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Trinity River

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Trinity River will soon be rushing again, when Bureau of Reclamation workers release more water from Lewiston Dam on Sunday. The releases are to comply with a judge's order for 40% of the water to stay in the river, compared with 30% last year. Years of water diversion to Central Valley farms and utilities have diminished the Trinity. The higher, faster flows caused by the releases could be bad for trout fishing because the fish can get disoriented and swim into areas they are not used to.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
November 29, 2009 | By Mike Hiserman
Texas Christian's 51-10 win over New Mexico capped the football program's first undefeated regular season since 1938, when it won its only national championship with Heisman Trophy winner Davey O'Brien at quarterback. It seems the city of Fort Worth is more than a tad excited about it. Mayor Mike Moncrief on Friday proclaimed part of the Trinity River, where it runs through the city's Trinity Park, "Horned Frog River." Visitors will be able to tell which part, too, since the water -- using an environmentally friendly process, of course -- has been dyed purple.
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NEWS
December 20, 2000 | From Associated Press
Four decades after the remote Trinity River was dammed and diverted to pour water into California's farm belt, Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt on Tuesday cut the flow to growers to keep more water in the north. In emotional ceremonies on the ancestral lands of the 4,000-member Hoopa tribe, Babbitt said his decision fulfilled a pledge he made in 1993 to the Hoopa and Yurok tribes, which have economic and cultural ties to the river and the salmon that swim in it. "This wasn't just a project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2009 | Julie Cart
A 20-year-old U.S. Forest Service firefighter died Tuesday after falling while rappelling from a helicopter during a training exercise near Willow Creek, in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest. The firefighter, who was not identified, fell 200 feet into the Trinity River during a required safety training exercise, according to Humboldt County Coroner Dave Parris. He said the accident appeared to be the result of a mistake on the part of the firefighter or the helicopter crew. "From the statements we have so far, it's definitely a safety oversight on behalf of the crew," Parris said.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing diminished supplies for power users and farmers, a giant water district has filed a lawsuit seeking to halt a recent decision by U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt to bolster flows to Northern California's once-roaring Trinity River. Lawyers for the Westlands Water District, which supplies water to more than half a million acres of some of the world's richest farmland, filed their complaint last Friday in U.S. District Court in Fresno.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal appellate court approved a congressional plan Tuesday to increase flows into the Trinity River to restore fish habitat, reducing water to California farmers and hydroelectric plants. Most of the water in the Trinity, which originates in Northern California's Trinity Alps and flows west into the Klamath River, has been diverted for decades to service a fast-growing state where much of the water is located far from where people live and farm.
OPINION
August 24, 2002
Broken promises were the hallmark of relations between the U.S. government and the Indian tribes of the West in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Then the issue was land. Now, with a small tribe in California's far north, it's water. As with many water issues, the issue of who's right is being tromped by whoever has the water.
SPORTS
November 29, 2009 | By Mike Hiserman
Texas Christian's 51-10 win over New Mexico capped the football program's first undefeated regular season since 1938, when it won its only national championship with Heisman Trophy winner Davey O'Brien at quarterback. It seems the city of Fort Worth is more than a tad excited about it. Mayor Mike Moncrief on Friday proclaimed part of the Trinity River, where it runs through the city's Trinity Park, "Horned Frog River." Visitors will be able to tell which part, too, since the water -- using an environmentally friendly process, of course -- has been dyed purple.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
They've clung stubbornly to this valley for 10,000 years. When the white man came, the Hoopa tribe endured waves of fortune seekers and government agents. As it always had, the band survived on its members' wits and on the bounty of the Trinity River. Now the tribe believes it is in the battle of its life, trying to save the river itself. Before dams and water diversions, the Trinity River roared through this remote reservation in a frothy torrent, noisy as a parade of locomotives.
NEWS
May 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Residents of low-lying areas along the Trinity River in southeastern Texas braced for the worst as a record 85,000 cubic feet of water per second was released from Lake Livingston to protect the dam there. The river's crest was expected to reach the dam today, and further releases from the reservoir could cause the worst flooding in 80 years.
NATIONAL
May 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A couple has been accused of opening fire and wounding four people, including a 7-year-old boy and a 5-year-old girl, who they mistakenly thought were trespassing on their property near Dayton. The victims, who were off-roading near a residential area about 40 miles northeast of Houston, were struck with shotgun pellets late Thursday after stopping their vehicles near the Trinity River so the children could go to the bathroom, said Liberty County Chief Deputy Ken DeFoor. Police said Sheila Muhs, 45, fired once with a 12-gauge shotgun, then handed it to her husband, Gale, also 45. DeFoor said Sheila Muhs called 911 and told the dispatcher, "They're out here tearing up the levee, so I shot them."
OPINION
July 6, 2008 | Marc B. Haefele, Marc B. Haefele is a commentator for KPCC-FM (89.3) and writes for Citybeat, Citywatch and Nomada magazine of Buenos Aires.
For more than a generation, great cities in the American West have sought to repossess, regain or even re-create the rivers that run through them. San Antonio vaunts its 60-year-old Riverwalk as Texas' foremost tourist attraction. Dallas takes pride in the Trinity River it has reclaimed as a chain of lakes and greenbelt. And Denver has its South Platte River Initiative. Los Angeles wants its river back too, and decades-long restoration efforts are underway. If and when a people-friendly Los Angeles River emerges from its concrete flood-control coffin, it would be our city's greatest work of collective imagination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2005 | Bettina Boxall, Times Staff Writer
A series of short siren blasts signaled a climactic moment in a decades-long battle over the Trinity River, which, like so many rivers in California, has lost much of its water, its fish and its freedom. As a gate lifted on the small concrete Lewiston Dam, about an hour's winding drive west of Redding, water spilled down an apron into the Trinity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2004 | From Associated Press
A federal appellate court approved a congressional plan Tuesday to increase flows into the Trinity River to restore fish habitat, reducing water to California farmers and hydroelectric plants. Most of the water in the Trinity, which originates in Northern California's Trinity Alps and flows west into the Klamath River, has been diverted for decades to service a fast-growing state where much of the water is located far from where people live and farm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A Central Valley water district is offering a deal that could end decades of wrangling over dwindling water flows that have undercut salmon runs on Northern California's Trinity River. The Westlands Water District has been fighting the federal government and Indian tribes for years over water it diverts from the river to irrigate crops more than 300 miles to the south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
They've clung stubbornly to this valley for 10,000 years. When the white man came, the Hoopa tribe endured waves of fortune seekers and government agents. As it always had, the band survived on its members' wits and on the bounty of the Trinity River. Now the tribe believes it is in the battle of its life, trying to save the river itself. Before dams and water diversions, the Trinity River roared through this remote reservation in a frothy torrent, noisy as a parade of locomotives.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Brazos and Trinity rivers continued to rise Tuesday, swamping homes and roads and forcing evacuations. At Liberty, about 50 miles northeast of Houston, the Trinity was at 29.02 feet Tuesday, five feet above flood stage. Emergency officials said there was water in at least 100 homes, and about 50 people were staying at a Red Cross shelter. Residents along the Trinity were threatened by additional releases from Lake Livingston Dam, about 50 miles to the north.
NEWS
May 24, 1990 | From United Press International
The Ouachita River raged downstream in Arkansas on Wednesday, and the Trinity River crested 6 feet above flood stage in southeast Texas as flooding continued to plague the region. The rain-engorged Ouachita, which flooded Arkadelphia earlier, was advancing on Camden, where the crest was expected to arrive today at 12 feet above flood stage, the National Weather Service said.
OPINION
August 24, 2002
Broken promises were the hallmark of relations between the U.S. government and the Indian tribes of the West in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Then the issue was land. Now, with a small tribe in California's far north, it's water. As with many water issues, the issue of who's right is being tromped by whoever has the water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Trinity River will soon be rushing again, when Bureau of Reclamation workers release more water from Lewiston Dam on Sunday. The releases are to comply with a judge's order for 40% of the water to stay in the river, compared with 30% last year. Years of water diversion to Central Valley farms and utilities have diminished the Trinity. The higher, faster flows caused by the releases could be bad for trout fishing because the fish can get disoriented and swim into areas they are not used to.
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