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Tulare County Ca Agriculture

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NEWS
December 30, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of the 400 people who showed up each day last spring for family food boxes at the Lindsay-Strathmore Coordinating Council, the numbers have dwindled to 137 or 90--even 50 on a really good day. "Things are getting better," says Paulina Galvez, who works for the council. "A lot of families might still need the help, but as soon as they start work, they're so happy, they stop coming. Sometimes they even come in and tell us they won't be coming anymore." On Dec.
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NEWS
December 30, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Instead of the 400 people who showed up each day last spring for family food boxes at the Lindsay-Strathmore Coordinating Council, the numbers have dwindled to 137 or 90--even 50 on a really good day. "Things are getting better," says Paulina Galvez, who works for the council. "A lot of families might still need the help, but as soon as they start work, they're so happy, they stop coming. Sometimes they even come in and tell us they won't be coming anymore." On Dec.
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NEWS
March 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Pete Wilson will visit an unemployed orange picker and a food bank in Visalia today to underline the plight of those left destitute by the pre-Christmas freeze. Wilson is scheduled to visit the home of Concepcion Meza, who has been struggling to find enough food for his wife and 10 children. Meza, who has picked oranges since coming to the United States 18 years ago, has been out of work since December, when a bitter freeze wiped out this season's orange crop.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On an early March afternoon in Woodlake, Francisco and Maria Trinidad Rodriguez sit in their carefully furnished living room and recall what brought them here 18 years ago from Zacatecas. Before they ever planned to leave Mexico, Francisco says, they had heard about the gold in the trees. Enough gold for the Rodriguezes, and many others, to buy into the American Dream.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
Tulare County Agricultural Commissioner Clyde Churchill said he expects a good turnout Wednesday when local farmers are being asked to turn in outdated, banned and otherwise unusable chemicals for disposal at a landfill near Visalia. Last week, more than 4,600 gallons of liquid chemicals were brought in during a similar program in nearby Kings County.
NEWS
January 4, 1989
Tulare County supervisors voted to restrict all business travel by county employees to San Francisco in reaction to that city's support of the United Farm Workers table grape boycott. "Don't buy our grapes; we won't patronize your town," was the message contained in the supervisors' resolution, drafted by the Tulare County Farm Bureau. The resolution also urges the County Supervisors Assn. of California not to hold meetings in San Francisco.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a slow warming trend took hold across California, agricultural inspectors spent Monday in citrus groves, vegetable fields and packing houses trying to define the dimensions of the devastation that struck the state's frost-bitten agricultural industry over the weekend. Most of what they discovered was not encouraging.
NEWS
March 31, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On an early March afternoon in Woodlake, Francisco and Maria Trinidad Rodriguez sit in their carefully furnished living room and recall what brought them here 18 years ago from Zacatecas. Before they ever planned to leave Mexico, Francisco says, they had heard about the gold in the trees. Enough gold for the Rodriguezes, and many others, to buy into the American Dream.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Bill VanderPoel aided the cow in delivery of her newborn calf by gently pulling and wiggling the baby by her front legs from her mother's body. It was a special moment for the 6-foot-8, 21-year-old farmer. Two weeks ago, he moved his 800 cows from Southern California to his new 160-acre farm. "It's a female. That's always a plus for a milking operation," said VanderPoel, his face stretched in a wide grin. The calf was the latest edition to the ever-growing herds of dairy cattle in Tulare County.
NEWS
March 26, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Pete Wilson will visit an unemployed orange picker and a food bank in Visalia today to underline the plight of those left destitute by the pre-Christmas freeze. Wilson is scheduled to visit the home of Concepcion Meza, who has been struggling to find enough food for his wife and 10 children. Meza, who has picked oranges since coming to the United States 18 years ago, has been out of work since December, when a bitter freeze wiped out this season's orange crop.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a slow warming trend took hold across California, agricultural inspectors spent Monday in citrus groves, vegetable fields and packing houses trying to define the dimensions of the devastation that struck the state's frost-bitten agricultural industry over the weekend. Most of what they discovered was not encouraging.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
Tulare County Agricultural Commissioner Clyde Churchill said he expects a good turnout Wednesday when local farmers are being asked to turn in outdated, banned and otherwise unusable chemicals for disposal at a landfill near Visalia. Last week, more than 4,600 gallons of liquid chemicals were brought in during a similar program in nearby Kings County.
NEWS
January 4, 1989
Tulare County supervisors voted to restrict all business travel by county employees to San Francisco in reaction to that city's support of the United Farm Workers table grape boycott. "Don't buy our grapes; we won't patronize your town," was the message contained in the supervisors' resolution, drafted by the Tulare County Farm Bureau. The resolution also urges the County Supervisors Assn. of California not to hold meetings in San Francisco.
BUSINESS
July 23, 1988 | CHARLES HILLINGER, Times Staff Writer
Bill VanderPoel aided the cow in delivery of her newborn calf by gently pulling and wiggling the baby by her front legs from her mother's body. It was a special moment for the 6-foot-8, 21-year-old farmer. Two weeks ago, he moved his 800 cows from Southern California to his new 160-acre farm. "It's a female. That's always a plus for a milking operation," said VanderPoel, his face stretched in a wide grin. The calf was the latest edition to the ever-growing herds of dairy cattle in Tulare County.
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