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Truancy

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2004 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Hollywood High School students and their parents were summoned to a meeting on campus Wednesday night to learn about the consequences -- academic and legal -- of frequently missing school, part of an effort to reduce student absences that are costing the Los Angeles Unified School District millions of dollars. The students called to the meeting were among the nearly 40% at the school with 15 absences last year and 10 so far this year, some excused and others truancies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2004 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
The Orange County Grand Jury accused three school districts Thursday of violating state education code by failing to identify habitual truants and concluded that truancy was a rampant, countywide problem. One of the report's investigators, Alan Friedman, said some children missed 30 school days each year. The report quotes Huntington Beach Union High School District officials as viewing its truancies as "out of control."
NATIONAL
March 7, 2004 | P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writer
In an effort to curtail truancies and dropouts, Chicago public schools will require students who want to quit to sign a waiver that states that doing so will be hazardous to their futures. Parents must also sign the waiver, which warns that dropping out of school often leads to unemployment, jail and other troubles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2003 | From Times Staff Reports
Los Angeles City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo announced Thursday that his office would continue an anti-truancy, anti-gang program aimed at middle school students. Operation Bright Future teaches parents about their legal responsibility to send their children to school and warns that parents whose children are excessively absent could face misdemeanor charges. The attendance rate for students enrolled in the program increased by 3.4% last year, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2003 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Parents of habitually truant students were nabbed in a countywide sweep, authorities said. On Tuesday, Sacramento County law enforcement and school officials targeted chronic offenders who fail to send their children to school despite extensive help from officials. Twenty-one parents were arrested and charged with contributing to the delinquency of a minor -- a charge carrying a maximum penalty of one year in county jail and a fine of $2,500.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2002 | Massie Ritsch, Times Staff Writer
Staring down a courtroom full of truant teenagers, her badge pinned where everyone could see it, Ventura County prosecutor Wendy Macfarlane made it clear she won't tolerate ditching. "All of you are here today because there's an attendance problem," she said. But the deputy district attorney wasn't talking just to the shirking students. She also wanted the parents in the room to get the message. "We're equal-opportunity here; we can prosecute the parent and the child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 2002 | JENIFER RAGLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 11:30 a.m., and Santa Paula Police Officer Michelle Velasco stands at the door of the mobile home, knocking. She rings the doorbell. She knocks again. After about five minutes, a teenager saunters to the door. "Hi," the 34-year-old officer says. "Why aren't you in school?" The boy tells Velasco he was sick. He got food poisoning, and that's why he hasn't been to class in two weeks. It's a line she's heard before. "You look OK now," she says. "Why don't I give you a ride there?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2002 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Students call it "ditching." Authorities call it truancy, illegal and a pitfall to crime and poverty. Announcing a new program Wednesday to combat truancy in Los Angeles schools, City Atty. Rocky Delgadillo and leaders of the Los Angeles Unified School District warned parents who fail to send their children to school that they risk their children's futures.
WORLD
August 11, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
After decades of boasting the world's most studious youngsters, Japan's schools reported a record number of truants in the school year that ended March 31, a new survey has found. The Education Ministry said about 139,000 elementary and junior high school students did not attend classes for at least 30 consecutive days. That was a more than 3% increase from the 2000-01 academic year.
NEWS
August 7, 2002 | ANICA BUTLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Beginning Sept. 5, it will be illegal for Ventura youths to be on the streets between 8 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. on school days. Despite protests from parents and concerns raised by one official over possible lawsuits, a split City Council on Monday adopted a daytime curfew called the Safe Students Ordinance. "I am absolutely confident that this ordinance will prove to be an effective tool for our officers" to combat truancy, Police Chief Mike Tracy told the council.
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