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Tuberculosis

NEWS
June 11, 1998 | From Associated Press
Scientists have pulled off the equivalent of stealing an enemy fort's blueprints: They've deciphered all the genetic material of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. That should help researchers develop new drugs and vaccines by exposing potential targets within the germ. The accomplishment is reported in today's issue of the journal Nature by scientists in the United States, England, France and Denmark. The scientists found about 4,000 genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN
A security guard at MainPlace mall in Santa Ana was diagnosed with tuberculosis and his family and closest co-workers are being screened for the disease, county health officials said Thursday. Sandy Omilianowski, a supervising public health nurse for the County Health Care Agency, said the guard is receiving medical attention from the county after being released from a hospital. "We will keep him off work until he is no longer contagious," she said, noting that the patient is taking antibiotics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1994 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The growing number of tuberculosis cases in Orange County may cause state funding for TB programs here to double this year, health officials said Thursday. The state Department of Health Services has already offered the Orange County Health Care Agency an additional $150,000, and may contribute another $275,000 within three weeks, state health officials said. If approved, the cash infusions would increase state contributions to the county agency's TB programs to about $905,000.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuberculosis has become the world's deadliest infectious disease, and the toll could soon rise even more dramatically if controls are not initiated quickly, the World Health Organization said Monday. The U.N. agency, in its first comprehensive look at global tuberculosis in a decade, said the disease kills nearly 3 million people a year, most of them between the ages of 15 and 59, "the segment of the population that is economically most productive."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2001 | JASON SONG
The rare black rhinoceros that died earlier this month at the Los Angeles Zoo may have had tuberculosis, officials said Friday. Tests conducted after the 24-year-old female, known as Sweet Pea, was euthanized Jan. 12 showed signs of the bacterial disease. Officials are unsure what type of tuberculosis--human, bovine, or another variety--the animal had. Only human and bovine forms of the disease pose a risk to humans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1990 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Public health officials say a sizable refugee community and a growing number of people infected with the AIDS virus have caused tuberculosis cases in Long Beach to more than double, prompting a request for emergency funds to hold off an epidemic. Reported cases shot from 59 in 1988 to 128 in 1989, leaving Long Beach with one of the highest tuberculosis rates in the nation, according to a report filed by Dr. Marion Johnson, the city's health officer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
Sir John Crofton, a physician who is credited with saving millions of lives by pioneering the use of cocktails of antibiotics to treat tuberculosis -- a concept that has subsequently been applied to treating a variety of other diseases, particularly cancer and AIDS -- died Nov. 3 at his home in Edinburgh, Scotland. He was 97. A specialist in diseases of the lungs, Crofton later turned his attention to battling smoking at home in Scotland and around the world, co-founding ASH-UK (Action on Smoking and Health)
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | From Reuters
U.S. researchers said Thursday that they had discovered how the tuberculosis bacterium and its cousin leprosy invade cells, and said this could open new avenues to treating the two ancient diseases. The bacteria hijack one component of the immune system and use it like a Trojan horse to sneak into immune cells known as macrophages, which they then destroy, the researchers reported in the journal Science.
SCIENCE
March 19, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The tuberculosis infection rate in the United States fell to a record low last year -- the lowest since reporting began 52 years ago -- but the relatively small decline raised fears that the nation was falling behind in its battle to eliminate the disease. A total of 14,511 active TB infections, or 4.9 cases per 100,000 people, were reported to U.S. authorities in 2004, according to data published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
April 25, 1997 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles County coroner's office is battling a long-standing and "serious" tuberculosis contamination problem that has infected at least seven employees, two of them with full-blown cases of the potentially deadly disease. The contamination, which originated in the autopsy areas and was spread because of inadequate venting systems and other problems, has forced the department to keep most people off that entire floor of its headquarters near County-USC Medical Center.
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