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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Nobody thought much about the locked metal cabinet in the medical school at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. It was another forgotten fixture in the anatomy department - until a researcher last year found seven skulls with yellowing labels indicating the remains were those of Native Americans from California's Central Coast. Earlier this month, the skulls and several bone fragments were boxed and gingerly placed aboard a jet to LAX at London's Heathrow Airport.
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OPINION
April 15, 2009
Payday lenders are the bottom-feeders of the financial industry, offering short-term loans with high fees to borrowers who typically live from paycheck to paycheck. Even those that play by state rules can still ensnare over- extended borrowers in debt traps. Yet some payday lenders can't seem to live with any regulation at all.
NEWS
February 17, 2008 | Juliana Barbassa, Associated Press
The first time Jose Freeman heard his tribe's lost language through the crackle of a 70-year-old recording, he cried. "My ancestors were speaking to me," said Freeman of the sounds captured when American Indians still inhabited California's Salinas Valley. "It was like coming home." Although the last native speaker of Salinan died almost half a century ago, more and more indigenous people are finding their extinct or endangered tongues, one word or song at a time, thanks to a late linguist and some UC Davis scholars who are working to transcribe his life's obsession.
WORLD
March 1, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Haley Sweetland Edwards, Los Angeles Times
Having endured wars, rebellions and an ongoing battle with Al Qaeda, Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh may not be easily toppled from power by the bloodshed and protests inspired by the unrest that brought down the leaders of Egypt and Tunisia. Saleh has spent the last 32 years co-opting and outflanking his enemies in an impoverished nation that often seems a gunshot away from implosion. Two weeks of daily demonstrations, which have grown more violent and widespread in recent days, have shaken his inner circle but have not dented his aplomb.
WORLD
January 4, 2009 | Edmund Sanders
In a sun-drenched valley of central Kenya, a few dozen villagers gather each Saturday to sit under the trees and conduct the painstaking work of reconciliation that their government leaders seem happy to avoid. These traumatized victims of Kenya's post-election clashes meet to talk, pray, sing and -- they hope -- heal.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2014 | By Christy Khoshaba
In Cameron Diaz's latest comedy, “The Other Woman,” the 41-year-old plays a woman seeking revenge against her boyfriend after discovering he has a wife and a girlfriend. Tsk, tsk. In real life, Diaz says, infidelity unfortunately strikes us all. "Everybody has been cheated on, everyone will be cheated on,” she told Britain's OK! magazine (via the New York Daily News). “I can't fix that, I don't know how, I don't have any judgment on anybody, I don't know how to fix the problem.” The blond actress has dated high-profile celebrities including Jared Leto, Justin Timberlake and Alex Rodriguez.
NATIONAL
November 19, 2013 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON -- When Congress awarded the Congressional Gold Medal to the famous Navajo code talkers a decade ago, it failed to recognize members of other tribes who also used their native tongues to transmit wartime messages the enemy could not decipher. This week, the "forgotten" heroes from 33 tribes will receive the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation's highest civilian honor.  At least one code talker - 96-year-old Edmond Harjo, a member of the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma - is planning to attend the Capitol Hill ceremony Wednesday.
NATIONAL
October 12, 2012 | By Danielle Ryan
WASHINGTON - The Department of Justice announced a new policy broadening and clarifying the right of Native Americans to possess eagle feathers and other parts of the birds that they consider sacred but are protected by U.S. law. Federal wildlife laws prohibit the killing of eagles and the possession and commercialization of their feathers. While certain members of Indian tribes have been exempted, the wildlife laws have been a source of confusion among some tribes that feared prosecution for carrying out their customs and traditions.
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The judge deciding the fate of a 9,300-year-old skeleton known as "Kennewick Man" said he had "very serious concerns" over the Interior secretary's decision last year awarding the remains to Indian tribes. U.S. Magistrate John Jelderks in Portland also expressed frustration at not having a story in the oral traditions of the tribes that would identify the remains of what they call "the Ancient One" as an ancestor.
NEWS
August 16, 2012 | By Karin Klein
The issue hasn't gotten much statewide attention, but Gov. Jerry Brown has a decision to make on Indian gambling that could have major impacts down the road for the casino landscape. And that's the literal meaning of casino landscape. Previously, tribes with existing reservations have located their casinos on those reservations. Now, two tribes whose reservations are in difficult-to-access locations are seeking to build casinos miles from those reservations, near Northern California cities (Madera and Marysville)
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