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Truancy

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2002 | ANICA BUTLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Skipping school is at least as old as Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, speakers reminded the Ventura City Council last week. But the council remains poised to implement a daytime curfew today that it hopes will put an end to school-time surfing excursions. Even though truancy rates have been decreasing, youngsters still skip school, supporters of the curfew say. And some of those students become crime victims when they should be in class.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2002 | TIMOTHY HUGHES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state crime-fighting grant at the top of Santa Paula's wish list would pump nearly a million dollars over the next four years into programs targeting the farm town's toughest neighborhoods. Work is nearly complete on the application for the highly competitive California Gang, Crime and Violence Prevention Partnership grant that will be turned into the state attorney general's office July 26, said Mike Jump, a grant writer in the Ventura County district attorney's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 2002 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ventura County students who continually ditch class should be incarcerated and those at risk of becoming habitual truants should be put in a "boot-camp" style program to get them back on track, according to a grand jury report. Citing U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2002 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attendance counselor Stephan Blustajn is paying an afternoon visit to a modest apartment near downtown Los Angeles. Inside, a 15-year-old girl named Dora is on a couch, watching television. "Are you bored?" Blustajn asks as a Spanish version of "The People's Court" drones in the background. Dora nods yes. Blustajn is trying to coax Dora back to school, but it's a hard sell.
NEWS
March 24, 2002
Re "Learning Truancy's Lessons," Editorial, March 10: The community-based, nonprofit Orange County Youth & Family Services operates the Truancy Learning Center, where students and families in the Orange Unified School District receive crisis intervention, assessment, education, counseling and referrals. Strong enforcement is unnecessary when funding is available for school officials and centers that use preventive measures to provide counseling, mentoring of both parents and students, and education.
OPINION
March 10, 2002
Perhaps the only one who may dislike being made to sit in school more than a habitual truant is the truant's parent. But that's where one father recently found himself after a judge ordered him there. He should consider himself fortunate to have sat in his son's classroom that day. It could have been a jail cell. It's all part of the county crackdown that has put teeth in long-standing truancy laws, rarely enforced because of a lack of funds and personnel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
In the first prosecution under a new truancy program, a judge Wednesday placed a 17-year-old girl on probation after she admitted repeatedly skipping school. Orange County Superior Court Judge Robert Hutson ordered the Anaheim girl to meet regularly with a probation officer, who will make sure she is attending classes at Gilbert High School. If the girl misses school because of illness, she must provide her probation officer with a doctor's note, Deputy Dist. Atty. Danielle Augustin said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Three agencies in Ventura County with programs that aim to reduce student truancy have been awarded a total of $147,210 in federal funds, Dist. Atty. Michael D. Bradbury said Tuesday. The largest sum, $83,171, will go to Interface Children and Family Services, which offers support groups and parenting classes for students and parents in Santa Paula, Fillmore and Piru.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Fresno children who play hooky are going to have to pay the price in cash or community service. The City Council on Tuesday passed what some call a daytime curfew aimed at keeping children in school by penalizing truants. Supporters say it will reduce truancy and juvenile crime. Opponents say it will criminalize a social problem and could lead to racial profiling. Those who skip school twice face a $100 fine or up to 40 hours of community service.
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