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Trivial Pursuit

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NEWS
September 24, 1987 | JEFFREY S. KLEIN
Who owns the trivia in the game Trivial Pursuit? Probably no one, but certainly not Frank L. Worth, according to a decision by the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in a copyright-infringement case decided earlier this month. Worth sued the creators and distributors of the Genus, Baby Boomer and Silver Screen editions of the popular home game, claiming they infringed the copyright he held in Volumes 1 and 2 of "The Complete Unabridged Super Trivia Encyclopedia," which he authored.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Chris Haney, a former Canadian journalist whose fascination with entertaining, barely useful tidbits of information led him to co-create the bestselling board game Trivial Pursuit, died Monday in Toronto. He was 59. He had been in poor health the last two years with kidney and circulatory problems, said Scott Abbott, who created the game with Haney more than 30 years ago and watched it become a cultural phenomenon across North America and around the world. "I was the architect and Chris was the general contractor.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2010 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Chris Haney, a former Canadian journalist whose fascination with entertaining, barely useful tidbits of information led him to co-create the bestselling board game Trivial Pursuit, died Monday in Toronto. He was 59. He had been in poor health the last two years with kidney and circulatory problems, said Scott Abbott, who created the game with Haney more than 30 years ago and watched it become a cultural phenomenon across North America and around the world. "I was the architect and Chris was the general contractor.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2009 | Joe Flint
In a deal that will surely make activist groups froth and may have rivals looking over their shoulders, Discovery Communications Inc. and Hasbro Inc. are partnering on a new kids' cable channel aimed at the elusive 14-and-under demographic. Under the terms of the deal, Hasbro, maker of Trivial Pursuit, G.I. Joe, Transformers and Scrabble, will pay $300 million for a 50% stake in Discovery Kids Network, the cable programmer's children's channel, which is available in 60 million homes.
NEWS
January 10, 1985 | United Press International
Murderer Joseph Carl Shaw ordered pizza for his last meal today and played Trivial Pursuit games with family members a few feet from the electric chair which was being prepared for his Friday execution. "He is pretty much at peace with himself and is ready for whatever happens," attorney Stephen Bright said. "He is very calm and relaxed." Shaw, a former altar boy who confessed to the 1977 murders of two Columbia teen-agers, was to die at 5 a.m. Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Linda Pezzano, whose unconventional marketing strategy launched the board game phenomenon Trivial Pursuit, died Tuesday in New York City. Pezzano was 54 and died of cervical cancer. The record-breaking sales of Trivial Pursuit--it grossed $1.4 billion by selling 40 million games in 36 months--was a triumph for the word-of-mouth sales strategy engineered by Pezzano, whose marketing brainstorm is legendary in toy circles and changed the way board games are sold. A native of Schenectady, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1988 | ELIZABETH WHELAN, Elizabeth Whelan, a scientist, is executive director of the American Council on Science and Health in New York. and
This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Delaney Clause, one of the most costly, insidious and scientifically bereft pieces of legislation passed by Congress. The clause demands that the Food and Drug Administration ban from the food supply any chemical that has been shown to cause cancer in laboratory animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
In the annals of social interaction, Trivial Pursuit is a very big deal. Word and board games had existed before 1982, when the brain tickler in a box became widely available, and of course people had gathered together for an evening of conversation before then. But no board game created for adults had ever become such a phenomenal success, even among those who didn't play cards or chess and who thought children's games like Monopoly were insomnia cures.
BUSINESS
May 6, 1986 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Coleco Industries, the company that helped popularize computer games in 1982 with Donkey Kong and other electronic diversions, has agreed to purchase one of the nation's leading marketers of board games for $75 million. Coleco--which had net income of $82.9 million in 1985 on sales of $776 million in 1985--agreed to buy Selchow & Righter, best known for the marketing of popular and classic games such as Trivial Pursuit, Scrabble and Parcheesi.
BOOKS
October 18, 1987 | Allison Silver, S ilver is an articles editor in Opinion.
It's easy to be smug about yuppies, as Alan Saperstein proves with his new novel, "How Old Was Lolita?" After all, these are superficial people who spend their lives playing games, whether it's Botticelli during dinner or the sort of competition that develops as this group of friends vie to set up the best possible arrangements for a funeral. Nothing fazes them in their self-absorbed world, even suicide.
SPORTS
December 1, 2006 | Mike Penner, Times Staff Writer
Youth sports are out of control, Exhibit A: The Vancouver Whitecaps suspended their under-15 boys' soccer team indefinitely after two players and several spectators chased a referee off the field because he'd made a call they didn't like in a Super Y-League tournament game played in Tampa, Fla. The melee broke out after the Whitecaps, trailing Los Angeles FC, 1-0, in a championship semifinal, were awarded a penalty kick at the end of the game.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 2005 | Steve Harvey
On one freeway billboard, the promoters of Sunday's L.A. Marathon obviously wanted to discuss the race in terms that would be relevant to Angelenos. It says: "High speed chase through downtown L.A. Live at 7:30." Well, how many other areas have spawned a website -- www .pursuitwatch.com -- that enables you keep track of the latest cop chases? Speaking of excitement: Jean Meltzer of L.A.
HOME & GARDEN
January 6, 2005 | Paul Whitefield, Times Staff Writer
In simpler times, everyone had a card table. It had myriad uses: It became a bridge table when Bill and Edna came over on Wednesday nights, the kids' table at festive gatherings, the crafts table at scout meetings, and, on special occasions, the gift table. It also came in handy for jigsaw puzzles. People make millions playing poker now, and millions watch them on TV. We envy the sunglasses, those piles of chips -- and that cool poker table. You want one, and furniture makers are listening.
OPINION
July 16, 2003
Re "Connerly's Trivial Pursuit," editorial, July 14: The Times states that by wanting a colorblind government I am engaged in a "trivial pursuit." It accuses me of having an "obsession" with my own racial heritage, noting its mixture and saying "so what ... most African Americans have multiracial forebears." Is The Times so blind that it cannot see what is implicit in that statement? Like so many others who profess to be enlightened about "race," The Times unwittingly supports the infamous "one-drop" rule -- a remnant of slavery and Jim Crow.
OPINION
July 14, 2003
When Ward Connerly, California's self-designated racial policeman, gets mad, his anger cascades into voting booths across the country. Last month's Supreme Court decision in a University of Michigan case that allowed schools to consider race as one factor in admissions really ticked him off: An "aberration ... not consistent with where this country is or where it ought to be" -- that's how Connerly sees it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Mimi Avins, Times Staff Writer
In the annals of social interaction, Trivial Pursuit is a very big deal. Word and board games had existed before 1982, when the brain tickler in a box became widely available, and of course people had gathered together for an evening of conversation before then. But no board game created for adults had ever become such a phenomenal success, even among those who didn't play cards or chess and who thought children's games like Monopoly were insomnia cures.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2002 | Bob Baker, Times Staff Writer
We've heard it for decades: We're drowning in local television news shows that are obsessed with crime and celebrity, the visual and the visceral. When a Washington-based news-media think tank released its annual "grades" of local TV news in 17 cities earlier this month, it gave each of Southern California's three network affiliates low Cs for their 11 p.m. newscasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2001 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The return of series that had been in reruns all summer should be a good thing right now; much pleasure can be taken in the comfort of old friends. But what if something has changed dramatically during our time apart? Case in point: tonight's season-opening episode of "Will & Grace" (9 p.m. on NBC). Written and filmed before the events of Sept.
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