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BUSINESS
November 22, 1992
The article "Mexico Backs Away From Pact on Tuna," by Michael Parrish and Juanita Darling (Nov. 4), contains several inaccuracies which I think should be corrected so that your readers are not given a misleading impression regarding Mexico's unwavering commitment to environmental protection and the sustainability of all living resources under its jurisdiction. Contrary to what the article asserts, there was never any "agreement reached with the U.S. government that would have banned tuna fishing in a part of the Pacific Ocean where thousands of dolphins are killed each year."
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WORLD
November 26, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Nations whose fleets fish for bluefin tuna and sharks ended a meeting in South Africa without reaching agreement on action to protect critically endangered species, environmentalist groups said. A proposal to ban fishing of the critically endangered porbeagle shark was blocked at the eight-day meeting in Cape Town of the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT), a body consisting of major Atlantic tuna and shark fishing nations, as well as other Atlantic coast nations, according to environmentalists who observed the meeting.
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SPORTS
December 20, 1995 | Pete Thomas
It was an impressive sight: monstrous tuna standing on their heads, lined up along the stern rail of the Excel in a display intended to show all comers what a long-range fishing trip is all about. And come they did, not only dozens of fishermen but passersby, friends and peddlers. It's a spectacle that occurs every time a boat returns from the Revillagigedo Islands, a remote, four-island chain beginning about 240 miles south of Cabo San Lucas and stretching to the southwest 260 miles farther.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Illegal fishing off Africa -- often by ships from wealthy nations like South Korea -- costs the continent millions of dollars a year, with poor West African nations among the hardest hit. Activists and environmental organizations are calling for new measures to prevent illegal fishing, including steps to make vessels -- and tuna fish -- more traceable, at a week-long meeting of the International Commission for the...
NEWS
June 17, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unlikely alliance--including the Bush Administration, Congress, environmentalists and the governments of Mexico and Venezuela--has forged a tentative agreement to stop the killing of thousands of dolphins caught annually in tuna-fishing nets. The pact, the result of months of negotiations, is included in legislation to be introduced in Congress today. The bill has bipartisan congressional support, and Mexico and Venezuela have already agreed to abide by such a pact.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1989 | ANTHONY MILLICAN, Times Staff Writer
Even while the U. S. tuna industry has changed drastically over the years, for Eddie Diehl and a small group of San Diego fishermen, the method of tuna fishing has remained the same. Diehl, 66, and about nine other San Diego bait boat owners still use poles to catch tuna, much like fishermen did at the turn of the century. "We fish the way it was always done," Diehl said recently as he readied his boat for a 30- to 40-day trip to the North Pacific. "We always will."
BUSINESS
July 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Japanese fishermen have sued the U.S. government, seeking to lift regulations that they say prohibit night tuna fishing in American coastal waters. The Tokyo-based Federation of Japan Tuna Fisheries Co-Operative Assns. claimed that the United States enacted regulations last month under the guise of protecting swordfish, but actually meant to ban the Japanese from taking tuna in U.S. coastal waters. In 1982, the suit says, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, a branch of the U.S.
SPORTS
May 15, 1991 | PETE THOMAS
Fishermen and their love of tuna. . . . They travel miles to battle the powerful fish. They spend huge amounts on tackle and boat tickets. The last few seasons have been extremely productive for the San Diego fleet, and experts say the tuna will cooperate again this summer. Enter the Mexican government and its announcement last month that five tuna a day are too many for the recreational fisherman. Two are plenty, it says.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
Responding to public outrage over the killing of sea mammals, including dolphins drowned in tuna nets, Congress passed the Marine Mammal Protection Act in 1972. The law proclaimed an "immediate goal" of reducing dolphin deaths and injuries "to insignificant levels approaching . . . zero." But, 17 years later, dolphins continue to perish by the tens of thousands. And that situation is not likely to change any time soon, tuna industry and government officials acknowledge.
WORLD
November 18, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Illegal fishing off Africa -- often by ships from wealthy nations like South Korea -- costs the continent millions of dollars a year, with poor West African nations among the hardest hit. Activists and environmental organizations are calling for new measures to prevent illegal fishing, including steps to make vessels -- and tuna fish -- more traceable, at a week-long meeting of the International Commission for the...
SPORTS
November 11, 2005 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Legendary bass fishing pro Roland Martin announced his retirement last week, prompting a Times assistant editor to wonder: "Guy retires from fishing ... how do you do that?" Although Martin has hung up his rod and reel when it comes to work, that's not the case when it comes to fun. As Martin explained in the Inside BASS newsletter: "I had a glorious fall season without worrying about tournaments. I killed a couple of moose in Alaska and a big elk in Utah. And I did all kinds of neat fishing.
OPINION
January 5, 2003 | JOHN BALZAR
And now, even dolphins.... Yielding to international pressure, the U.S. government has watered down the popular grocery labeling program that gave consumers a choice to buy "dolphin-safe" tuna fish. Nobody and nothing, it seems, is safe anymore. Critics have been warning that globalized free trade will mean the incremental demise of U.S. conservation standards -- and this is proof. That small but celebrated dolphin-safe logo on cans and packages of tuna in the supermarket?
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | CARA MIA DIMASSA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will begin any day now, along Sicily's western coast. The elaborate nets woven in a sequence of chambers that feeds into the square Camera di Morte--Room of Death--have, likely, already been set. A large, intricate cross, adorned with colorful images of Catholic saints, is already aloft, guarding the submerged nets and ensuring their bounty.
NEWS
October 3, 1999 | LESLIE MILLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Big tuna are so plentiful off Cape Cod this year that inexperienced weekend fishermen are taking to the seas--and getting in over their heads. At least three vessels have capsized in the last week, two of them because the fish were too big for the boats. "So far, we've been very fortunate that we haven't lost anyone yet," said Coast Guard Lt. Craig Jaramillo. In the 47 years he has been fishing off Cape Cod, old salt Russ Chase said he has never seen tuna fever like this.
NEWS
July 26, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate reached a compromise Friday to allow food processors to sell tuna in the United States even if dolphins were killed when the tuna were caught. But the companies would not be allowed to label the cans "dolphin safe."
NEWS
July 24, 1997 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the emotion evoked by Flipper the friendly dolphin, a complicated dispute over just when a can of tuna can be deemed "dolphin safe" has riven the environmental community and now has landed in the Senate. The controversy stretches from Capitol Hill to the depths of the eastern tropical Pacific and the rough-and-tumble world of deep-sea fishing.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1991 | From Reuters
A GATT disputes panel has ruled that a U.S. ban on tuna imports from Mexico violates international rules of commerce, a spokesman for the world trade body said Thursday. The United States imposed the ban in October, 1990, under environmental legislation, saying Mexican tuna-fishing methods killed dolphins that were caught in tuna nets. Mexico argued that the ban broke several General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade provisions, favoring U.S.
FOOD
July 25, 1996 | ANGELA PETTERA, Pettera is an intern at The Times
If you're watching your weight and eating canned tuna, you might be interested in this fact: All tuna is not created equal. Some varieties are fattier than others. In other words, you could buy a can of "premium albacore" solid white tuna packed in spring water one week with a label that describes the fat content as 1 gram per 2-ounce serving, only to find the same tuna the next week with a slightly different nutritional label, this one with 4 grams of fat per 2-ounce serving. What's going on?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1996 | DEBORAH BELGUM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not exactly Cannery Row reborn, but tuna canning, a once-thriving industry that faded from the Los Angeles waterfront in the 1980s, has regained a slender hold in San Pedro. Once again, boats are docking at Terminal Island to unload yellowfin and skipjack, and cans of tuna are rolling off the assembly lines at a cannery that reopened last month. The same cannery closed under different ownership a year ago, no longer able to compete with overseas operations.
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