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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Nothing summed up the tumult and chaos of the inaugural YouTube Music Awards like webcast director Spike Jonze's final words to host Jason Schwartzman after 88 minutes of unscripted freakiness. "I think we're done," said an exhausted-looking Jonze, having just shimmied out of the strange white protective spacesuit-looking thing he was wearing, likely to protect himself from the chalk and fairy dust that was unleashed during singer M.I.A's performance. Schwartzman too deemed that an appropriate farewell for the night, and he repeated the phrase.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The inaugural YouTube Music Awards kicked off Sunday night with a live music video of the song “Afterlife” by Arcade Fire directed by Spike Jonze and starring Greta Gerwig. Gerwig danced with the same awkward Turrets style that was so endearing in "Francis Hah. " She grooved through a fake kitchen and into some fake snowy woods. She danced right up to Arcade Fire, which was performing on a stage at Pier 36 in New York City where the show was being shot. A bunch of kids joined her. A little more than 155,000 viewers watched the stream.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Naughty Nurse has some competition this Halloween. The YouTube video "The Fox (What Does the Fox Say?)" from the Norwegian comedic duo Ylvis has gone from viral video to cultural phenom, ranking among this year's most popular Halloween costumes, according to one online retailer. "The fox sold out almost immediately," said Marlon Heimerl, a spokesman for HalloweenCostumes.com in North Mankato, Minn. "Normally, that's not a huge seller. " PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV Halloween costumes often reflect what's happening in the zeitgeist.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By August Brown
YouTube has long been the de facto streaming service for music fans looking to hear a song on a moment's notice. But now the video site looks to be getting into the music-streaming game more officially. According to many reports, including Billboard and Company Town , the Google-owned site looks to debut the new paid service, which will follow Spotify's general model, before 2014 and potentially as soon as next month. The service would be geared toward mobile users and allow them to skip the advertising that accompanies most YouTube music clips.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
YouTube is poised to launch a subscription music service as soon as December, positioning it to compete with Spotify, Rdio and other digital offerings, according to people familiar with the matter. The Internet's dominant online video already is the most popular on-demand music offering in the world.  YouTube even has surpassed radio as the leading way teens and young adults listen to songs.  A subscription service would seek to build YouTube's strength in digital music.  YouTube users already can watch an unlimited number of music videos through an application on their mobile devices, as well as through a browser on their computers.  ON LOCATION: Where the cameras roll The subscription service would offer additional features, such as a commercial-free experience and the freedom to store music on a mobile device to listen when not connected to the Internet, according to people with knowledge of the matter who were not authorized to speak publicly.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By August Brown
Flying Lotus and Odd Future's Tyler, the Creator seem like artists who could most benefit from an alternative, online-centric music video awards show. Each indie act is known for visually striking clips and an outsider aesthetic that riffs on a universe of musical and pop cultural references. So maybe fans should take their criticism of the YouTube Music Awards seriously. Each act lambasted the new ceremony  - at which Tyler is expected to perform on Nov. 3 - as essentially an extension of the same mindless top-40 shenanigans as the VMAs (via Spin ; note, language advisory)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2013 | By Joe Serna
A malfunctioning firework caused a dramatic Fourth of July pyrotechnic disaster in Simi Valley that injured dozens of people, fire officials concluded in a report released Thursday. A 5-inch-wide firework shell failed to leave its mortar tube and exploded inside, sparking a chain reaction that knocked down the display and sent debris and firework projectiles flying toward about 10,000 spectators watching hundreds of feet away. The incident was investigated by Cal/OSHA, CalFire and the Ventura County Fire Department.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
To promote its new song from platinum-selling country music artist Hunter Hayes and Grammy winner Jason Mraz on Tuesday, Warner Music Group didn't book its stars on "Good Morning America" or "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon. " It made a video for YouTube. YouTube has elbowed out radio, MTV, Yahoo and Myspace as the leading way to reach young music listeners, and some of its personalities have emerged as tastemakers, serving much the same role as KROQ-FM's Kevin and Bean have. "For teens through age 24, YouTube is where people listen to the most music," said David Bakula, a senior vice president at audience measurement firm Nielsen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
A former West Hollywood real estate executive wanted for suspected fraud was arrested and charged after he was seen on a YouTube video promoting a restaurant he owned in Mexico, authorities said Thursday night. Alejandro "Alex" Martinez, 44, was the president of West Hollywood escrow firm and allegedly stole $1.3 million from the company's trust account, according to authorities. The victims included newly married couples and military personnel stationed overseas, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said.
OPINION
October 10, 2013 | Meghan Daum
It's been 30 years since the release of "The Big Chill," the ensemble drama about baby boomers pining for their lost youth while sprawled out on the floor of a vacation house and playing a lot of Motown music. If this reference eludes you, it's safe to say that you can consider yourself still young. If you remember this movie at all - especially if you remember the hype around its status as a cultural touchstone - I'm afraid you're tilting ever so slightly (or falling at a 90-degree angle)
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