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Truffles

FOOD
January 14, 1988 | JOAN DRAKE, Times Staff Writer
Question: An Italian cooking expert I'm not, so when it comes time to top the various pasta dishes I make I'm at a loss. Could you please explain the differences between the sauces used in Italian cooking? For instance, what exactly are the differences between marinara, pesto and regular tomato sauce? Answer: The following is a partial list of pasta sauces excerpted and adapted from "A Pocket Guide to Italian Food and Wine" (A Fireside Book--Simon & Schuster: 1986, $5.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fashion news in fish bait this season is color. Living, wiggling color. When it comes to worms, brown is out. Day-Glo chartreuse, red and blue are in. Designer squirmers, created in Canada, made their debut in Ventura County last week. Anglers have tried them at Lake Piru and Lake Casitas, and although fish in Lake Piru don't seem impressed, some bait shops on the road to Lake Casitas are doing a brisk business.
FOOD
February 6, 2002 | JILL HUNTING, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year, skip the master gardening class about how to keep whiteflies out of your orange trees. Forget the annual pilgrimage to the nursery for zucchini starts. Plant your own truffle trees and grow something your friends will actually want. That's what I've done, with the help of a truffle grower, Mother Nature and all the patience I can muster. The most prized truffle varieties are the white truffle of Alba, Italy (Tuber magnatum pico), and the Perigord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum).
NEWS
November 28, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Fresh winter truffles are in season, and if you've managed to score one of the world's more expensive foods, odds are you can't wait to showcase it over something special. There's no better way to show off that pricey fungus than with an official truffle slicer (also known as a truffle shaver). A flat, smooth -- and often stylishly sleek -- plane is fitted with an adjustable blade, allowing you to shave your fragrant truffles into paper-thin slices for a most luxurious garnish. Prices vary by make and model, but a basic truffle slicer should run you no more than $25. When truffles are out of season, use it to shave chocolate (an equally luxurious garnish, in my humble opinion)
NEWS
September 6, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
If truffles figure in your dreams, tickets just went on sale for the ninth Oregon Truffle Festival . Truffles? Oregon? Well, yes, our northern cousin is actually producing some quite respectable examples. And if you buy your tickets sometime this month, you can take advantage of early-bird pricing.  The theme this year is “Foraged Foods and Fine Fermentations.” Special guests are to be authors Karen Page and Andrew Dornenburg, who practically wrote the book on matching wine with food ("What to Drink with What You Eat.”)
FOOD
January 9, 1997 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Truffles in a test tube? Sacre bleu! In yet another cold-blooded assault by modern science on one of nature's most charming and best-guarded secrets, Japanese researchers claim they have succeeded in growing a batch of white truffles in a laboratory and expect to produce a test-tube black truffle shortly.
FOOD
January 9, 1997 | ANNE WILLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Willan's most recent cookbook is "In and Out of the Kitchen in 15 Minutes or Less" (Rizzoli, 1995)
"Allez, allez, keep looking!" Two fluffy Pyrenean mountain dogs roam and sniff the oak tree roots under my skeptical eye. Suddenly one starts to scratch. Quick as a flash, their master, Michel Jalade, darts forward and takes over the digging. Hollowing the ground with his hunting knife, he uncovers a dark, cindery ball the size of a large walnut. The unmistakable, pungent aroma of fresh truffle fills the air. This is no ordinary fresh truffle.
NEWS
January 19, 1992
Kuwaitis are flocking to buy desert truffles imported from Saudi Arabia after Gulf War oil pollution wiped out the popular winter delicacy in the northern Gulf emirate. Kuwait's Al Rai al Aam newspaper carried a front-page article welcoming the arrival of the truffle, which is selling at $35 a pound in the marketplace. Gulf Arab families enjoy driving into the desert to picnic, and look for the truffle, which grows half-buried in the ground just after seasonal winter rains.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 1986 | SHERRY VIRBILA
I have eaten what I'm sure must be more than my share of good things in this world. But this fall in Piemonte, the wine region southwest of Milan as famous for its tartufi as for its big, beautiful reds, I thought I just might have gone too far. There was a period when I ate white truffles-- tuber magnatum , the glory of Alba--two times a day for five days straight. I got my first taste at Felicin, a country restaurant in Monforte d'Alba.
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