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Truffles

FOOD
November 24, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY
The famous truffles of gastronomy are the black truffle of Perigord and the white truffle of Piedmont. But there are other underground fungi that count as truffles too, even though they don't grow in France or Italy or even belong to exactly the same genus. American foodies have certainly heard of the Oregon black truffle. It turns out to have a Mediterranean cousin, the Moroccan white truffle (Terfezia boudieri), also known by its Berber name, terfas.
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NEWS
January 19, 1992
Kuwaitis are flocking to buy desert truffles imported from Saudi Arabia after Gulf War oil pollution wiped out the popular winter delicacy in the northern Gulf emirate. Kuwait's Al Rai al Aam newspaper carried a front-page article welcoming the arrival of the truffle, which is selling at $35 a pound in the marketplace. Gulf Arab families enjoy driving into the desert to picnic, and look for the truffle, which grows half-buried in the ground just after seasonal winter rains.
FOOD
January 9, 1997 | ANNE WILLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Willan's most recent cookbook is "In and Out of the Kitchen in 15 Minutes or Less" (Rizzoli, 1995)
"Allez, allez, keep looking!" Two fluffy Pyrenean mountain dogs roam and sniff the oak tree roots under my skeptical eye. Suddenly one starts to scratch. Quick as a flash, their master, Michel Jalade, darts forward and takes over the digging. Hollowing the ground with his hunting knife, he uncovers a dark, cindery ball the size of a large walnut. The unmistakable, pungent aroma of fresh truffle fills the air. This is no ordinary fresh truffle.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1986 | SHERRY VIRBILA
I have eaten what I'm sure must be more than my share of good things in this world. But this fall in Piemonte, the wine region southwest of Milan as famous for its tartufi as for its big, beautiful reds, I thought I just might have gone too far. There was a period when I ate white truffles-- tuber magnatum , the glory of Alba--two times a day for five days straight. I got my first taste at Felicin, a country restaurant in Monforte d'Alba.
FOOD
March 27, 2002 | Donna Deane
This affordable earthy-flavored olive oil is infused with Italian black winter truffles. Drizzle over goat cheese, pastas or salads, dip bread in it or use it in salad dressings. Black truffle oil, 8.5-ounce bottle, $8.99 from Trader Joe's stores *. Silver Cheese Tray A trivet and cheese tray with a contemporary feel are new to Christofle's "Metropolis" collection. Both are made of silver with woven nickel in a basketwork pattern, and neither needs polishing. The cheese tray has a glass insert.
FOOD
January 29, 2003
Truffle dinners, 6 to 10 p.m., Wednesday through Friday, Patina, 5955 Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. Call (323) 467-1108 for reservations. Five-course dinner, $89; six-course dinner, $99.
NEWS
February 6, 1992 | BEVERLY BUSH SMITH, Beverly Bush Smith is a free-lance writer who regularly covers restaurant news for The Times Orange County Edition. and
Learn from a master chocolate truffle-maker how to create your very own confections to give to your valentine. Today, from 10 a.m. to noon, Russell Armstrong, past winner of Le Meridien's Truffle of the Year contest, will demonstrate three recipes at a free seminar at his Trees Restaurant in Corona del Mar.
FOOD
February 12, 2003 | Donna Deane
This artsy puffed heart is actually a chocolate box filled with an assortment of Belgian chocolate truffles. The truffles have centers made from cream, chocolate and flavorings. Joseph Schmidt chocolate heart and truffles, $17.99, from Say Cheese, 2800 Hyperion Ave., Los Angeles; (323) 665-0545.
FOOD
January 9, 1997 | SONNI EFRON
In Japan, where truffle-eating is a newly acquired taste, plenty of people are willing to pay the price for fresh truffles. Frank Van Goethem of French F&B Japan Inc., a truffle importer, is confident that there will always be a market for French truffles, despite the possibility of laboratory-grown truffles in the not-too-distant future. "If they have the same quality as nature--and that's a huge 'if'--it will just give more people a chance to eat them," Van Goethem says.
FOOD
January 14, 1988 | DANIEL P. PUZO
The wild mushroom poisonings last week in Northern California underscore the need for exercising extreme caution while harvesting fungi. Although no truffle species is believed to be toxic, care should still be taken before consuming any of the underground bulbs, according to James M. Trappe, professor of botany at Oregon State University. "Just like any other kind of food, truffles can affect people adversely and there is no way to predict this for any individual," Trappe said.
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