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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2012 | By Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times
With "Desperate Housewives" winding up its lucrative eight-season run on ABC, its creator took a moment last week to distill what he called the show's "original blend" of television genres. "Part comedy, part drama, part mystery," Marc Cherry said. To the audience he addressed, a Los Angeles jury in a lawsuit brought by a former actress on the show, the concept of watching something that was by turns funny, sad and confounding was not a foreign one. The two-week trial set for closing arguments Tuesday often seemed a black comedy about a black comedy.
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SPORTS
April 22, 1989
Apart from the Jeff Koterba cartoon (April 13) depicting the (Norby) Walters-(Lloyd) Bloom trial as opening the Pandora's box of college sports deceits, the media seems to have missed the point. The trial was exploiting the deeper hypocrisy of college sports. If Walters and Bloom are guilty of fraud in advancing loans, then what about the fraud of the universities? It was really big business college sports that was on trial. RICHARD GUTTMAN Malibu
OPINION
January 13, 2010
Prop. 8 and the public Re "Supreme Court bars video of Prop. 8 trial," Jan. 12 The U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling that clearly indicates where it is likely to stand should the issue of marriage equality reach it directly. In what apparently was an 8-1 decision, the court ruled that broadcasting a U.S. District Court trial on the legality of Proposition 8 was unacceptable. Openness in the District Court proceedings thus will be denied to the general populace, and the activities and arguments of the trial will be publicized only via the filters of the media.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard
A former Fannie Mae employee was convicted late Friday of soliciting kickbacks from a broker with promises to steer lucrative listings of foreclosed homes his way. The federal court jury in Santa Ana convicted Armando Granillo of three counts of fraud, rejecting his contention that he intended to cheat only the broker, not Fannie Mae, the nation's largest home-finance firm. At the end of a two-day trial, the jury took less than two hours to convict Granillo, who sat grimly as each of the jurors affirmed the guilty verdicts.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | Associated Press
A court today recessed the trial of a Lebanese Shia Muslim accused in the 1985 hijacking of a TWA airliner after he refused to take part in the first day of proceedings. Mohammed Ali Hamadi, who is charged with murder and air piracy, cited disputes over his interpreter and his legal representation for his refusal to participate. "I don't say anything important until we have an interpreter," he said in broken German. The trial is scheduled to resume Thursday.
WORLD
February 16, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
A judge Tuesday ordered Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi to stand trial on charges that he paid for sex with a 17-year-old girl, then abused his authority by trying to get her released from custody after police picked her up on suspicion of stealing. It was a major setback for the 74-year-old premier, whose personal entanglements for months have overshadowed the business of governing Italy. Berlusconi denies any wrongdoing and says there is a plot by left-wing judges and his political foes to force him from office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2010 | Claire Noland, Los Angeles Times
Joseph Bosco, a freelance crime writer who secured one of the few permanent seats at the O.J. Simpson criminal trial and turned his observations into a nonfiction book about the murder case, has died. He was 61. Bosco died of natural causes July 8 in Beijing, where he had been living and working for the last several years, according to his son, Joe Bosco. He had been in poor health, his son said. "A Problem of Evidence: How the Prosecution Freed O.J. Simpson" (William Morrow) was Bosco's account of the 1995 trial of the former football star accused of murdering his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ron Goldman.
OPINION
January 23, 1994
Susan Estrich may be a professor of law, but in her article she demonstrated as much knowledge of the U.S. jury system as she did of political campaigning when she served as Michael Dukakis' campaign manager. While it is easy to sympathize with her major premise that perpetrators of an indictable act should not be depicted as victims, one must not fall into the trap of faulting American due process and the jury system. Lawyers for the defense are employed specifically to defend their clients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2009 | Maria L. La Ganga
The husband and wife accused of kidnapping Jaycee Lee Dugard 18 years ago, holding her captive and raping her will be held in jail until they stand trial in the next year or 18 months. El Dorado County Superior Court Judge Douglas Phimister ruled Monday that bail for Phillip Garrido, 58, should be set at $30 million. But because the convicted sex offender is also on a so-called hold for violating parole, there is no chance he would be set free on bail. In setting the high amount for Garrido's bail, Phimister said he considered "the protection of the public, the fact that Mr. Garrido was on parole at the time these events occurred allegedly, the seriousness of the charge and the fact that the court must consider the injuries to the victim."
OPINION
March 22, 2009
Re "Abortion doctor's trial to start," March 15 The Times' article on the upcoming trial of Kansas abortion provider George Tiller certainly conveyed the animosity that abortion opponents feel toward his work, but I am not sure it captured fully the degree to which abortion-rights supporters, such as myself, hold him in esteem. To many progressive Americans, George Tiller is a genuine hero who ranks alongside Susan B. Anthony and Martin Luther King Jr. in the pantheon of defenders of human liberty.
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