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BUSINESS
July 3, 1992
Walt Disney Co. owns the term Fantasyland, which means an Edmonton mall must rename its theme park, a judge ruled. The decision, handed down Tuesday in Edmonton Court of Queen's Bench, means the West Edmonton Mall faces a multimillion-dollar bill to wipe Fantasyland off its billboards, brochures, signs and letterheads. Disney, known for aggressively challenging unlicensed use of its characters and trademarks, had sued for $1 and a court injunction to stop the use of the term.
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BUSINESS
July 3, 1992
Walt Disney Co. owns the term Fantasyland, which means an Edmonton mall must rename its theme park, a judge ruled. The decision, handed down Tuesday in Edmonton Court of Queen's Bench, means the West Edmonton Mall faces a multimillion-dollar bill to wipe Fantasyland off its billboards, brochures, signs and letterheads. Disney, known for aggressively challenging unlicensed use of its characters and trademarks, had sued for $1 and a court injunction to stop the use of the term.
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BUSINESS
July 8, 1989 | KEVIN O'LEARY, Times Staff Writer
A Canadian company that owns one of the world's biggest malls is developing preliminary plans to build a giant shopping mall and amusement park in Riverside County south of Lake Elsinore, a county supervisor said Friday. The proposed "Mall of the World," with 2.7 million square feet of gross leaseable space, would be the largest in the state, surpassing Del Amo Fashion Plaza in Torrance and South Coast Plaza.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1989 | KEVIN O'LEARY, Times Staff Writer
A Canadian company that owns one of the world's biggest malls is developing preliminary plans to build a giant shopping mall and amusement park in Riverside County south of Lake Elsinore, a county supervisor said Friday. The proposed "Mall of the World," with 2.7 million square feet of gross leaseable space, would be the largest in the state, surpassing Del Amo Fashion Plaza in Torrance and South Coast Plaza.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | JEFF BRADLEY, Associated Press
When it's bedtime in your theme room at the Fantasyland Hotel, you switch off the traffic lights and climb into the back of a Ford pickup truck. Or you can hop into a gaslit Victorian coach-bed or watch a volcano erupt on the wall while dozing off in a Polynesian catamaran. The new $36-million hotel is another impossible dream realized by the four Ghermezian brothers, owners of West Edmonton Mall, the world's biggest and wildest indoor shopping complex.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1990 | From Times wire services
The developer of the world's biggest shopping center, Canada's West Edmonton Mall, plans to start a consulting venture in Japan following a relaxation of rules on opening large retail stores. Triple Five Corp. of Canada and Japan's Commerce System Corp. will set up a 50-50 venture in July called International Malls, a Commerce System spokesman said today. The consulting firm will offer developers expertise gained in the construction and operation of the West Edmonton Mall.
NEWS
January 10, 2000
Jacob Ghermezian, 97, patriarch of the Canadian development company that built the world's largest shopping mall, in Edmonton, Alberta. Ghermezian, originally from Azerbaijan, established a carpet export business in the Iranian capital of Tehran before immigrating to Montreal in the 1950s. He quickly formed a rug business called Ghermezian Bros., building it into a 16-store chain that operated mainly in the United States.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree: Where Alph, the sacred river, ran Through caverns measureless to man Down to a sunless sea. . . . -- Samuel Coleridge Xanadu this isn't. Nearly three-fourths of all Canadians live within 90 miles of the U.S. border. Of those who do not, some 785,000 live here in Edmonton, an improbably sited city on the wind-swept Alberta prairie, 54 degrees north latitude.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
The world's biggest pension fund said it plans to put the U.S.' biggest shopping mall, the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minn., up for sale. The 4.2-million-square-foot complex, which includes more than 520 stores, an indoor theme park and an aquarium, could fetch between $650 million and $700 million, according to people familiar with the situation.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1992 | From Associated Press
More steel than the Eiffel Tower. More than 2.5 million cubic feet of concrete. Rivaling the world's tallest office building in floor space. Welcome to Mall of America. With 400-plus stores, 14 movie theaters, seven restaurants and five nightclubs, it's soon to become the nation's largest shopping mall. A veritable $70-million amusement park. There's one big question: Will it succeed?
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | JEFF BRADLEY, Associated Press
When it's bedtime in your theme room at the Fantasyland Hotel, you switch off the traffic lights and climb into the back of a Ford pickup truck. Or you can hop into a gaslit Victorian coach-bed or watch a volcano erupt on the wall while dozing off in a Polynesian catamaran. The new $36-million hotel is another impossible dream realized by the four Ghermezian brothers, owners of West Edmonton Mall, the world's biggest and wildest indoor shopping complex.
BUSINESS
October 13, 1985 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer and EDMONTON, Alberta
From time immemorial, man has raised monuments--Greeks the Parthenon, Egyptians the pyramids. Here, it is the West Edmonton Mall. The mall, a glass-domed monument to consumerism, is said to be the largest shopping center on earth. Its developers call it the eighth wonder of the world. It is a world apart, a world with its own experiences, free of the mundane struggles with weather and boredom.
BUSINESS
July 24, 1989
After selling about $7 million in F-19 stealth fighter plane models, you'd think the Testor model kit company would be rushing to sell reproductions of the B-2 stealth bomber. But Testor has no plans to re-create America's most expensive and controversial warplane in plastic. "There has been some discussion, but we probably won't do it," said John Dewey, spokesman for the Rockford, Ill., company. Dewey said Testor is watching the controversy surrounding the $500-million bomber with interest.
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