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Trucking Industry Southern California

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NEWS
March 26, 1987
A bill to overhaul the South Coast Air Quality Management District board and give it broad new authority to clean up the air--including power to ban big trucks from freeways during rush hours--ran into a wall of opposition during its first hearing in the state Senate. An industry group, Los Angeles city and county officials, and Southern California Edison Co. oppose the measure. It is backed by environmental groups.
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NEWS
January 5, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big rig lumbering at daybreak out of a San Bernardino truck yard with a million-dollar load of cigarettes is swarmed by at least three armed bandits. They jump on the running boards, smash the windows and douse the driver's face with pepper spray. Within seconds, they handcuff the driver and his passenger, then rumble down the road.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 1994 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evidence continues to mount that Southern California took a hefty economic wallop from the Northridge earthquake that will be felt for months to come. The local tourism industry will take an estimated $308-million hit because of the quake. That translates into the temporary loss of 9,240 jobs in the next few months, the Los Angeles Convention & Visitors Bureau projected Tuesday in the first detailed report on the subject. A rebound is expected by summer, however.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A big rig pulls out of a central warehouse in Irwindale, carrying a load destined for an Ace Hardware store. It looks like an ordinary truck. But a quick inspection of the exhaust pipe shows how different it really is. No black puffs of smoke, no smelly fumes. Instead of diesel, it burns liquefied natural gas. Built for Ace Hardware two years ago, it was the first heavy-duty natural-gas truck in California, and among the first in the nation.
NEWS
January 5, 2002 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A big rig lumbering at daybreak out of a San Bernardino truck yard with a million-dollar load of cigarettes is swarmed by at least three armed bandits. They jump on the running boards, smash the windows and douse the driver's face with pepper spray. Within seconds, they handcuff the driver and his passenger, then rumble down the road.
NEWS
May 31, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A big rig pulls out of a central warehouse in Irwindale, carrying a load destined for an Ace Hardware store. It looks like an ordinary truck. But a quick inspection of the exhaust pipe shows how different it really is. No black puffs of smoke, no smelly fumes. Instead of diesel, it burns liquefied natural gas. Built for Ace Hardware two years ago, it was the first heavy-duty natural-gas truck in California, and among the first in the nation.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California industries on Monday painted a grim picture of what would happen under the Clinton Administration's far-reaching plan to clean up the Los Angeles region's smog, saying it would force airlines, truckers, railroads and ships to severely reduce transport of cargo and passengers. The assessment came as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kicked off a week of hearings to gauge reaction to its sweeping anti-smog strategy. The proposal marks the first time the federal government has stepped into the decades-long fray over how to clean up the region's air pollution.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
California industries on Monday painted a grim picture of what would happen under the Clinton Administration's far-reaching plan to clean up the Los Angeles region's smog, saying it would force airlines, truckers, railroads and ships to severely reduce transport of cargo and passengers. The assessment came as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kicked off a week of hearings to gauge reaction to its sweeping anti-smog strategy. The proposal marks the first time the federal government has stepped into the decades-long fray over how to clean up the region's air pollution.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Evidence continues to mount that Southern California took a hefty economic wallop from the Northridge earthquake that will be felt for months to come. The local tourism industry will take an estimated $308-million hit because of the quake. That translates into the temporary loss of 9,240 jobs in the next few months, the Los Angeles Convention & Visitors Bureau projected Tuesday in the first detailed report on the subject. A rebound is expected by summer, however.
NEWS
March 26, 1987
A bill to overhaul the South Coast Air Quality Management District board and give it broad new authority to clean up the air--including power to ban big trucks from freeways during rush hours--ran into a wall of opposition during its first hearing in the state Senate. An industry group, Los Angeles city and county officials, and Southern California Edison Co. oppose the measure. It is backed by environmental groups.
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