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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
A tugboat began taking on water in the Catalina Channel several miles off San Pedro on Sunday, but lifeguard divers and crewmen managed to repair the 100-foot vessel and kept it afloat. The six crewmen aboard the Pelican Magic were heading toward a berth Sunday night at the Southwest Marine Shipyard on Terminal Island, moving under their own power, said county lifeguard Lt. Dave Story. Story said a distress call from the Florida-registered boat came at 4:05 p.m. By 5:30 p.m.
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NATIONAL
February 14, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
MOBILE, Ala. -- A Carnival cruise ship being towed to port in Mobile on Thursday has been delayed several hours -- first when some towing equipment broke and again when a tow line snapped -- but was still expected to arrive late Thursday night, a Carnival spokesman said. Still, the arrival could drag into early Friday morning, authorities concede. And no matter when the ship makes land, it will still take four to five hours for thousands of passengers and crew members to disembark.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
With its powerful diesel engines gently rumbling, Capt. Christi Thomas nudged the tugboat Spartan against the huge ship towering over her and shouted to the tug's deckhands to make fast to the Korean vessel. The Auto Champ--a 650-foot car carrier tied up in Los Angeles Harbor--had unloaded hundreds of Asian-built Chevrolets and Fords at Terminal Island and was ready to sail, but needed help getting under way.
WORLD
April 6, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
Strong currents Monday battered a stranded coal carrier that slammed into a stretch of Australia's Great Barrier Reef over the weekend, raising fears that more oil from the stricken ship would leak into the pristine ocean habitat. Officials sent a second tugboat to help keep the Chinese-registered Shen Neng 1 from grinding against the reef and potentially releasing more oil or even breaking apart. Meanwhile, workers used a floating boom to contain fuel that has leaked from the vessel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor tensions flared in the county's busy ports Wednesday as union representatives for the majority of tugboat crews charged that one of the largest providers of tug service in the harbor is trying to eliminate their bargaining power amid negotiations. The Inlandboatmen's Union of the Pacific, which represents about 250 tugboat personnel in the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles, has filed an unfair labor practices complaint with federal authorities against Gulf Caribe Maritime Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988
In a corner of Los Angeles Harbor, there is a floating graveyard of old tugboats, barges and other vessels. It's the Mole, a ship repair site once operated by the Navy. In the Mole, which is next to Terminal Island in San Pedro, an assortment of out-of-service ships rise up out of the water at crazy angles, rusting in the salty air. Some are barely afloat. Some are waiting for better days. The area is leased by a salvage and repair company that refurbishes some ships there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | CARRI KARUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's 5:45 a.m. as Capt. David Brusco maneuvers his tugboat through the fog toward a cargo ship waiting about two miles outside the Port of Hueneme. It's a good time of day to tow a ship into harbor. The winds haven't picked up yet, and the sea is calm. But the life of a tugboat operator can be anything but calm. The tugboat captains and deckhands at the port often battle high winds and towering waves to bring in the massive ships that make this harbor tick.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 1992 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Li'l Toot it's not. A full 105 feet in length, with twin V-12 diesel engines generating a total of 3,500 horsepower, the Point Vicente is a massive piece of machinery. To the uninitiated, the Point Vicente is a tugboat, but the men who run the 150-ton vessel prefer the term towboat. Its job is to push, pull, nudge and tend Gargantuan ships and barges as they maneuver through the maze of anchorages, channels, turning basins and docking areas in Long Angeles and Long Beach harbors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1993 | GORDON DILLOW
After swinging at anchor for more than three months in Los Angeles Harbor, two-thirds of the crew of the disabled Russian tugboat Gigant finally left for home this week, leaving a skeleton crew to watch over the ship as it undergoes repairs in Long Beach. The sixteen departing Russian sailors, including two female crew members, boarded an Air France flight from Los Angeles International Airport on Thursday night, bound for the Russian city of St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Navy submarine that accidentally sank a tugboat just outside Los Angeles Harbor last spring probably would have avoided the disaster--in which the tug's pilot was killed--had the crew used its "active" sonar before surfacing, a spokesman for the National Transportation Safety Board said Wednesday.
WORLD
April 12, 2009 | Robyn Dixon
The first slivers of information about crew members' dramatic battle to regain control of their U.S.-flagged ship from Somali pirates emerged Saturday night as the Maersk Alabama finally docked in this Kenyan port. From the ship's deck, exhausted crewmen shouted about heroism, and one pumped his fist in the air in jubilation as they approached the dock in the darkness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2009 | Susannah Rosenblatt
The Joedy had seen better days. The stout little tugboat leaked oil and took on water. It was missing a fire extinguisher. And its captain didn't have the proper license. But the real problem, the Coast Guard said, was that Joedy kept smashing into things in Newport Bay. Like the bridge that spans the harbor entrance and the bay-front fish market that sells fresh lobster. One whack after another. Authorities tallied four crashes in five weeks.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2008 | Ronald D. White, White is a Times staff writer.
For all of its 21st-century advancements, the shipping industry drags a lot of old technology around. Giant vessels are so sophisticated these days that they require only a handful of crew members. But the ships still burn a thick, dirty sludge called bunker fuel while at sea and slurp diesel to keep the lights and air conditioning running while in port. Inefficient yard tractors and cranes guzzle fuel and spew exhaust as they stack containers.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Newly released radio transmissions during a collision on the Mississippi River indicate a tugboat involved in a wreck with a tanker was repeatedly warned that the massive vessel was headed toward it but did not respond. The Coast Guard released results of its preliminary investigation and the audio recordings. In the radio chatter just before the July 24 collision, the pilot of the tanker audibly becomes increasingly distressed as the ship heads toward the tugboat, which was pushing a barge.
BUSINESS
June 18, 2007 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
On the last morning of her life, 26-year-old Piper Inness Cameron was doing exactly what she had always wanted to do. She was working on the deck of a tugboat and counting the days until she, like her father, would be piloting one. There were 41 to go. Then, at 11 a.m. Feb. 20 while moving through Santa Monica Bay about two miles off Marina del Rey, something went wrong. A line linking the tug and the barge it was towing suddenly struck Cameron and slammed her into a railing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 26-year-old tugboat worker was killed off Marina del Rey on Tuesday when a tow line attached to a barge snapped, hitting her and breaking her neck. A 36-year-old man was injured when he tried to aid his co-worker. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Deputy Oscar Butao said the woman was thrown against the railing of the tug after the tow cable hit her. The cable apparently snapped when it was pulled taut by a sea swell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Dan Rodriguez, the sea was a fabulous escape. "The ocean is different," he says. "You go out there, you were always breathing that sea breeze. Things are clearer. You could see the stars at night, different cloud formations, the wildlife, herds of sea lions. It's a different world." It's a world, however, that is now shut off to Rodriguez.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | Associated Press
A tugboat collided with a 38,000-ton Navy oiler Thursday as the vessel set out for Europe, officials said. There were no reports of injuries or spilled oil, but the collision left a 3-by-5-foot hole in the oiler's hull about eight feet above the waterline.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2006 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
To the casual observer, a disaster is about to occur at the Port of Long Beach. The South Korean containership Pohang Senator, more than two football fields long and heavy with retail goods from Asia, is nearing its parallel parking space at the port. But the Hanjin Shipping Co. vessel is moving too fast, its bow is pointed in the wrong direction and it is closing on the rocks at the base of its pier.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
A tugboat and three barges sank Sunday after being swept over a dam spillway on the Ohio River by currents made stronger by heavy rains, killing three crew members. One person was missing and believed to be aboard the sunken boat. Three people were rescued by crews of other tugs and taken to a hospital. Fire crews arriving on the scene determined the swift water was too dangerous to enter, said Chuck Ward, assistant fire chief in Industry.
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