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BUSINESS
April 11, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton and Jim Puzzanghera
Tribune Co.'s newspaper unit will pay a dividend of up to $275 million to its parent when it is spun off later this year, according to a government filing. The new Tribune Publishing Co. will own the Los Angeles Times and seven other newspapers. Shares of the company will trade on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol TPUB. Details about the dividend were made public in a lengthy filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission submitted late Friday. The dividend has sparked opposition from critics who say it would weigh on the company at a time of diminishing advertising revenue and intensifying digital competition.
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NEWS
September 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, the blunt-speaking, conservative Republican icon, is suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, according to a published report. Goldwater, 88, who made a spirited run for the presidency in 1964, also has had five "tiny strokes" since he was hospitalized last September with a major stroke, the Tribune newspaper in Phoenix reported.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Rep. Henry A. Waxman, after a 30-minute meeting with Tribune Co. Chief Executive Peter Liguori, said he still was concerned about the company's plans to spin off the Los Angeles Times and seven other newspapers into a separate unit. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) had requested the face-to-face discussion after a meeting last month between his staff and Tribune executives failed to ease his worries that the newspapers would be hobbled financially after the spinoff. "I expressed to him my concern that they not leave the L.A. Times and the other newspapers with inadequate funding," Waxman said in an interview Thursday.
NEWS
February 5, 1989
A Municipal Court judge in Oakland has cited The Tribune newspaper and one of its reporters for contempt for refusing to turn over notes of an interview with an informant whose tips reportedly led to the arrest of a reputed drug kingpin and two associates on suspicion of murder. Judge Carol A. Corrigan ordered reporter Harry Harris and the newspaper to pay fines of $1 a day until they turn over the notes, but she stayed the fines pending appeal.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2012 | By Joe Flint and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Peter Liguori, a former top executive at News Corp. and Discovery Communications, is expected to be named chief executive of Tribune Co. after the company emerges from bankruptcy, according to people familiar with the matter. Liguori is in advanced conversations with incoming owners, according to people who requested anonymity. An official announcement is expected after Tribune emerges from bankruptcy and names a new board of directors, which could occur as early as next month. Quiz: The week in business Tribune cleared a final regulatory hurdle Friday when the Federal Communications Commission granted waivers that pave the way for transfers of Tribune broadcast licenses to the eventual new owners of the company, a group led by Oaktree Capital Management, Angelo Gordon & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. The FCC's staff issued the waivers of its so-called cross-ownership rules, which restrict newspapers from combining with television and radio stations in the same market.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Oakland Tribune was held in contempt of court for refusing to turn over eight unpublished photographs subpoenaed by a protester who faced trial Wednesday for resisting arrest. "She ordered us to hand over [the] photos . . . and I said no," chief photographer Ron Riesterer said. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Taber on Tuesday delayed her order sending Riesterer to jail pending an appeal of the contempt citation by the newspaper.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1990 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The financially strapped Oakland Tribune, which in April won a Pulitzer Prize for photo coverage of last October's Bay Area Quake, will lay off 25% of its 725-member staff in an effort to stay afloat. Robert C. Maynard, the owner, also told employees that he is instituting a massive revamping designed to save more than $10 million a year in a further effort to keep the morning newspaper going.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Meg James and Walter Hamilton
Tribune Co., parent of the Los Angeles Times, is examining its operations in an effort that is likely to result in staff reductions at the company's daily newspapers. The company acknowledged a cost-cutting review is underway after Chicago business blogger Robert Feder wrote late Thursday that Tribune may slash as much as $100 million in expenses from its eight daily newspapers. A Tribune spokesman called Feder's report "grossly inaccurate" and said the company has not set an expense reduction target.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - David Copley, owner and publisher of the San Diego Union-Tribune until it was sold in 2009, died Tuesday after crashing his Aston Martin near his home in La Jolla. Copley, 60, was found slumped in the front seat of his car early in the evening and rushed to Scripps Memorial Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. He had left a board meeting of the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, saying he did not feel well. The cause of death was an apparent heart attack; Copley had received a heart transplant in 2005.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2012 | By Joe Flint and Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Peter Liguori, a former top executive at News Corp. and Discovery Communications, is expected to be named chief executive of Tribune Co. after the company emerges from bankruptcy, according to people familiar with the matter. Liguori is in advanced conversations with incoming owners, according to people who requested anonymity. An official announcement is expected after Tribune emerges from bankruptcy and names a new board of directors, which could occur as early as next month. Quiz: The week in business Tribune cleared a final regulatory hurdle Friday when the Federal Communications Commission granted waivers that pave the way for transfers of Tribune broadcast licenses to the eventual new owners of the company, a group led by Oaktree Capital Management, Angelo Gordon & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. The FCC's staff issued the waivers of its so-called cross-ownership rules, which restrict newspapers from combining with television and radio stations in the same market.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2004 | From Reuters
Tribune Co. said Friday that an internal investigation has uncovered more circulation problems at its two New York newspapers, forcing a further reduction in the overall numbers and resulting in a third-quarter charge of as much as $60 million to settle claims from advertisers. That charge follows a second-quarter pretax charge of $35 million for the estimated cost of settling claims from the initial circulation correction.
BUSINESS
July 20, 2004 | From Reuters
Circulation scandals that have rocked Tribune Co. newspapers Newsday and Spanish-language Hoy claimed the jobs of the publications' top two executives. Tribune, which also owns the Los Angeles Times, said it had named Newsday President Timothy Knight publisher of Newsday in Melville, N.Y., succeeding Ray Jansen, who is retiring. At Hoy in New York, Digby Solomon Diez was named interim publisher, succeeding Louis Sito, who also is retiring.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2002 | From Associated Press
The New York Times is buying out the Washington Post and taking sole control of the Paris-based International Herald Tribune. The Post told its reporters Tuesday that it agreed to the sale only after the Times threatened to drive the Herald Tribune into ruin. The Times said the sale was by mutual agreement but had no response to the Post's charges, which represented a rare airing of dirty laundry between two newspaper titans.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of hope for the financially beleaguered Oakland Tribune, Publisher Robert C. Maynard on Tuesday extended the deadline for closing the newspaper by 24 hours and said negotiations would continue "into the night" in the hope of resolving the paper's fiscal crisis. One Alameda County official said he believed that Maynard was close to striking a deal with Gannett Co., the Tribune's major creditor, to save the paper from bankruptcy.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiations at the struggling Tribune in Oakland continued Monday and were to resume today as union officials attempted to ease the effects of an 11% pay cut that management said is necessary to keep the newspaper alive.
NEWS
May 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Oakland Tribune was held in contempt of court for refusing to turn over eight unpublished photographs subpoenaed by a protester who faced trial Wednesday for resisting arrest. "She ordered us to hand over [the] photos . . . and I said no," chief photographer Ron Riesterer said. Alameda County Superior Court Judge Jacqueline Taber on Tuesday delayed her order sending Riesterer to jail pending an appeal of the contempt citation by the newspaper.
NEWS
September 15, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Former Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater, the blunt-speaking, conservative Republican icon, is suffering from the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, according to a published report. Goldwater, 88, who made a spirited run for the presidency in 1964, also has had five "tiny strokes" since he was hospitalized last September with a major stroke, the Tribune newspaper in Phoenix reported.
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