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Triglycerides

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NEWS
July 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
People who dramatically reduce their "bad" cholesterol still run the risk of heart disease from high levels of fatty acids known as triglycerides, USC researchers say. High cholesterol has been identified as an artery-clogger and a major contributor to heart attacks. But the role of triglycerides has been a subject of intense debate.
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NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Yessss, that's right, folks: Snake oil - maybe it's good for what ails you! The blood of a feeding python is coursing with fats that help the reptile's heart grow big and strong, according to scientists at the University of Colorado in Boulder. In a study just published in the journal Science, a team led by Leslie Leinwand decided to take a look at why the hearts of pythons enlarge so impressively after the snake has had one of its rare and very hearty meals. And we do mean impressively: Within 48 to 72 hours after feeding, the creature's heart expands its mass by 40%. Why does it do that?
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NEWS
October 27, 2011 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Yessss, that's right, folks: Snake oil - maybe it's good for what ails you! The blood of a feeding python is coursing with fats that help the reptile's heart grow big and strong, according to scientists at the University of Colorado in Boulder. In a study just published in the journal Science, a team led by Leslie Leinwand decided to take a look at why the hearts of pythons enlarge so impressively after the snake has had one of its rare and very hearty meals. And we do mean impressively: Within 48 to 72 hours after feeding, the creature's heart expands its mass by 40%. Why does it do that?
SCIENCE
August 5, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Heart health depends in no small part on diet and exercise, but genes are also crucial. Now, scientists involved in a massive genetic study have come a step closer to understanding the role of the latter, identifying 95 DNA regions associated with cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Of those regions, 59 had not previously been identified and may, with further research, lead to new treatment options. "It's a goldmine of new discovery," said Dr. Daniel Rader, a geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania medical school and coauthor of two new studies on the research.
HEALTH
January 19, 2004 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
A little bit of cinnamon might spice up your health. The aromatic bark can lower blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol levels, as well as improve insulin functioning, particularly in Type 2 diabetics, researchers have found. Richard Anderson, lead scientist at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Md., has been studying cinnamon and calls its medicinal properties the most significant nutritional discovery he's seen in 25 years.
HEALTH
August 30, 2004 | John Briley, Washington Post
Some days -- we've all been there -- the schedule is just too tight for a long stretch of exercise. So instead, you do a little bit here, a little bit there, and hope it all adds up. And yet you feel like you're cheating yourself. New research in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise may reassure you.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2010 | By Rachel Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
Heart health depends in no small part on diet and exercise, but genes are also crucial. Now, scientists involved in a massive genetic study have come a step closer to understanding the role of the latter, identifying 95 DNA regions associated with cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Of those regions, 59 had not previously been identified and may, with further research, lead to new treatment options. "It's a goldmine of new discovery," said Dr. Daniel Rader, a geneticist at the University of Pennsylvania medical school and coauthor of two new studies on the research.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | Reuters
People who think they have healthy levels of cholesterol may still be risking heart disease, scientists said Saturday. They said even "normal" levels of blood fats known as triglycerides were high enough to make heart disease likely. So-called normal levels of triglyceride are anywhere between 100 and 200 milligrams per deciliter of blood, a standard measurement of blood.
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Melissa Healy
Thinking of buying your kid a TV of his or her own for Christmas or Hannukah? Well here's a bit of advice from your friends at the American Journal of Preventive Medicine: Don't. It turns out there is a way to make television even more unhealthy for your children: Put a set in their bedroom. Research has long established that for kids, more "screen time" is linked to higher rates of obesity. A new study goes further. It finds not only that kids with a TV in their bedroom tend to watch more TV, which in itself should make them fatter, but also: Compared to television watched in, say, a family room, the screen time a kid logs in his or her bedroom is linked, hour-for-hour, to more belly fat, higher triglycerides and overall greater risk of developing heart disease and diabetes.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
GlaxoSmithKline will buy heart drug specialist Reliant Pharmaceuticals Inc. for $1.65 billion in cash, the company said. GSK expects the transaction will add to earnings in 2008 and create additional value in following years. Privately held Reliant develops specialty medicines combating heart disease and holds U.S. rights to Lovaza, a treatment for adult patients with very high levels of triglycerides.
HEALTH
August 30, 2004 | John Briley, Washington Post
Some days -- we've all been there -- the schedule is just too tight for a long stretch of exercise. So instead, you do a little bit here, a little bit there, and hope it all adds up. And yet you feel like you're cheating yourself. New research in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise may reassure you.
HEALTH
January 19, 2004 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
A little bit of cinnamon might spice up your health. The aromatic bark can lower blood sugar, triglycerides and cholesterol levels, as well as improve insulin functioning, particularly in Type 2 diabetics, researchers have found. Richard Anderson, lead scientist at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Beltsville, Md., has been studying cinnamon and calls its medicinal properties the most significant nutritional discovery he's seen in 25 years.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
People who dramatically reduce their "bad" cholesterol still run the risk of heart disease from high levels of fatty acids known as triglycerides, USC researchers say. High cholesterol has been identified as an artery-clogger and a major contributor to heart attacks. But the role of triglycerides has been a subject of intense debate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989
A new study found that exercise hastens the clearance of a common form of fat called triglycerides from the bloodstream, apparently explaining how workouts reduce the risk of heart attack. The study is the first to separate the effects of exercise from changes in the diet and weight loss, said Dr. Jan Breslow, who helped conduct the Rockefeller University in New York City study published in the American Heart Assn.'s journal Circulation.
NEWS
October 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cristoforo Pomaroli and Rosa Giovanelli had a son in 1780 in their small town in Italy, never knowing they bequeathed a genetic legacy that offers hope for reversing heart disease two centuries later. The boy's descendants in the northern Italian town of Limone inherited a genetic defect that protects them from the scourge of Western living--fatty deposits that clog the arteries.
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