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BUSINESS
September 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Triarc Cos. Inc., the Atlanta-based operator of Arby's, completed its $2.34-billion takeover of Dublin, Ohio-based Wendy's International Inc.
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BUSINESS
September 30, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Triarc Cos. Inc., the Atlanta-based operator of Arby's, completed its $2.34-billion takeover of Dublin, Ohio-based Wendy's International Inc.
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BUSINESS
July 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Fast-food chain operator Triarc Cos. said billionaire investor Nelson Peltz resigned as chairman and chief executive and would be succeeded as CEO by Roland Smith, chief executive of Arby's Restaurant Group Inc. The changes had been expected as part of a restructuring plan and were outlined in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing May 1. Triarc is repositioning itself as a pure-play restaurant operator from a more diversified investment manager.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Shareholders of Wendy's International Inc. and Triarc Cos. approved a $2.34-billion deal that would make Wendy's, the nation's No. 3 hamburger chain, a part of billionaire investor Nelson Peltz's empire. Directors of both companies had already approved the transaction. Atlanta-based Triarc operates the Arby's fast-food chain and is owned by Peltz. Triarc said in April that it would buy Dublin, Ohio-based Wendy's for $26.78 a share in an all-stock deal.
BUSINESS
September 16, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Shareholders of Wendy's International Inc. and Triarc Cos. approved a $2.34-billion deal that would make Wendy's, the nation's No. 3 hamburger chain, a part of billionaire investor Nelson Peltz's empire. Directors of both companies had already approved the transaction. Atlanta-based Triarc operates the Arby's fast-food chain and is owned by Peltz. Triarc said in April that it would buy Dublin, Ohio-based Wendy's for $26.78 a share in an all-stock deal.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arby's Won't Buy Long John Silver's: Citing higher interest rates, the parent of the roast beef restaurant chain called off its planned purchase of the seafood restaurants. Triarc Cos.' plan to buy Lexington, Ky.-based Long John Silver's for $525 million would have created the sixth-largest fast-food company in the country.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
Triarc Cos. is in talks to merge its Arby's chain with its largest franchisee, RTM Restaurant Group, which would be followed by an initial public offering of stock for the combined unit. New York-based Triarc franchises the chain and operates about 235 Arby's restaurants in the United States. RTM operates and franchises more than 700 restaurants. Triarc said it planned to be the majority owner of the combined entity. Some of the IPO proceeds would be used to pay the owners of RTM.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The owner of Royal Crown and Mistic soft drinks and Arby's restaurants said it plans to spin off its beverage and fast-food businesses, leaving itself with energy and textile operations. Triarc Cos. said the move will make it easier for the new food and drink operation to raise money for expansion. The new company, which has yet to be named, represents products that account for about 65% of the $1 billion in revenue that Triarc expects to generate this year.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing one of the worst flops in corporate-merger history, Quaker Oats Co. agreed Thursday to sell Snapple Beverage Corp. to Triarc Cos. for $300 million, only 27 months after Quaker spent $1.7 billion to buy the maker of trendy drinks. The Quaker-Snapple fiasco joins such ill-fated business marriages as AT&T Corp. and computer maker NCR and General Electric Co. and defunct brokerage house Kidder, Peabody & Co.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Triarc Cos., owner of Snapple drinks and Arby's restaurants, said Chairman Nelson Peltz and President Peter May on Monday offered to take the company private at $18 a share, or about $440 million. Triarc said its directors formed a special committee to evaluate the buyout offer, which is for an unspecified mix of cash and securities. Investors said they're not surprised by the offer from Peltz and May, two proteges of junk-bond trader Michael Milken with a history of buying assets on the cheap.
BUSINESS
July 6, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Fast-food chain operator Triarc Cos. said billionaire investor Nelson Peltz resigned as chairman and chief executive and would be succeeded as CEO by Roland Smith, chief executive of Arby's Restaurant Group Inc. The changes had been expected as part of a restructuring plan and were outlined in a Securities and Exchange Commission filing May 1. Triarc is repositioning itself as a pure-play restaurant operator from a more diversified investment manager.
BUSINESS
January 20, 2005 | From Dow Jones/Associated Press
Triarc Cos. is in talks to merge its Arby's chain with its largest franchisee, RTM Restaurant Group, which would be followed by an initial public offering of stock for the combined unit. New York-based Triarc franchises the chain and operates about 235 Arby's restaurants in the United States. RTM operates and franchises more than 700 restaurants. Triarc said it planned to be the majority owner of the combined entity. Some of the IPO proceeds would be used to pay the owners of RTM.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | SKIP WOLLENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cadbury Schweppes, the British company known for its bubbly tonic water, agreed Monday to buy the Snapple line of tea and juice drinks from Triarc Cos. The beverage and candy maker would also add Royal Crown, Diet Rite and Nehi to its roster of carbonated soft drinks led by 7-Up and Dr Pepper under the deal announced Monday with Triarc, based in New York. That would boost Cadbury's share of the $58-billion U.S. market for carbonated beverages by about 1.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
Triarc Cos., owner of Snapple drinks and Arby's restaurants, said Chairman Nelson Peltz and President Peter May on Monday offered to take the company private at $18 a share, or about $440 million. Triarc said its directors formed a special committee to evaluate the buyout offer, which is for an unspecified mix of cash and securities. Investors said they're not surprised by the offer from Peltz and May, two proteges of junk-bond trader Michael Milken with a history of buying assets on the cheap.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Closing one of the worst flops in corporate-merger history, Quaker Oats Co. agreed Thursday to sell Snapple Beverage Corp. to Triarc Cos. for $300 million, only 27 months after Quaker spent $1.7 billion to buy the maker of trendy drinks. The Quaker-Snapple fiasco joins such ill-fated business marriages as AT&T Corp. and computer maker NCR and General Electric Co. and defunct brokerage house Kidder, Peabody & Co.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The owner of Royal Crown and Mistic soft drinks and Arby's restaurants said it plans to spin off its beverage and fast-food businesses, leaving itself with energy and textile operations. Triarc Cos. said the move will make it easier for the new food and drink operation to raise money for expansion. The new company, which has yet to be named, represents products that account for about 65% of the $1 billion in revenue that Triarc expects to generate this year.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | SKIP WOLLENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cadbury Schweppes, the British company known for its bubbly tonic water, agreed Monday to buy the Snapple line of tea and juice drinks from Triarc Cos. The beverage and candy maker would also add Royal Crown, Diet Rite and Nehi to its roster of carbonated soft drinks led by 7-Up and Dr Pepper under the deal announced Monday with Triarc, based in New York. That would boost Cadbury's share of the $58-billion U.S. market for carbonated beverages by about 1.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pending merger of the Arby's and Long John Silver's restaurant chains is the most visible example yet of a trend in the industry: serving two brands of food under a single roof. Triarc Cos., corporate parent of Arby's, said Wednesday it has agreed to buy Long John Silver's Restaurants Inc. for $525 million in cash, a deal that would create the nation's sixth-largest fast-food chain, with $2.5 billion in annual revenue and 4,250 locations.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arby's Won't Buy Long John Silver's: Citing higher interest rates, the parent of the roast beef restaurant chain called off its planned purchase of the seafood restaurants. Triarc Cos.' plan to buy Lexington, Ky.-based Long John Silver's for $525 million would have created the sixth-largest fast-food company in the country.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1994 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The pending merger of the Arby's and Long John Silver's restaurant chains is the most visible example yet of a trend in the industry: serving two brands of food under a single roof. Triarc Cos., corporate parent of Arby's, said Wednesday it has agreed to buy Long John Silver's Restaurants Inc. for $525 million in cash, a deal that would create the nation's sixth-largest fast-food chain, with $2.5 billion in annual revenue and 4,250 locations.
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