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April 21, 1990 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tri-Star Pictures has purchased the screen rights to Robert Ferrigno's first novel, "The Horse Latitudes," for an undisclosed sum. The former newspaper feature writer's mystery novel, which is set in Long Beach and Orange County, will be producer Michael Shamberg's first project for Tri-Star. According to a story on Shamberg in Daily Variety this week, the producer of "A Fish Called Wanda" became interested in Ferrigno's book after reading an early rave review.
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BUSINESS
July 16, 1996 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sony Pictures Entertainment officially got its cable guy on Monday, confirming that it has hired Home Box Office movie chief Robert Cooper to run its TriStar Pictures unit. The hiring, which had been expected for several days, is part of a broader executive revamping at the company, which operates the Columbia and TriStar studio units.
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BUSINESS
July 17, 1987 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Tri-Star Pictures announced Thursday that its largest shareholder has agreed to increase its stake, paying a premium over the market price to invest another $50 million in the 5-year-old entertainment company. If approved by Tri-Star's board next week, a subsidiary of Coca-Cola Co. will acquire 3.3 million new shares of common stock at $15 per share. The new shares would increase Coca-Cola's ownership interest to 29.3%, up from 23.4% on a fully diluted basis.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A long-anticipated shake-up could take place at TriStar Pictures with Robert Cooper, president of HBO Pictures, taking over for Marc Platt as president of the studio, according to sources at TriStar parent Sony Pictures Entertainment. Neither Sony nor Home Box Office would comment, but Hollywood sources said Friday that the deal was nearly completed. Although Sony is hoping to give Platt a production deal to prevent a hefty contract settlement, sources say it seems unlikely that Platt will stay.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1988 | KATHRYN HARRIS, Times Staff Writer
Tri-Star Pictures, created as an instant "major" studio in New York six years ago by heavyweight partners Home Box Office, Columbia Pictures and CBS, announced Thursday that it will shift its New York operations to Burbank. By mid-1989, Tri-Star executives expect to be headquartered in the high-rise Studio Plaza now under construction next to the Burbank Studios, where a sister company--Columbia Pictures--is located.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying there has been no interference in content from its Japanese owners, Tri-Star Pictures on Friday revealed its first production schedule under Sony Corp. ownership. The ambitious program will put 15 feature films before the cameras during 1991, involving such filmmakers as David Lean, Steven Spielberg, Milos Forman and Roland Joffe, and stars Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro, Robin Williams, Michael Douglas and Julia Roberts.
BUSINESS
March 11, 1985
The New York-based motion picture company reached an agreement to co-finance the development of theatrical projects by the newly formed Chestnut Hill Productions over the next two years. Under the terms of the deal, Tri-Star has the right of first refusal on the projects and will finance the productions it accepts. Chestnut Hill is a private firm formed by Jeffrey Lurie, a member of the family that controls the largest block of stock of General Cinema Corp.
BUSINESS
January 15, 1985 | DALE POLLOCK
Tri-Star Pictures made two key executive changes Monday, naming marketing and distribution chief David Matalon president of the 2-year-old movie company and appointing Jeff Sagansky, a 32-year-old television executive, as its president of production. Matalon, 41, who was executive vice president for worldwide distribution and marketing, will assume only part of the responsibilities held by Tri-Star's former president and chief operating officer, Gary Hendler, who resigned last December.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sony, Coke Settle Shareholder Suit Over TriStar Deal: The electronics giant and the Atlanta-based beverage maker agreed to pay $22.5 million to settle a lingering shareholder suit related to Coke's 1987 acquisition of the TriStar studio. The settlement, which requires the approval of Delaware Chancery Court, follows a 1993 ruling that found that Coca-Cola Corp. mistreated TriStar's minority shareholders when it more than doubled its stake in the TV television and movie production company to 80%.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1995 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Best-selling author Dean Koontz wants his name off the upcoming movie of his 1992 suspense thriller "Hideaway" because he thinks the screen version is too violent. But TriStar, the studio releasing the film, says that's tough noogies. An item in Liz Smith's syndicated column today (see F4) says Koontz, who lives in Newport Beach, "demanded" to have his name removed from the credits.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Marketing and distribution executives at Columbia Pictures and TriStar Pictures have been on edge since August, when it was announced that the two Sony Pictures Entertainment divisions would be merged. The ax fell Thursday, with dozens of staff members, including some executives, losing their jobs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1994 | JUDY BRENNAN
TriStar's high-profile Western, the Sharon Stone vehicle "The Quick and the Dead," has high-tailed it out of town--at least for the rest of this year, as the studio reportedly has become concerned about over-saturation of Westerns, as well as overexposure of Stone and co-star Gene Hackman.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1994 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The family of Geoffrey Bowers, a lawyer who brought one of the first AIDS employment discrimination cases in the United States, has filed a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against Hollywood producer Scott Rudin, TriStar Pictures and the creators of the movie "Philadelphia," charging that the film is substantially based on Bowers' story.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1994 | ALAN CITRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood was rocked by a double dose of management upheaval Friday, when Tristar Pictures Chairman Mike Medavoy resigned and Columbia Pictures Chairman Mark Canton was promoted to a new position running both studios. Medavoy's departure had been anticipated in industry circles for months.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1987 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Frank Price, a one-time television writer who later headed two major Hollywood film studios, will make movies once again for Coca-Cola Co., owner of Columbia Pictures, it was announced Wednesday. Price was Columbia's chief executive from 1979 to 1983. This time around, the 57-year-old Price has signed to produce films under a three-year deal with Tri-Star Pictures, which is being merged with Columbia under a new umbrella firm, Columbia Pictures Entertainment.
BUSINESS
March 7, 1989 | AL DELUGACH, Times Staff Writer
Tri-Star Pictures, ranked as a major Hollywood studio, has been demoted to being a unit of its affiliate, Columbia Pictures, under a "streamlining" plan announced Monday. The announcement by Columbia Pictures Entertainment, the parent company of both studios, closely follows renewed industry reports that its biggest shareholder, Coca-Cola Co., is dickering to sell its 49% interest to Japanese giant Sony.
NEWS
December 9, 1993 | PANCHO DOLL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Philadelphia," the first movie by a Hollywood studio to confront AIDS and homophobia, will have its world premiere this month in Ventura. The Benefit Premiere will be held at 4 p.m. on Dec. l9 at the Ventura Century 8 Theater. Through the efforts of actress Mary Steenburgen, a Ventura County resident, and Ron Halleran, a local AIDS fund-raising organizer, TriStar Pictures has agreed to premiere the film as a benefit for AIDS Care, the Ventura County nonprofit organization that provides services to the HIV infected and their families.
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