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Tulare Lake Basin

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NEWS
October 25, 1987
The California Department of Fish and Game plans to require private operators of selenium-poisoned farm waste water ponds in the southern San Joaquin Valley to institute programs to scare birds away. A bird-scaring program using noisemakers and ground patrols--known as "hazing"--has been under way since 1984 at the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge, where massive numbers of bird deformities and deaths have been attributed to toxic levels of the trace mineral selenium in farm drainage water.
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BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES
J.G. Boswell Co. has been the main force in farming within the Tulare Lake basin for more than 70 years. The company was founded by Col. James Griffin Boswell, one of 13 children from a patrician cotton-farming family that was chased out of Georgia by the boll weevil in the 1920s. Boswell migrated to Corcoran and began carving out a cotton-growing and -ginning empire. He and other farmers struggled to control the four rivers that emptied into the lake.
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NEWS
November 3, 1987 | United Press International
State Fish and Game officials said Monday they plan to begin restocking Lake Kaweah later this week with the first of 120,000 trout and other sports fish. Officials have determined that the lake is clear of the chemical rotenone and is safe for fish. The state Department of Fish and Game injected rotenone into the lake Oct. 9 to launch the largest fish kill in state history in an attempt to rid Tulare Lake Basin waterways of the predatory white bass.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Avian birth deformities similar to those that devastated bird populations at the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and forced its closure have been found in wildlife at another site 100 miles to the south, federal officials report. Preliminary results of a yearlong study by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that the rate of deformities among some birds at the second site is even higher than at Kesterson.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999 | MARTHA GROVES
J.G. Boswell Co. has been the main force in farming within the Tulare Lake basin for more than 70 years. The company was founded by Col. James Griffin Boswell, one of 13 children from a patrician cotton-farming family that was chased out of Georgia by the boll weevil in the 1920s. Boswell migrated to Corcoran and began carving out a cotton-growing and -ginning empire. He and other farmers struggled to control the four rivers that emptied into the lake.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | RONALD B. TAYLOR, Times Staff Writer
Avian birth deformities similar to those that devastated bird populations at the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and forced its closure have been found in wildlife at another site 100 miles to the south, federal officials report. Preliminary results of a yearlong study by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that the rate of deformities among some birds at the second site is even higher than at Kesterson.
NEWS
March 17, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eleven farms and districts that use irrigation drainage ponds in Tulare Lake Basin have been fined a total of $130,000 for failing to file adequate plans to eliminate toxic salts. The Regional Water Quality Control Board in Fresno has sent notices that operators of ponds located in Tulare, Kings and Kern counties will be fined for failing to file corrective plans on time or filing incomplete plans.
NEWS
May 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Birds in the Tulare Lake basin are being poisoned by nesting and feeding at farm water evaporation ponds containing dangerous levels of selenium, according to a new federal study released Tuesday. Numerous comparisons between Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and the 398-acre Westfarmers evaporation ponds near Lost Hills are contained in the Department of Interior report.
NEWS
October 20, 1987
Department of Fish and Game crews applied the chemical rotenone to lakes, ponds, canals and streams in Tulare and Kings counties below Lake Kaweah to continue their efforts to eradicate white bass in the Tulare Lake Basin. The chemical was injected into Lake Kaweah on Oct. 9 to begin the project to eliminate the predatory white bass from the basin so they would not escape into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where officials fear they would threaten commercial salmon and striped bass fisheries.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | Associated Press
State water officials said Friday they expect to cut by half the amount of water delivered this year to agricultural customers, citing low rainfall and dwindling storage as California faces a fourth year of drought. The Department of Water Resources said, however, that full water deliveries would continue to urban areas.
NEWS
November 3, 1987 | United Press International
State Fish and Game officials said Monday they plan to begin restocking Lake Kaweah later this week with the first of 120,000 trout and other sports fish. Officials have determined that the lake is clear of the chemical rotenone and is safe for fish. The state Department of Fish and Game injected rotenone into the lake Oct. 9 to launch the largest fish kill in state history in an attempt to rid Tulare Lake Basin waterways of the predatory white bass.
NEWS
October 25, 1987
The California Department of Fish and Game plans to require private operators of selenium-poisoned farm waste water ponds in the southern San Joaquin Valley to institute programs to scare birds away. A bird-scaring program using noisemakers and ground patrols--known as "hazing"--has been under way since 1984 at the Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge, where massive numbers of bird deformities and deaths have been attributed to toxic levels of the trace mineral selenium in farm drainage water.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2004
Your recent piece on the apparent prosperity in the Tulare Lake Basin brought on by improved conditions for (some) farmers ("A Golden Harvest for State's Farmers," Nov. 7) was a pretty piece of fiction -- unfortunately, the same kind of story we like to tell about ourselves here. Whether farmer prosperity contributes to real community development and well-being depends on the size and tenure of farms. Those growers benefiting from the "improved" markets are the larger growers who survived the recent shakedown in almost every commodity grown in the valley; these better prices came at great expense to smaller growers, whose losses are still being felt in our towns.
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