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Tropical Storm Emily

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August 3, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Bringing drenching rains, Tropical Storm Emily crossed the Caribbean on Wednesday, heading for a possible landfall near Florida. Meanwhile, other parts of the South and central United States continued to bake in record high temperatures. Emily, the fifth named storm of the season, was moving through the Caribbean at about 14 mph, the National Hurricane Center reported Wednesday. The storm was packing winds of better than 50 mph and could become a low-level hurricane as it moves over the weekend toward Florida.
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NATIONAL
August 3, 2011 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Bringing drenching rains, Tropical Storm Emily crossed the Caribbean on Wednesday, heading for a possible landfall near Florida. Meanwhile, other parts of the South and central United States continued to bake in record high temperatures. Emily, the fifth named storm of the season, was moving through the Caribbean at about 14 mph, the National Hurricane Center reported Wednesday. The storm was packing winds of better than 50 mph and could become a low-level hurricane as it moves over the weekend toward Florida.
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NATIONAL
August 2, 2011 | By Megan Garvey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Eugene, which is moving across the open Pacific off the coast of Baja California, has reached "major hurricane" status, according to an advisory issued late Tuesday by the National Weather Service. The storm is producing sustained winds of 115 mph but remains far from land and has generated no warnings or watches for coastal areas. Weather officials report that the hurricane will "remain no threat to land" over the next couple of days. It is considered to be a Category 3 hurricane, which is capable of causing widespread damage.
NATIONAL
August 2, 2011 | By Megan Garvey, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Eugene, which is moving across the open Pacific off the coast of Baja California, has reached "major hurricane" status, according to an advisory issued late Tuesday by the National Weather Service. The storm is producing sustained winds of 115 mph but remains far from land and has generated no warnings or watches for coastal areas. Weather officials report that the hurricane will "remain no threat to land" over the next couple of days. It is considered to be a Category 3 hurricane, which is capable of causing widespread damage.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The 1999 hurricane season was in full swing Tuesday, with three tropical storms close to hurricane strength swirling in the Atlantic region. Tropical storm Emily joined Dennis and Cindy, taking forecasters by surprise with her strength. "I don't understand what's happening out there, but things are popping," said Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
NEWS
September 22, 1987
Tropical Storm Emily became Hurricane Emily packing 75 m.p.h. winds in the Caribbean, and the National Hurricane Center in Miami extended a hurricane watch to the southern coast of Haiti. Emily was considered a minimal hurricane because its sustained winds had barely passed the 74 m.p.h. threshold. It didn't seem likely that the hurricane would hit the United States, said Noel Risnychok, a meteorologist at the hurricane center.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
The first hurricane of the 1993 Atlantic season burst to life Thursday hundreds of miles east of Florida, weather officials said. The transformation of Tropical Depression 5 into Tropical Storm Emily and then Hurricane Emily took only three hours and came two days after South Florida residents marked the first anniversary of Hurricane Andrew. Hurricane Emily was centered about 415 miles southeast of Bermuda. It had top sustained winds of 78 m.p.h. and was moving west at 4 m.p.h.
NATIONAL
August 5, 2011 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
Exceptionally warm ocean waters and favorable atmospheric conditions are expected to bring an above-average number of tropical storms and hurricanes to the Atlantic and Caribbean, national weather forecasters predicted Thursday. The forecast comes as Florida braces for the remnants of Tropical Storm Emily, which has pounded the Caribbean in recent days with rain and winds above 50 mph. The storm weakened considerably Thursday, but is expected to bring some rain and winds to Florida over the weekend.
NEWS
August 25, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
The 1999 hurricane season was in full swing Tuesday, with three tropical storms close to hurricane strength swirling in the Atlantic region. Tropical storm Emily joined Dennis and Cindy, taking forecasters by surprise with her strength. "I don't understand what's happening out there, but things are popping," said Jerry Jarrell, director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
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