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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Marc Evans caught this shot of lights reflecting off the Second Street tunnel Tuesday evening. He used a Canon EOS 5D Mark III. Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers. Share your photos on our  Flickr page  or  reader submission gallery .  Follow us on Twitter  or visit  latimes.com/socalmoments  for more on this photo series.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Joseph Serna
The two new tunnels discovered this week along the San Diego-Mexico border mark the sixth and seventh cross-border passages that authorities have located in the last four years. Officials have found more than 80 tunnels from California to Arizona since 2006. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents in San Diego announced the discovery of the two new drug-smuggling tunnels Friday, calling them sophisticated and elaborate. On Wednesday, ICE officials arrested a 73-year-old Chula Vista woman on suspicion of overseeing the operation of an underground tunnel leading under the border to an Otay Mesa industrial park in San Diego.
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WORLD
December 3, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Aging bolts could be to blame for the deadly collapse of a tunnel west of Tokyo, a highway maintenance executive told reporters Monday after nine people lost their lives to the weekend disaster. Tons of concrete panels tumbled onto cars in the Sasago tunnel on Sunday morning, crushing and trapping vehicles underneath. The disaster stunned a nation that relies heavily on tunnels to navigate its steep terrain and has been credited as a leader in tunnel safety. When it comes to tunnel sprinklers to stop fires, for instance, “they've been ahead of the game compared to Europe, the U.S. and a lot of North America,” said Fathi Tarada, managing director of Mosen Limited, a British consulting company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
A man described as being about 60 years old was struck and killed by an Amtrak train Friday in Chatsworth, fire officials said. The man was struck around 8:45 a.m. near the 10800 block of North Santa Susana Pass Road, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokeswoman Katherine Main. No other injuries were reported. She said the tracks were initially shut down as four fire companies and an ambulance were deployed to the scene. Amtrak spokeswoman Vernae Graham said the Pacific Surfliner train with about 250 passengers aboard was northbound with a maximum expected speed of about 60 mph in the area when it stuck what she called an "individual trespasser.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2013 | By Daniel Siegal
The city of Alhambra last week reaffirmed its support for a controversial tunnel that would connect the 710 and 210 freeways, proclaiming July 10 as “710 Day” in the city. “We as a city want to raise awareness that now is the time [the 710 freeway] can be completed,” Alhambra Mayor Steve Placido said at a news conference at City Hall Tuesday. Extending the 710 Freeway from its terminus in Alhambra via a tunnel to the 210 Freeway in Pasadena has for years faced strong opposition from politically powerful neighborhoods and elected officials.
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Armand Emamdjomeh
The 2nd Street tunnel is the latest flash point between drivers and bicyclists in downtown L.A. Both sides claim it as a key route into and out of downtown. With the addition of buffered bike lanes, drivers bemoan the loss of a driving lane and increased backups through the tunnel. You wouldn't know any of that, though, from this photo by Lizette Carrasco of a deserted tunnel on Friday night. Follow Armand Emamdjomeh on Twitter or Google + . Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
MAGAZINE
December 17, 2006
Anthony Hernandez's photograph of an L.A. River drainage tunnel was simply beautiful ("Everything #2," Photo Synthesis, by Colin Westerbeck, Nov. 19). I know very little of the homeless who sometimes inhabit these tunnels, but I do know about the people who build them. Beauty, of course, is in the eye of the beholder, and this is the beauty that I see in Hernandez's photo: I see that the storm drain was beautifully designed and constructed by an experienced contractor. The uniform flow of water in the pipe indicates that the pipe was laid out beautifully to the designed alignment and grade.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Nicholas Goldberg
It's been three months now since the city of Los Angeles, in its wisdom, slapped down the new, controversial bicycle lanes in the 2nd Street tunnel. Where there used to be four lanes of car traffic moving smoothly in both directions, there are now only two, plus a bike lane on either side. This is part of the city's ongoing efforts to make Los Angeles more bike-friendly. At the moment, there are about 350 miles of bike lanes in the city, among some 6,500 miles of streets. So how's it working out?
WORLD
February 12, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
NEW DELHI -- Jail officials in India's western Gujarat state were conducting an investigation Tuesday after a 42-foot tunnel was discovered by chance under a high-security prison. It was reportedly excavated by convicted bombers with engineering degrees and found by a guard looking for unauthorized carrier pigeons. Authorities found the tunnel on the northern side of a high-security chhota chakkar section of the Sabarmati Central Jail late Sunday. It had reportedly been excavated over several weeks by inmates using dishes, steel utensils, buckets, ropes and iron bars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2014 | By Matt Stevens
A man described as being about 60 years old was struck and killed by an Amtrak train Friday in Chatsworth, fire officials said. The man was struck around 8:45 a.m. near the 10800 block of North Santa Susana Pass Road, said Los Angeles Fire Department spokeswoman Katherine Main. No other injuries were reported. She said the tracks were initially shut down as four fire companies and an ambulance were deployed to the scene. Amtrak spokeswoman Vernae Graham said the Pacific Surfliner train with about 250 passengers aboard was northbound with a maximum expected speed of about 60 mph in the area when it stuck what she called an "individual trespasser.
NEWS
April 1, 2014 | By Kerry Cavanaugh
Having experienced the misery of commuting from the San Fernando Valley to Santa Monica, my ears always perk up when someone mentions building some kind of rapid transit through the Sepulveda Pass. There have been ideas floated, but the magnitude of the project, the technical challenges and the expense have always made an alternative to the 405 Freeway sound like a distant dream. It's true that Measure R, the half-cent sales tax increase passed in 2008, included about a billion dollars to begin developing a transit line along the 405. But transportation planners estimate that it will cost anywhere from $6 billion to $20 billion to build a rail connection from the Valley to the Westside.
SCIENCE
March 14, 2014 | By Bettina Boxall
A California appeals court has sided with landowners fighting the state over test drilling for a proposed water tunnel system in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. In a 2-1 decision, an appeals panel ruled Thursday that the state needed to go through the eminent domain process to gain access to private property on which it wanted to take soil samples and conduct environmental surveys. The testing is necessary for the design and construction of two 30-mile tunnels that the state proposes to build as part of a delta replumbing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Martha Groves
Seventy feet below Wilshire Boulevard, cater-corner from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's street-lamp installation, fresh air roaring from giant ventilation pipes dulled the sickly sweet smell of petroleum. Amid the clatter of jackhammers and the whine of a mini-excavator, paleontologist Kim Scott scouted the tarry muck for relics from a long-buried beach. She had plenty of choices. Major construction on the highly anticipated Westside subway extension won't begin until next year, but an exploratory shaft dug at the corner of Ogden Drive to assess soil conditions for future stations and tunnels has burped up a bonanza of prehistoric swag.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Nicholas Goldberg
It's been three months now since the city of Los Angeles, in its wisdom, slapped down the new, controversial bicycle lanes in the 2nd Street tunnel. Where there used to be four lanes of car traffic moving smoothly in both directions, there are now only two, plus a bike lane on either side. This is part of the city's ongoing efforts to make Los Angeles more bike-friendly. At the moment, there are about 350 miles of bike lanes in the city, among some 6,500 miles of streets. So how's it working out?
NEWS
February 12, 2014 | By Armand Emamdjomeh
The 2nd Street tunnel is the latest flash point between drivers and bicyclists in downtown L.A. Both sides claim it as a key route into and out of downtown. With the addition of buffered bike lanes, drivers bemoan the loss of a driving lane and increased backups through the tunnel. You wouldn't know any of that, though, from this photo by Lizette Carrasco of a deserted tunnel on Friday night. Follow Armand Emamdjomeh on Twitter or Google + . Each week, we're featuring photos of Southern California submitted by readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 2014 | By Laura J. Nelson
A decades-long effort to bring rail service directly to Los Angeles International Airport suffered a blow Thursday when transportation officials placed on the back burner a proposal for a light-rail tunnel under the terminal area, citing high costs and other risks. Metro will now primarily focus on routes that would leave the north-south Crenshaw/LAX Line as much as 1.5 miles east of the airport and rely on a circulator train to take passengers to their terminals. Barring a significant change, L.A. would soon have two light-rail routes that come near LAX but do not deliver passengers to their terminals, a problem that has puzzled and frustrated many civic leaders and transit users.
NATIONAL
July 12, 2012 | By William C. Rempel
SAN LUIS, Ariz. - The powerful Sinaloa drug cartel is believed to be behind one of the most sophisticated and well-engineered smuggling tunnels ever found along the U.S.-Mexico border, according to U.S. drug enforcement officials who announced the discovery Thursday in Yuma. The “fully operational” tunnel is a 755-foot passageway, tall enough for a 6-foot person to walk through, that burrows under the border fence, a park and a water canal. It connects a small, nondescript warehouse on the U.S. side to an inoperative ice manufacturing plant behind a strip club in Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2012 | By Ari Bloomekatz, Los Angeles Times
It was an unlikely setting for a bike race. But as night fell Saturday, more than 2,000 spectators filed into the 2nd Street tunnel in downtown Los Angeles to cheer on riders. With their heads down and legs pumping as fast as they would go, the cyclists blazed through the tunnel in pairs at a pace that reached well over 30 miles per hour. The best of the riders didn't even have brakes - slowing down was not their concern. "You just give it all you can, just pedal as fast as you can," said 29-year-old Mike "The Cheetah" Chitjian of Monterey Park, who was one of about 200 participants.
NATIONAL
January 12, 2014 | By Matt Pearce
West Virginians saw signs of hope Sunday even as 300,000 people spent a fourth day under orders not to use their tap water after a chemical spill. "I believe we're at a point where we see light at the end of the tunnel," Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin said. Water samples had shown positive signs that traces of a coal-cleaning chemical were slowly fading from the supply for nine counties, he said. There was still no timeline on when residents could use their water again, however, forcing residents and businesses to get creative on how they could safely cook, wash their hands and wash their clothes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Thomas Curwen
Tony Brake had seen tunnel fires before, and given the tower of black smoke and what he could see of the flames, he feared this one was going to be bad. On a Saturday morning in July, a tanker truck carrying 8,700 gallons of gasoline flipped over, and the two-lane underpass connecting the northbound Glendale Freeway with the northbound 5 Freeway turned into a blast furnace. If the tunnel - which supports the 5 Freeway - were to fail, the freeway would collapse. Traffic would be snarled for months, and for a region just emerging from a recession, the economic impact could be severe.
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