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Tri Agency Resource Gang Enforcement

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1-million federal grant awarded this week to bolster Orange County's anti-gang efforts caps an unconventional alliance between law enforcement leaders and UC Irvine criminologists studying how well police programs work. "We're going to be able to get at issues that have to do with how accurately police report gang crimes," said Bryan Vila, UCI assistant professor of criminology.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A $1-million federal grant awarded this week to bolster Orange County's anti-gang efforts caps an unconventional alliance between law enforcement leaders and UC Irvine criminologists studying how well police programs work. "We're going to be able to get at issues that have to do with how accurately police report gang crimes," said Bryan Vila, UCI assistant professor of criminology.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1994 | FERNANDO ROMERO
Following the example of the Westminster Police Department's successful gang unit, three county law enforcement agencies are joining efforts to go after hard-core gang members in South County, police officials announced Monday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2002 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gang-related homicides rose for the first time in a decade, according to a report released Wednesday by the Orange County district attorney's office. There were 18 homicides recorded last year, compared with 16 in 2000. That's still a fraction of the more than 70 gang killings the county recorded in the early 1990s, when gang warfare was at its height. Prosecutors said that other types of gang crime, including drug offenses, vandalism and probation violations, continued to decline last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993
The county district attorney's office, Probation Department and Westminster police are doing a good job with their innovative program to crack down on the toughest, most dangerous gang members. Other Orange County cities that have scaled-down versions of the program would be wise to study it and imitate it where possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1995
Gus Frias of the L.A. County Interagency Gang Task Force has the right idea about how to be effective in countering gang violence and gang membership ("Pull Together to Stop This Gang Epidemic," Commentary, Sept. 20). The Orange County Chiefs' & Sheriff's Assn. (OCC&SA), through its County-Wide Gang Strategy Steering Committee, has been working together against gangs for more than three years using the very strategies Frias suggests. Every city police chief, the sheriff, the district attorney, the chief probation officer, the county marshal and the FBI special agent in charge have been involved in this effort, along with gang investigators, school superintendents and principals, county Department of Education staff, community organizations and leaders from the religious and business communities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1993 | LILY DIZON
An innovative gang crackdown program run by the Westminster Police Department won high marks with the Orange County Grand Jury, which has recommended that other cities implement similar programs. The jury's report, which analyzed how gangs affect the community and recommended some solutions, also commended the Tri-Agency Resource Gang Enforcement Team, or TARGET, for its "tremendous success after one year of operation."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1993
Sheriff Brad Gates' refusal to take part in an innovative, proven anti-gang program is disappointing. Other county officials are understandably upset by his stance and perplexed by his reasons. "I don't have to participate in the district attorney's plan," Gates said. That's technically true, because he is an elected official. "This has nothing to do with me," Gates added. He is wrong on that score.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County is expected to receive a $1-million grant today from President Clinton as part of a new anti-gang initiative that aims to fight youth crime through community policing. The Orange County Police Chiefs' and Sheriff's Assn. learned only Saturday that its cooperative anti-gang proposal was among 15 selected across the country, Westminster Police Chief James Cook said. "The thing they were interested in in Washington was the fact that we are all working together," Cook said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1993
Westminster has registered remarkable success with an innovative program, described as the first of its kind in California, that concentrates resources from three agencies against gangs. Now, in a welcome development, Orange County Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi is pushing county officials to expand the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1996 | LEE ROMNEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Department of Justice handed a $1-million grant Wednesday to the Orange County Police Chiefs and Sheriff's Assn. as part of $11 million awarded nationwide to innovative anti-gang programs. President Clinton was scheduled to personally launch the anti-gang initiative at a noon news conference in Washington, but the event was canceled after a plane carrying Secretary of Commerce Ron Brown and business leaders crashed in Croatia.
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