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Trinity Broadcasting Network

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997
Today's question: Pat Boone lost his weekly gospel show on the religious Trinity Broadcasting Network after he showed up for a music award ceremony in heavymetal attire. He says the stunt--a promotional gimmick for a new album--had nothing to do with his mission to spread the Gospel. Is it ethical for people professing to be Christians to be so unforgiving by removing Boone from the air? Richard J.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1997
The Trinity Broadcasting Network, which pulled Pat Boone's half-hour "Gospel America" program indefinitely after the singer sauntered onto the American Music Awards show bare-chested with dark sunglasses and fake tattoos, announced Thursday that Boone and his pastor will appear on the network's "Praise" program.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1997 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
The Trinity Broadcasting Network's dropping of Pat Boone's weekly half-hour show is no laughing matter. At least not totally. It's understandable that viewers of the conservative Christian television network thought Boone had lost his mind when he went on ABC-TV's "American Music Awards" show Jan. 27 dressed like a heavy metal singer--tattoos, black leather and all. Who didn't?
NEWS
February 20, 1997 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
Singer Pat Boone, one of America's best-known Christian entertainers, has been taken off the air by a national religious television network after showing up at the American Music Awards dressed like a heavy metal rock singer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1994 | CONSTANCE SOMMER
Customers of Ventura's Avenue TV Cable will pay $2.75 more a month for basic cable service beginning Oct. 1, company officials said this week. Subscribers who are now charged $16 monthly for 22 channels will receive an October bill for $18.75, said Steve George, vice president of Avenue TV Cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1994 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Departing from the conservative fiscal strategy that made it the world's largest religious television programming service, Trinity Broadcasting Network has announced plans to create a 30-acre, $13-million gospel and country music entertainment complex outside Nashville. Paul Crouch, founder and president of the Tustin-based network, says Trinity will purchase Twitty City, owned by the family of the late country singer Conway Twitty.
NEWS
June 8, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jay Alan Sekulow, the attorney who won his fourth U.S. Supreme Court victory on free speech and religion Monday, owes much of his prominence to exposure on the nation's largest Christian broadcasting network, the Tustin-based empire of Paul Crouch Sr. Through his Trinity Broadcast Network and contributions totaling $3 million to nonprofit organizations controlled by Sekulow, Crouch has played a major role in boosting Sekulow's career as the best-known attorney for the Religious Right.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1993 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission, citing evidence that Trinity Broadcasting Network used a minority "front" to acquire television stations, on Tuesday ordered a hearing to decide whether to strip the Orange County-based religious network of its station in Miami. If the FCC finds at the July 8 hearing that Trinity acted improperly, it may also fine the 24-hour-a-day Christian programming service $250,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1993 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Easter sunrise at the Hollywood Bowl survived its 73rd year Sunday, but the rift between rival groups vying for control of the service showed no sign of abating. "After all we've been through in taking the service back on behalf of the people of Hollywood, this one was something special," said publicist Norma Foster, the event's producer. But the woman who lost control of the service this year because of her controversial association with a popular television ministry saw it differently.
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