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Trials Russia

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NEWS
March 12, 1994 | Associated Press
Although the alleged leaders of the 1991 coup attempt against Mikhail S. Gorbachev apparently can't be punished, Russia's Supreme Court ruled Friday that they must stand trial, the Itar-Tass news agency reported. The dozen men--who once had been among the most powerful in the Kremlin--were having their cases heard by a military court.
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WORLD
March 25, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The prosecutors rear out like gargoyles from the walls overhead, fingers jabbing into the air. The massive cartoon faces of witnesses, lawyers and defendants crowd the walls, words popping in balloons from their lips. "Stand up!" commands a voice as visitors climb the stairs to the exhibition, invoking the opening moments of a trial. "The judge is coming." In a gutted perfume bottle factory on a nondescript street in downtown Moscow, an exhibit opening Friday paints a fantastic, caricatured dreamscape of the continuing trial of former oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An American Baptist youth pastor facing up to five years behind bars on smuggling charges went on trial here this week as scores of supporters across North America simultaneously fasted and prayed for his release. Andrew Okhotin, a student at Harvard Divinity School, is accused of trying to take $48,000 in cash through Moscow's main international airport without declaring it to customs officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
An American Baptist youth pastor facing up to five years behind bars on smuggling charges went on trial here this week as scores of supporters across North America simultaneously fasted and prayed for his release. Andrew Okhotin, a student at Harvard Divinity School, is accused of trying to take $48,000 in cash through Moscow's main international airport without declaring it to customs officials.
WORLD
March 25, 2010 | By Megan K. Stack
The prosecutors rear out like gargoyles from the walls overhead, fingers jabbing into the air. The massive cartoon faces of witnesses, lawyers and defendants crowd the walls, words popping in balloons from their lips. "Stand up!" commands a voice as visitors climb the stairs to the exhibition, invoking the opening moments of a trial. "The judge is coming." In a gutted perfume bottle factory on a nondescript street in downtown Moscow, an exhibit opening Friday paints a fantastic, caricatured dreamscape of the continuing trial of former oil magnate Mikhail Khodorkovsky.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon to go on trial for their lives, many of the 12 aging Soviet Communists who tried to wrest control of the Kremlin are making no secret of their determination to turn the case into the bruising inquisition of a former comrade: Mikhail S. Gorbachev. "Gorbachev was a traitor," charged former Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev, a baggy-eyed heavy drinker whose hands visibly quaked when he announced Aug. 19, 1991, that he was assuming the Soviet president's duties.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jury foreman looked pained. He had just awarded a whopping 70 million rubles to the bereaved family of a hypothetical accident victim, and it was a strange new sensation to put a price tag on a man's existence. "When it came to assessing the value of human life, that was the hardest part for us," foreman Lev Khaldeyev said. "In our country, no court had ever considered this." Now it has.
NEWS
August 21, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX
"The lawyer has never been a popular character in Russian literature," says Sergei A. Pashin, a hard-working, soft-spoken legal scholar whose mission is to bring his profession--and the law itself--at least some respect. Pashin, 31, leads the reform unit of President Boris N. Yeltsin's State Legal Agency. For two years, he has been campaigning for the "bourgeois" concepts--such as presumption of innocence--that Soviet professors taught him to reject.
NEWS
February 18, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
A Holocaust expert, testifying Tuesday at the war crimes trial of retired U.S. auto worker John Demjanjuk, said he has found no evidence to support rumors that a Nazi guard known as "Ivan the Terrible" was killed in a 1943 uprising by inmates of the Treblinka death camp. Israel contends that Demjanjuk was "Ivan the Terrible." The Ukrainian-born former resident of Cleveland, Ohio, insists he is a victim of mistaken identity.
NEWS
February 17, 1994 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embracing U.S. scientific standards, Russia has decided to allow near-automatic importation of hundreds of thousands of prescription and over-the-counter drugs made by American companies, the Clinton Administration announced Wednesday. The decision should significantly enhance public health in a country whose quality of health care has deteriorated in recent years along with its overall economy, officials said. It also could boost long-term profits for U.S. pharmaceutical companies, they said.
NEWS
March 12, 1994 | Associated Press
Although the alleged leaders of the 1991 coup attempt against Mikhail S. Gorbachev apparently can't be punished, Russia's Supreme Court ruled Friday that they must stand trial, the Itar-Tass news agency reported. The dozen men--who once had been among the most powerful in the Kremlin--were having their cases heard by a military court.
NEWS
March 4, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soon to go on trial for their lives, many of the 12 aging Soviet Communists who tried to wrest control of the Kremlin are making no secret of their determination to turn the case into the bruising inquisition of a former comrade: Mikhail S. Gorbachev. "Gorbachev was a traitor," charged former Vice President Gennady I. Yanayev, a baggy-eyed heavy drinker whose hands visibly quaked when he announced Aug. 19, 1991, that he was assuming the Soviet president's duties.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The jury foreman looked pained. He had just awarded a whopping 70 million rubles to the bereaved family of a hypothetical accident victim, and it was a strange new sensation to put a price tag on a man's existence. "When it came to assessing the value of human life, that was the hardest part for us," foreman Lev Khaldeyev said. "In our country, no court had ever considered this." Now it has.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Systematic torture to extract confessions is a widespread practice among Russian police and occurs in as many as half of all criminal cases, according to a study by Human Rights Watch to be released today. During initial questioning of suspects, police commonly beat their captives, apply electric shocks, nearly asphyxiate them or hang them by the arms or legs to produce admissions of guilt that almost always hold up in court, the study found.
WORLD
December 14, 2005 | Alissa J. Rubin, Times Staff Writer
For years in his Austrian homeland the tabloid papers affectionately referred to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger as "Our Arnie." On Tuesday, after he refused to pardon convicted murderer Stanley Tookie Williams, a headline on the front page of one of the country's largest newspapers was "Terminator." Williams was executed by lethal injection early Tuesday morning after a worldwide campaign to persuade Schwarzenegger or U.S. courts to spare him.
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