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OPINION
November 21, 2013
Re "Bough wow," Nov. 19 That Steven Craig and other major mall operators pay $1,000 a foot to have these majestic trees ripped from the earth to be transplanted and die in shopping malls reeks of selfish greed. The true goal is to lure shoppers to spend on oftentimes unwanted and wasteful products, many made in China and other countries where we have sold out our workforce to those employed in the confines of sweatshops. The true meaning of Christmas was lost many generations ago. Far more meaningful - and in place of these monster trees that have lost their oxygen-producing, carbon-consuming values - might be a smaller, locally grown tree next to a Nativity scene.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1991
Three cheers to The Times for recognizing the importance of trees to our cities. "A Bad Times for Trees" (editorial, Nov. 14) outlined the importance of trees and the problems cities face with declining budgets--chopping funds dedicated to tree planting and maintenance. Trees are only one dimension of the urban forests; plants, lawns and shrubs also play a major role in a healthy environment. As everyone fights for his piece of the budget pie, it is important to remember the benefits of green landscaping, our only mitigation for urbanization: --Landscaping helps our environment by cleaning and cooling the air. Landscaping traps about 12 million tons of dust and dirt released annually into the atmosphere.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
Scientists who gathered decades of measurements from hundreds of thousands of trees all over the world are punching a hole in the common assumption that large, old trees are biologically pretty much over the hill. To the contrary, researchers found that the senior trees have rapid growth rates and keep capturing carbon - lots of it. "The growth rate just keeps increasing as trees get bigger," said study leader Nate Stephenson, a California-based research ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000
We, the public, have spent decades fighting to hang on to our area's magnificent public views, and here they have gone and done it again. It's bad enough to have to try to eliminate "salt bush" encroachment from obliterating the ocean view along the coast. We have also had a long, arduous fight to eliminate, or at least minimize, most land developers' predisposition for installing "berms" to hide their projects. Berms, like those "temporary" mounds of dirt topped off by 40-foot trees constructed along the inland side of Pacific Coast Highway, have wiped out the view of the coastal hills and mountains.
NATIONAL
July 30, 2009 | DeeDee Correll, Correll writes for The Times.
A Colorado ski resort town has abandoned a short-lived attempt to require residents to take steps to protect their homes from wildfire. Town leaders in Breckenridge decided this week to revoke an ordinance ordering homeowners to thin vegetation around their houses -- a mandate that, though common in California, remains unusual in other Western states.
NATIONAL
December 25, 2012 | By Matt Pearce, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
A Christmas Day tornado touched down west of downtown Mobile, Ala., on Tuesday afternoon, knocking down trees and power lines and damaging property. No injuries were immediately reported. Amateur video of the twister showed a funnel churning through the city, occasionally illuminated by exploding electrical transformers. The Mobile Fire Department said it had received reports of downed limbs, power lines, gas leaks and damage at Murphy High School inside the city . The department tweeted that it had not been "overwhelmed" by calls.
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