October 30, 1988
The Soviets may have violated a troop withdrawal agreement by deploying up to 30 high-performance ground support warplanes in Afghanistan, U.S. officials said. The New York Times, which first reported the presence of the warplanes that were identified as MIG-27s, quoted an unidentified official as predicting a new Soviet offensive. Afghan rebels battling the Kabul regime confirmed the presence of two squadrons of MIG-27s at Shindand near the Iranian border, one U.S. official said.
NEWS
September 1, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union acknowledged Wednesday that its warplanes had aided Afghan government forces fighting for control of Kunduz in northern Afghanistan, but spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov denied U.S. charges that the action violated the April 14 agreement on ending the Afghan conflict. "We are abiding by the Geneva agreement," Gerasimov told a news conference, arguing that Pakistan through its support of the Muslim guerrillas is the principal violator of the accord.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | R. JEFFREY SMITH, The Washington Post
Members of a U.S. team stationed at the Soviet Union's principal nuclear test site were recently caught by Soviet authorities trying to ship prohibited, militarily sensitive Soviet materials to the United States, prompting a formal diplomatic protest by Moscow, U.S. officials said Thursday.
NEWS
April 8, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anatoly Kuntsevich, the retired army general assigned to abolish Russia's chemical and biological warfare programs but lately accused of working to prolong them, was dismissed from his post Thursday. A one-sentence Kremlin announcement said only that Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired Kuntsevich for "numerous and gross violations" of his duties as chairman of Yeltsin's Committee on Problems of Chemical and Biological Disarmament.
NEWS
September 15, 1992 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia on Monday admitted violating an international germ warfare ban until last March but said it has now agreed to open its laboratories to U.S. inspectors on a reciprocal basis to reassure Washington that all violations have ceased.
NEWS
July 28, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq's violations of U.N. resolutions in recent weeks have resulted in "significant" deaths of Iraqi Shiite Muslims during a new military offensive and have virtually blocked humanitarian efforts by relief organizations, according to new details released by Bush Administration sources Monday. Although U.S. officials refused to be specific, one source said the death toll in the Shiite-dominated south is "growing daily" and has reached a level high enough to "draw a lot of attention."
NEWS
January 21, 1992 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States is asking leaders of the former Soviet Union to explain the test firings of at least one and probably two intercontinental missiles last month in apparent violation of the Strategic Arms Limitation Treaty, officials said Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1991 | MARK POWELL, Mark Powell, a former assistant editor of the foreign-affairs quarterly Orbis and writer of McDonnell Douglas training materials for the pre-Gulf War Kuwait Air Force, writes on international affairs
Rep. Philip M. Crane (R-Ill.) has introduced legislation mandating new negotiations with Panama to secure U.S. military base rights after transfer of the Panama Canal and to clarify and solidify U.S. defense rights regarding the canal. America has had no overseas possession more vital or better paid-for. The 51-mile canal saves a voyage around Cape Horn, cuts at least 8,000 miles off transit between the U.S. coasts and currently can accommodate 92% of ships afloat and 95% of U.S. naval vessels.
NEWS
April 15, 1991 | Reuters
Iraq said Sunday an Iranian force killed one of its soldiers and kidnaped nine others in a cross-border raid last week, violating the U.N.-brokered cease-fire that ended their eight-year war. The official Iraqi News Agency, monitored here, said a complaint was sent to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
NEWS
July 21, 1988 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration scoffed Wednesday at a Soviet proposal tying the dismantling of a controversial radar station to an extension of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty. "It should be torn down with no strings and no deals," White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said.
NEWS
July 11, 1988 | ROBERT C. TOTH, Times Staff Writer
By a slim 3-to-2 margin, key government agencies last week recommended to President Reagan that he accuse the Soviet Union of having committed a "material breach" of the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty when it constructed a huge phased-array radar station at Krasnoyarsk, according to informed sources.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1990
Wilmington's filmography was pretty good. However, I feel that there were several other films that could be added to that list. They are: "Hondo" (1953). John Wayne is Hondo, a white man who's lived with the Apaches, and Michael Pate is Vittorio, an Apache chief who's angered by treaty violations. "Chief Crazy Horse" (1955). Victor Mature is the greatest Indian chief of all time and John Lund is a cavalry major. "The Light in the Forest"(1958). James MacArthur is a white boy raised by Indians who must return and live with a white family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1990 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge denied bail Friday for a Mexican suspect in the Enrique Camarena murder case who had earlier been ordered released on the grounds that his abduction by bounty hunters in Guadalajara violated the United States' extradition treaty with Mexico. U.S. District Judge Edward Rafeedie said the suspect, Dr. Humberto Alvarez Machain, was a "flight risk." Rafeedie said that Alvarez had failed to show that he could secure property or cash to post his bail.
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